Career change

Dazl1212

100% British Gammon.
May 16, 2013
18,249
4,834
UK
#1
Has anyone completely changed careers here before? How did you find it.

A bit of background;

I currently work in IT and telecoms and have for the past 15 years but I just dont enjoy it anymore, I dont hate it but its not something I'm passionate about, I literally go to work do what I have to leave and then do the same thing and spend all week looking forward to the weekend..

I started doing a degree in IT and Psychology and to be honest I havent really enjoyed the IT part, I thought I'd enjoy programming but the amount of maths involved and its turned out all ive been doing in python is sorting lists and things like that and I've found it really dull..

Im not an amazing money but I'd love to do a job where I actually look forward to going to work and where I feel like ive made a difference or helped someone.
 
Jul 29, 2014
1,752
1,135
UK
#2
I was a traffic operator for about 4/5 years and then moved into IT. Being a traffic operator was a horrible job. It was long stressful days, calls at 4 AM because someone had missed there booking to get on the dock. Constant communication with lorry drivers who treat you like shit. hundreds of phone calls a day chasing the same pieces of information. It was fucking horrible. I decided to move into IT, at the time I was in the fortunate position of living with my parents so I was able to take a junior position, I've still only been in IT for about 3 and a half years but I've worked hard and managed to get out of the help desk and into network engineering and systems administrations and have very little contact with the end user which is great!

I think I'll change careers again at some point. I've often thought of becoming an electrician but it seems like it would cost a fortune and literally take years followed by then starting on a very low wage for a few more years before getting to the stage where you can earn reasonable money.

Have you got a new career in mind?
 
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Dazl1212

100% British Gammon.
May 16, 2013
18,249
4,834
UK
#3
I was a traffic operator for about 4/5 years and then moved into IT. Being a traffic operator was a horrible job. It was long stressful days, calls at 4 AM because someone had missed there booking to get on the dock. Constant communication with lorry drivers who treat you like shit. hundreds of phone calls a day chasing the same pieces of information. It was fucking horrible. I decided to move into IT, at the time I was in the fortunate position of living with my parents so I was able to take a junior position, I've still only been in IT for about 3 and a half years but I've worked hard and managed to get out of the help desk and into network engineering and systems administrations and have very little contact with the end user which is great!

I think I'll change careers again at some point. I've often thought of becoming an electrician but it seems like it would cost a fortune and literally take years followed by then starting on a very low wage for a few more years before getting to the stage where you can earn reasonable money.

Have you got a new career in mind?
I couldnt be arsed with something like that. That sounds awful.

Good work on that mate, its a hard field to get into but once you've got your foot in the door progression is whatever you make it and if you're driven, as you are, you can earn some daft money. I got to low level network admin and just got fed up.

I do find psychology really interesting and feel it would be rewarding field and I feel i've helped a few people here in the mental health thread at least a little, but I've got my own mental health issues so I think that's a none starter really.

Teaching is another but I dont think I could cope with high school kids and again my mental health stuff would probably put a stop to that as well.
 
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rjjfan

The Greatest
May 17, 2013
10,407
3,381
#4
I was considering physical therapy, any physical therapist here to dissuade me? There's a 2 year masters program but it cost an arm and a leg and unless I'm getting a decent salary, fuck it.
 
May 16, 2013
19,873
8,251
Scotland
#5
Has anyone completely changed careers here before? How did you find it.

A bit of background;

I currently work in IT and telecoms and have for the past 15 years but I just dont enjoy it anymore, I dont hate it but its not something I'm passionate about, I literally go to work do what I have to leave and then do the same thing and spend all week looking forward to the weekend..

I started doing a degree in IT and Psychology and to be honest I havent really enjoyed the IT part, I thought I'd enjoy programming but the amount of maths involved and its turned out all ive been doing in python is sorting lists and things like that and I've found it really dull..

Im not an amazing money but I'd love to do a job where I actually look forward to going to work and where I feel like ive made a difference or helped someone.
Mate, the reality is that 90% of jobs are crap. Not fuckin' despising your job is about as good as it gets for most people.
 
Jun 7, 2013
3,129
2,124
#6
I’m in the same boat mate, physical manual labourer seems to be braking my body down and all I can think of is being an old fucking cripple who can barely tie his shoe laces, I’ve been looking more and more at getting gas registered, working indoors in people’s houses is appealing to me as I’m sick of working outside now aswell, money seems decent aswell
 

Dazl1212

100% British Gammon.
May 16, 2013
18,249
4,834
UK
#8
I’m in the same boat mate, physical manual labourer seems to be braking my body down and all I can think of is being an old fucking cripple who can barely tie his shoe laces, I’ve been looking more and more at getting gas registered, working indoors in people’s houses is appealing to me as I’m sick of working outside now aswell, money seems decent aswell
I imagine my bro will be in the same boat in the next ten years as a plasterer, its good money but brutal on your body.

Gas installation and repair is damn good money and if you think you'd enjoy it I'd definitely say go for it if you can afford it :thumbsup
 
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Apr 7, 2014
3,741
1,193
#9
I was considering physical therapy, any physical therapist here to dissuade me? There's a 2 year masters program but it cost an arm and a leg and unless I'm getting a decent salary, fuck it.
You're in the US? Most recent physical therapists get a doctorate which I believe is three years. The debt to income ratio is pretty terrible and nobody gets rich as a physical therapist. Dentists, optometrists, and podiatrists can make big money without going to med school. Pharmacists make quite a bit more than physical therapists but are generally capped due to corporate take over. There are some other good ones like PA's and radiology techs.
 
Likes: rjjfan
May 17, 2013
8,752
6,292
Louisiana
#10
I was considering physical therapy, any physical therapist here to dissuade me? There's a 2 year masters program but it cost an arm and a leg and unless I'm getting a decent salary, fuck it.
Because of some injuries requiring surgical repair on my knee, elbow and finally, rotator cuff, I found myself needing physical therapy after surgery to fully recuperate. I was very impressed with all the PT's that worked with me during these times and they all seemed to love their jobs.

In talking with them, they pretty much all said the same thing about their most negative aspect and it involved working with elderly people who just didn't want to do what was asked/required for them to make progress. In my times at PT I could clearly see what they were talking about when they'd tell some older person to do 20 repetitive movements to warm up their repaired joint while they attended to another patient-------and the person would do 10 or less and quit but claimed to have done them all. In reality, all these lazy bastards are doing is impeding their recovery and opening themselves up to further injury.

Every PT site I've been to has been a very clean environment, staffed with people who are there to help get things sorted and back on track for the patient. If I were a young man looking for a career or career change, that would be a very viable option to pursue.
 
Apr 7, 2014
3,741
1,193
#11
Because of some injuries requiring surgical repair on my knee, elbow and finally, rotator cuff, I found myself needing physical therapy after surgery to fully recuperate. I was very impressed with all the PT's that worked with me during these times and they all seemed to love their jobs.

In talking with them, they pretty much all said the same thing about their most negative aspect and it involved working with elderly people who just didn't want to do what was asked/required for them to make progress. In my times at PT I could clearly see what they were talking about when they'd tell some older person to do 20 repetitive movements to warm up their repaired joint while they attended to another patient-------and the person would do 10 or less and quit but claimed to have done them all. In reality, all these lazy bastards are doing is impeding their recovery and opening themselves up to further injury.

Every PT site I've been to has been a very clean environment, staffed with people who are there to help get things sorted and back on track for the patient. If I were a young man looking for a career or career change, that would be a very viable option to pursue.
Would you recommend it at a cost of 150k@6.5% interest for a salary of 75k?
 
May 17, 2013
8,752
6,292
Louisiana
#12
Would you recommend it at a cost of 150k@6.5% interest for a salary of 75k?
I'm not familiar with Student Loan interest rates, so are you saying that is the going rate for student loans in the States????

If so, that's a tough call and would take quite a while to pay back since those rates are higher than what you can get to buy a new house right now.
 
Apr 7, 2014
3,741
1,193
#13
I'm not familiar with Student Loan interest rates, so are you saying that is the going rate for student loans in the States????

If so, that's a tough call and would take quite a while to pay back since those rates are higher than what you can get to buy a new house right now.
That’s what the rate was when I last checked.
 
May 19, 2013
15,502
5,452
#14
Mate, the reality is that 90% of jobs are crap. Not fuckin' despising your job is about as good as it gets for most people.
Agreed.

I'd love a career change. Not sure what I'd do, but just not what I'm doing now.

But then I snap out of it and realise my job is very much bearable and has fleeting moments of enjoyment.

If I had the skill, talent and financial security, id love to just restore classic cars or make shit, with my hands. But, I have zero talent or experience in doing that and it probably doesn't pay the fucking bills.
 
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Likes: Dazl1212
May 16, 2013
5,125
1,498
Las Vegas, NV
www.facebook.com
#15
I languished as a school secretary for almost 10 years before going to school for a 2 year programming degree and jumping to my current job in software support. Thankfully the entry level helpdesk spot I took (just to get my foot in the door at a software company) was actually a financial improvement over what I was making as a secretary. I've now been promoted to a salaried support position and am making about 40% of what I was making before and honestly, I really like it. Don't get me wrong, it's work. I still look forward to the weekend all week, but at least I'm not some High School Assistant Principal's bitch anymore.
 

Dazl1212

100% British Gammon.
May 16, 2013
18,249
4,834
UK
#16
Agreed.

I'd love a career change. Not sure what I'd do, but just not what I'm doing now.

But then I snap out of it and realise my job is very much bearable and has fleeting moments of enjoyment.

If I had the skill, talent and financial security, id love to just restore classic cars or make shit, with my hands. But, I have zero talent or experience in doing that and it probably doesn't pay the fucking bills.
Maybe it's just a bit of frustration as things haven't been as fun as I thought a the my degree and I'm still reasonably early in the module.

The think is I could take the network aspect of the degree and I'd walk that fairly comfortably and then at least I'd have a degree.
 

Dazl1212

100% British Gammon.
May 16, 2013
18,249
4,834
UK
#17
I languished as a school secretary for almost 10 years before going to school for a 2 year programming degree and jumping to my current job in software support. Thankfully the entry level helpdesk spot I took (just to get my foot in the door at a software company) was actually a financial improvement over what I was making as a secretary. I've now been promoted to a salaried support position and am making about 40% of what I was making before and honestly, I really like it. Don't get me wrong, it's work. I still look forward to the weekend all week, but at least I'm not some High School Assistant Principal's bitch anymore.
I haven't enjoyed the coding stuff so far but it's early days. Maybe it'll get more interesting as I progress, so I may need to be patient.
 
Jan 26, 2014
5,390
1,709
#19
Done it a few times, never got stuck on one “career path” (leave that to the mugs)

Took a year off a couple years back came back in new sector, now “earning” 50% more than when I quit three years ago.

Follow your own path my friend
 
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Jan 22, 2015
434
227
#20
In the same boat. Currently doing supply chain but it bores me shitless and the pay is shit. Considering going into Data Analysis. Data jobs are one the biggest growth areas for 2019 and one of the most in demand careers by employers for 2019. Doing more reporting at work so increasing my excel ability and going to learn how to use Tableau in my current role. Going to study SQL In my spare time as well. Sure it will be boring as fuck tbh but need a better paying job that's future proof.

Any one who does data anaylst's / data scientists here?
 
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