Anyone caught the new BBC Dracula?

Jun 4, 2013
5,958
2,800
Pretty darn good tbh! One or two cheesy lines from Dracula that aren't fitting for the time and so far they've only managed to squeeze one minority in, but in a way where I could say to myself yeah, that might have happened.

Part 2 is tonight and 3 tomorrow. Well worth a watch, I wholly recommend it.
 

Deebo

"Messkin" Deebo
Jun 5, 2013
15,866
11,599
Show dem balls bro
Pretty darn good tbh! One or two cheesy lines from Dracula that aren't fitting for the time and so far they've only managed to squeeze one minority in, but in a way where I could say to myself yeah, that might have happened.

Part 2 is tonight and 3 tomorrow. Well worth a watch, I wholly recommend it.
Thank you. I didn't even know this was showing. Something for me and the missus to watch together.
 
Reactions: Someguy101
Jun 14, 2012
13,745
6,345
I watched the first episode there. Its good but that first episode was longer than I expected to be honest.
 
Jun 4, 2013
5,958
2,800
For fucks sake! They had to do it didn't they, they just couldn't help themselves.

Threw in a bunch of victimised minorities and mixed it with some LGBT bullshit. Fuck me..... They can't even keep politics out of a horror show useless mother fuckers!

Aside from that the 2nd episode was good and the ending...wow did not forsee that coming.
 

BigBone

Sugalowda!
Jun 13, 2012
11,397
2,037
Tycho Station
For fucks sake! They had to do it didn't they, they just couldn't help themselves.

Threw in a bunch of victimised minorities and mixed it with some LGBT bullshit. Fuck me..... They can't even keep politics out of a horror show useless mother fuckers!

Aside from that the 2nd episode was good and the ending...wow did not forsee that coming.
Someone's clearly didn't read their Gothic horror / fantasy literature, it's full of LGBT characters (Lizards, Goblins, Babadooks and Trolls).

Is this from the same team that brought the great Penny Dreadful? Same Drac'?
 
Jun 4, 2012
28,383
18,976
Someone's clearly didn't read their Gothic horror / fantasy literature
Someone doesn't really need to does he? It's Bram Stoker's Dracula, not some other Gothic fantasy literature. That said, I will watch this, as it has good reviews and I don't object to interpretations being a little different to the source material, but overall the story should be followed or you may as well just make up a new show.
 
Reactions: Aussie_Al
Jun 14, 2012
13,745
6,345
Fuck me are all the episodes 90 minutes long. I know there's only 3 of them but still.

I really enjoyed the scenes in his castle in the first episode. I don't know it just reminded of those old horror films from the 30's or something. Great set design.
 
Jun 14, 2012
13,745
6,345
Someone doesn't really need to does he? It's Bram Stoker's Dracula, not some other Gothic fantasy literature. That said, I will watch this, as it has good reviews and I don't object to interpretations being a little different to the source material, but overall the story should be followed or you may as well just make up a new show.
Has the book ever been faithfully adapted. I've never read it myself and all I know is that Dracula is a vampire who lives in a castle in Transylvania.

Think I read before that Dracula and Tarzan are by far the most adapted literary characters.
 
Jun 4, 2013
5,958
2,800
Someone's clearly didn't read their Gothic horror / fantasy literature, it's full of LGBT characters (Lizards, Goblins, Babadooks and Trolls).

Is this from the same team that brought the great Penny Dreadful? Same Drac'?
I knew someone would say this but I was half expecting it to be haggis or PCF and say something long the lines of "dracula is fiction, it isn't set in reality"

Have you watched the 2nd episode? It's very 'modern' in it's PC agenda and it's a shame because it's a very good and unique take on the mythology and channels alot of Coppola's Dracula & improves the formula. The story is really good, fascinating even!

I'm not saying it's bad because of it's PC elements I'm saying there should be no need for them. Do we really need a black guy getting racial innuendo's thrown at him? Do we really need to be told about the injustices of LGBT issues in a gothic horror? Do we need the stereotypical 'noble' minority in a tudor / elizabethan (or whatever) setting just because it makes it 'modern'?

Frankly I find this bullshit insulting. Can we not focus on the source material and build a world around that rather than injecting modern politics into the mix? Is that too much to ask for?
 

BigBone

Sugalowda!
Jun 13, 2012
11,397
2,037
Tycho Station
I knew someone would say this but I was half expecting it to be haggis or PCF and say something long the lines of "dracula is fiction, it isn't set in reality"

Have you watched the 2nd episode? It's very 'modern' in it's PC agenda and it's a shame because it's a very good and unique take on the mythology and channels alot of Coppola's Dracula & improves the formula. The story is really good, fascinating even!

I'm not saying it's bad because of it's PC elements I'm saying there should be no need for them. Do we really need a black guy getting racial innuendo's thrown at him? Do we really need to be told about the injustices of LGBT issues in a gothic horror? Do we need the stereotypical 'noble' minority in a tudor / elizabethan (or whatever) setting just because it makes it 'modern'?

Frankly I find this bullshit insulting. Can we not focus on the source material and build a world around that rather than injecting modern politics into the mix? Is that too much to ask for?
I remember the days when a giant fuck yer mums used the be an insult, now it's TV characters.
 
Jun 4, 2012
28,383
18,976
Has the book ever been faithfully adapted. I've never read it myself and all I know is that Dracula is a vampire who lives in a castle in Transylvania.

Think I read before that Dracula and Tarzan are by far the most adapted literary characters.
Not sure to be honest.
 

NSFW

Freedom Fighter
May 14, 2013
22,969
11,643
Castle Duckula.
Turned it off. Thought the Borat character was too silly. May try watching again, but the PC stuff was a bit naff.
 

BigBone

Sugalowda!
Jun 13, 2012
11,397
2,037
Tycho Station
Do we really need to be told about the injustices of LGBT issues in a gothic horror?
Well, considering one of key Gothic novels is by most interpretations about a homosexual man named Victor Frankenstein, who unable to find love in society created a man for himself to be with (symbolic ejaculation scene upon creation in the famous movie adaptation a century ago directed by a gay person), and even though the creation was kind and caring, society found the 'monster' in him and killed him (many homosexual's fate), yeah - Gothic horror is in many cases about what at the time was considered sexual deviancy, and injustice inflicted. Some say rather than a teenage Mary Shelley, the novel was written by husband Percy Bysshe Shelley projecting own suppressed feelings.

Oscar Wilde wrote a Gothic novel about a career hedonist Dorian Grey with a large sexual appetite who was accused of 'ruining' young men's life. Well actually Wilde was later tried for being a homosexual and accused of 'ruining' young men's life, and Bram Stoker, a regular at Wilde for years actually wrote Dracula during the trial. Count Dracula, practically a sexual predator spreading vampire disease (= tuberculosis transmitted sexually), charms and forces the main character Jonathan Harker to live with him and his women in his castle, at one time claiming Harker belongs to him – the count's appetite doesn't entirely seem straight.

There's loads of homosexual subtext Gothic novels, and horror and fantasy are excellent forms or expressing such themes indirectly and symbolically.
 
Reactions: Aussie_Al and Broxi
Jun 4, 2012
28,383
18,976
Well, considering one of key Gothic novels is by most interpretations about a homosexual man named Victor Frankenstein, who unable to find love in society created a man for himself to be with (symbolic ejaculation scene upon creation in the famous movie adaptation a century ago directed by a gay person), and even though the creation was kind and caring, society found the 'monster' in him and killed him (many homosexual's fate), yeah - Gothic horror is in many cases about what at the time was considered sexual deviancy, and injustice inflicted. Some say rather than a teenage Mary Shelley, the novel was written by husband Percy Bysshe Shelley projecting own suppressed feelings.

Oscar Wilde wrote a Gothic novel about a career hedonist Dorian Grey with a large sexual appetite who was accused of 'ruining' young men's life. Well actually Wilde was later tried for being a homosexual and accused of 'ruining' young men's life, and Bram Stoker, a regular at Wilde for years actually wrote Dracula during the trial. Count Dracula, practically a sexual predator spreading vampire disease (= tuberculosis transmitted sexually), charms and forces the main character Jonathan Harker to live with him and his women in his castle, at one time claiming Harker belongs to him – the count's appetite doesn't entirely seem straight.

There's loads of homosexual subtext Gothic novels, and horror and fantasy are excellent forms or expressing such themes indirectly and symbolically.
This is classic academic musing...read more into a story than is there or intended by the author but mask it all in "some say" or "may well be" caveats. Just because Oscar Wilde was gay, does not mean he had a homosexual subtext to everything he wrote. Dorian Gray seduces women, it's a story about narcissism, the hypocrisy of Victorian society...you could read some homo-eroticism into the Lord Wotton character, but it's a minor, at best insinuated tone.

So if someone made a film of the book, and had Dorian Gray as gay, it wouldn't matter, as his sexuality is not really that important, but it sure as fuck would be a complete move away from what is in the text. You'd have to change all the key women he gets involved with to men...that wouldn't alter the moral of the story, but it wouldn't be true to the story either.

I haven't read Frankenstein, so can't comment strongly on your take, but it's completely pointless to just imply that Mary Shelley didn't write it and it might have been a suppressed Percy Shelley...what evidence is there that he was suppressed? Absolutely nothing about the way he lived his life suggests he was gay. He lived in Italian cities where it was not even illegal, so had ample opportunity to express himself if he wanted.

I can understand why some gay people focus on sexuality because so many gay people will have hidden it in the past, but it is such simplistic, pointless musings to simply start making up possible motivations for books based off absolutely no evidence.

There's homo-eroticism in some Gothic literature. Cool. Stoker might have been a suppressed gay man, and maybe Dracula was a metaphor in some ways, but fundamentally it was a horror story, if it was inspired by TB and suppressed homosexuality...again that's interesting, but it's not in the actual story is it? TB is not a sexually transmitted disease by the way.
 
May 19, 2013
17,561
7,063
Has the book ever been faithfully adapted. I've never read it myself and all I know is that Dracula is a vampire who lives in a castle in Transylvania.

Think I read before that Dracula and Tarzan are by far the most adapted literary characters.
The book is fantastic.
 
Reactions: jonnytightlips
May 19, 2013
17,561
7,063
Bram Stoker looks like my dad. Both are linked by the same geographical area of North Dublin. I'm convinced I am somehow related. The resemblance is uncanny.
 
Reactions: Aussie_Al

BigBone

Sugalowda!
Jun 13, 2012
11,397
2,037
Tycho Station
This is classic academic musing...read more into a story than is there or intended by the author but mask it all in "some say" or "may well be" caveats. Just because Oscar Wilde was gay, does not mean he had a homosexual subtext to everything he wrote. Dorian Gray seduces women, it's a story about narcissism, the hypocrisy of Victorian society...you could read some homo-eroticism into the Lord Wotton character, but it's a minor, at best insinuated tone.

So if someone made a film of the book, and had Dorian Gray as gay, it wouldn't matter, as his sexuality is not really that important, but it sure as fuck would be a complete move away from what is in the text. You'd have to change all the key women he gets involved with to men...that wouldn't alter the moral of the story, but it wouldn't be true to the story either.

I haven't read Frankenstein, so can't comment strongly on your take, but it's completely pointless to just imply that Mary Shelley didn't write it and it might have been a suppressed Percy Shelley...what evidence is there that he was suppressed? Absolutely nothing about the way he lived his life suggests he was gay. He lived in Italian cities where it was not even illegal, so had ample opportunity to express himself if he wanted.

I can understand why some gay people focus on sexuality because so many gay people will have hidden it in the past, but it is such simplistic, pointless musings to simply start making up possible motivations for books based off absolutely no evidence.

There's homo-eroticism in some Gothic literature. Cool. Stoker might have been a suppressed gay man, and maybe Dracula was a metaphor in some ways, but fundamentally it was a horror story, if it was inspired by TB and suppressed homosexuality...again that's interesting, but it's not in the actual story is it? TB is not a sexually transmitted disease by the way.
Sure, The Picture of Dorian Gray is not a gay novel by any means though character sex interchangeability works quite easy, and I don't think we're far off regarding Stoker/Dracula... but suggesting ppl. are smuggling stuff outside of straight Bible sexuality into moral Gothic novels is preposterous, in modern literature, they helped widening ppl's sexual horizon quite a bit, and were controversial in their time for doing so, including Dorian Gray. I guess in many ways TV series have the same effect, see trends of trans ppl. appearing on screen for example, and ppl. having problems with it.

Now to continue the conversation on BBC's Dracula vs. the novel and Gothic horror subtext, I'll have to actually watch the damn show, I'll put it on my list.
 
Reactions: Strike

BigBone

Sugalowda!
Jun 13, 2012
11,397
2,037
Tycho Station
BTW I do hope this Dracula builds on the legacy of the phenomenal and prematurely cancelled Penny Dreadful. If I had to pick a single TV episode as the past decade's best, it would be the one where Ms. Ives (Evan Green) confronts... well, no spoilers here, let's just say characters played by Rory Kinnear. That's one hour of absolutely pure acting and Gothic horror masterclass. Damn, I might have to rewatch the whole thing just by remembering it. So hell yeah, let's hope Dracula does well.

P.S. Fuck just realized where Tarantino stole the funniest / more gruesome scene in ... Hollywood from. :lol: Obvious spoilers

 
Last edited:
Jun 4, 2012
28,383
18,976
Sure, The Picture of Dorian Gray is not a gay novel by any means though character sex interchangeability works quite easy, and I don't think we're far off regarding Stoker/Dracula... but suggesting ppl. are smuggling stuff outside of straight Bible sexuality into moral Gothic novels is preposterous, in modern literature, they helped widening ppl's sexual horizon quite a bit, and were controversial in their time for doing so, including Dorian Gray. I guess in many ways TV series have the same effect, see trends of trans ppl. appearing on screen for example, and ppl. having problems with it.

Now to continue the conversation on BBC's Dracula vs. the novel and Gothic horror subtext, I'll have to actually watch the damn show, I'll put it on my list.
That's fair enough and likewise I need to watch it myself before commenting on the show directly.