Career change

Ryu

Jan 22, 2015
448
230
Done it a few times, never got stuck on one “career path” (leave that to the mugs)

Took a year off a couple years back came back in new sector, now “earning” 50% more than when I quit three years ago.

Follow your own path my friend
50% more! Fucking hell that's amazing. What did you do before and after?
 

Wig

Jan 26, 2014
5,406
1,711
50% more! Fucking hell that's amazing. What did you do before and after?
Business development type roles. But the content is irrelevant, my point being that following the prescribed path has a predictable outcome, stepping outside the box (and the comfort zone) has unlimited upside. The max downside is always zero remember either way. For me it was a complete mindset shift when I discovered the art of allowing, can recommend Abraham hicks to anyone with an open mind. Peace
 
Reactions: Dazl1212

Dazl1212

Ripley, strong independent woman who don't no man
May 16, 2013
18,686
5,177
UK
In the same boat. Currently doing supply chain but it bores me shitless and the pay is shit. Considering going into Data Analysis. Data jobs are one the biggest growth areas for 2019 and one of the most in demand careers by employers for 2019. Doing more reporting at work so increasing my excel ability and going to learn how to use Tableau in my current role. Going to study SQL In my spare time as well. Sure it will be boring as fuck tbh but need a better paying job that's future proof.

Any one who does data anaylst's / data scientists here?
Good luck in the it endevours im it'll sure pay off. I've done a bit of data analysis in my degree stuff. It's not for me. SQL engineers are very well paid and it's going to be sticking around for a long time.

I think I could deal with boring if it meant not being in an office every day. I've worked from home in my current job and I loved it. Not having people looking over your shoulder all day.
 

Dazl1212

Ripley, strong independent woman who don't no man
May 16, 2013
18,686
5,177
UK
Done it a few times, never got stuck on one “career path” (leave that to the mugs)

Took a year off a couple years back came back in new sector, now “earning” 50% more than when I quit three years ago.

Follow your own path my friend
Thanks for the advice man.

I'm really looking forward to the psychology part of my studies. If I can make a career out of it even better.
 

Joe E

Proud Shitholer
Jul 29, 2012
15,936
3,972
Has anyone completely changed careers here before? How did you find it.

A bit of background;

I currently work in IT and telecoms and have for the past 15 years but I just dont enjoy it anymore, I dont hate it but its not something I'm passionate about, I literally go to work do what I have to leave and then do the same thing and spend all week looking forward to the weekend..

I started doing a degree in IT and Psychology and to be honest I havent really enjoyed the IT part, I thought I'd enjoy programming but the amount of maths involved and its turned out all ive been doing in python is sorting lists and things like that and I've found it really dull..

Im not an amazing money but I'd love to do a job where I actually look forward to going to work and where I feel like ive made a difference or helped someone.
Work is work, D. It's not called fun. It's all drudgery. Go for the money. Make yourself as comfortable as possible. It's really all any of us have. Rightly or wrongly.
 

Ryu

Jan 22, 2015
448
230
Good luck in the it endevours im it'll sure pay off. I've done a bit of data analysis in my degree stuff. It's not for me. SQL engineers are very well paid and it's going to be sticking around for a long time.

I think I could deal with boring if it meant not being in an office every day. I've worked from home in my current job and I loved it. Not having people looking over your shoulder all day.
Cheers man. Out of interest what is an SQL engineer?? Is that the same as Data Analyst??

What do you actually want to do then? Psychologist jobs are tough to get in to so I've heard. Any other ideas you have?? A friend of mine was a probation officer for a while and found that quite rewarding and money is decent. Working one on one with offenders relates to your degree in psychology a little bit as your trying to change someone's mindset. Other then that maybe Sales or some kind of IT job where you are out and about.
 

Dazl1212

Ripley, strong independent woman who don't no man
May 16, 2013
18,686
5,177
UK
Cheers man. Out of interest what is an SQL engineer?? Is that the same as Data Analyst??

What do you actually want to do then? Psychologist jobs are tough to get in to so I've heard. Any other ideas you have?? A friend of mine was a probation officer for a while and found that quite rewarding and money is decent. Working one on one with offenders relates to your degree in psychology a little bit as your trying to change someone's mindset. Other then that maybe Sales or some kind of IT job where you are out and about.
SQL can be used for data analysis and all kinds really. You said you were going to study that so I figured that was the route you were going down. There was a lad at one of my old places who was being paid £250 a day.

I don't know, I wanted to go into cyber forensics or security.l, which is why I took psychology as a second subject. But I've really struggled with the maths side of things. Its not because i don't get it, it just bores me so I don't put thought into it.

I'd be happy to do something that enables me to work my own schedule, I did enjoy some of the web development stuff as you can see results instantly.

I'm good with people and have been asked to work on sales with the job I'm in at the moment. I've been in IT and telecoms 15 years and the only reason I've stayed where I am is because the place I'm at is pretty laid back. But that's changing now.
 

thegee

Highly Respected Gent
Feb 10, 2017
2,856
5,212
paignton
Since I was 20 I changed Jobs Completely, I was made redundant in Wales in the the Steel industry, I was married with a 0ne year old daughter. The Steelworks at one time employed aboutTen thousand people, and the Coal mines in the area probably about Five thousand. Within Ten years all those jobs disappeared and nothing replaced them. I joined the Metropolitan Police in London. . In all the years that I worked in the "Met" i never got bored. I worked really nice areas like Hampstead and really rough areas like Kilburn, Camden Town, and Kings Cross. No Two days were the same.. When . Iretired I was very lucky to get a number of jobs which paid well and also had pensions. I worked at the Cumberland Hotel ,a 1000 bedroom hotel at Marble As security . . . . . manager. . I then obtained employment at "Aquascutum" a very expensive clothing shop in Regent Street, as a manager
 
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thegee

Highly Respected Gent
Feb 10, 2017
2,856
5,212
paignton
@AndrewFFC, I am a Catholic , at the timein the early sixties , the Church discouraged membership of the Freemasons. Regards Mervyn the Gee
 

Wig

Jan 26, 2014
5,406
1,711
Thanks for the advice man.

I'm really looking forward to the psychology part of my studies. If I can make a career out of it even better.
Nice one pal, I've come to the conclusion we all have unlimited potential.

Our only limits are those we impose on ourselves. Simple as that, sounds like you're on the path, respect.
 
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Dazl1212

Ripley, strong independent woman who don't no man
May 16, 2013
18,686
5,177
UK
OK, so ive had a good think and Ive decided if I cant get a job that is rewarding IE
Some kind of job helping people like psychology or counselling.
I would like 1 of these two things to be a feature of my new job.

In order of preference
1,To work on my own schedule.
2, Work from home most of the time

My degree is open ended so if I stick with the IT side of it I can do


Computer Science

Communications and Networking

Software Development

Web Development

I would probably find Communications and networking as I have worked in the field before and its based on the CCNA which I have done most of anyway. I don't fancy doing a job where I'm on call etc.

I may struggle with Computer Science and Software development as I have no experience and i'm not great with maths.

Web Development again I have no experience other than basic HTML which I actually did enjoy earlier on in my degree.

Thoughts?
 

McGrain

Diamond Dog
Jul 6, 2012
6,621
3,042
I'm in compliance now and it's absolutely mental and loads of fun. I'm valued because I actually get shit down rather than just finding problems, which seems the easiest thing in the world to me, but apparently it's rare in my field. I think the reason for it is that I've had so many shit/weird jobs in my life I appreciate the one i've got because i'm wildly overpaid. It's fucking stupid how overpaid I am and I would literally do this job for half the money I'm on.

The way I found my way into this job was totally by accident. It was an accident, the job I had before that was an accident. They've all paid more than the one before though which I guess is progression. The thing is, planning a career, making a "big decision" it rarely works out the way you want it to. That's just fact. What I would say is use any enthusiasm to drive you, but don't expect it to be directly rewarded - being a psychologist sounds awesome but listening to cunts whine all day has the potential to get incredibly old incredibly quickly.

The only career advice I ever give anyone is in three parts:

1) Never talk yourself into a backwards step financially. "Rewarding" careers are for women IMHO.

2) Try hard

3) Never, ever be afraid to go and ask for more money. I know it's excruciating but it's astonishing how many times it pays off. Ten times in my life at least. It's agony for you and the person you're asking, maybe, but if you're sound and work hard the boss is going to prefer that one-off conversation with you to the terrifying career-climbing cunts (s)he normally has to deal with. Never underestimate how sound you are. The world is full of wrong cunts and they are all saying extremely wild things to all their bosses constantly. It's a trip.
 
Reactions: Trail and Dazl1212

Dazl1212

Ripley, strong independent woman who don't no man
May 16, 2013
18,686
5,177
UK
I'm in compliance now and it's absolutely mental and loads of fun. I'm valued because I actually get shit down rather than just finding problems, which seems the easiest thing in the world to me, but apparently it's rare in my field. I think the reason for it is that I've had so many shit/weird jobs in my life I appreciate the one i've got because i'm wildly overpaid. It's fucking stupid how overpaid I am and I would literally do this job for half the money I'm on.

The way I found my way into this job was totally by accident. It was an accident, the job I had before that was an accident. They've all paid more than the one before though which I guess is progression. The thing is, planning a career, making a "big decision" it rarely works out the way you want it to. That's just fact. What I would say is use any enthusiasm to drive you, but don't expect it to be directly rewarded - being a psychologist sounds awesome but listening to cunts whine all day has the potential to get incredibly old incredibly quickly.

The only career advice I ever give anyone is in three parts:

1) Never talk yourself into a backwards step financially. "Rewarding" careers are for women IMHO.

2) Try hard

3) Never, ever be afraid to go and ask for more money. I know it's excruciating but it's astonishing how many times it pays off. Ten times in my life at least. It's agony for you and the person you're asking, maybe, but if you're sound and work hard the boss is going to prefer that one-off conversation with you to the terrifying career-climbing cunts (s)he normally has to deal with. Never underestimate how sound you are. The world is full of wrong cunts and they are all saying extremely wild things to all their bosses constantly. It's a trip.
Good advice man. Thanks.

In regards to money I took a 25 % paycut between my old job and this job. Ok it was enforced as I lost my last job. But fuck me I am so much happier here than I was. If things stay as they have I'd be happy to carve out a decent career here. But unfortunately they've got new management in who seem to be trying to ruin it.
 
Apr 7, 2014
3,984
1,294
I'm in compliance now and it's absolutely mental and loads of fun. I'm valued because I actually get shit down rather than just finding problems, which seems the easiest thing in the world to me, but apparently it's rare in my field. I think the reason for it is that I've had so many shit/weird jobs in my life I appreciate the one i've got because i'm wildly overpaid. It's fucking stupid how overpaid I am and I would literally do this job for half the money I'm on.

The way I found my way into this job was totally by accident. It was an accident, the job I had before that was an accident. They've all paid more than the one before though which I guess is progression. The thing is, planning a career, making a "big decision" it rarely works out the way you want it to. That's just fact. What I would say is use any enthusiasm to drive you, but don't expect it to be directly rewarded - being a psychologist sounds awesome but listening to cunts whine all day has the potential to get incredibly old incredibly quickly.

The only career advice I ever give anyone is in three parts:

1) Never talk yourself into a backwards step financially. "Rewarding" careers are for women IMHO.

2) Try hard

3) Never, ever be afraid to go and ask for more money. I know it's excruciating but it's astonishing how many times it pays off. Ten times in my life at least. It's agony for you and the person you're asking, maybe, but if you're sound and work hard the boss is going to prefer that one-off conversation with you to the terrifying career-climbing cunts (s)he normally has to deal with. Never underestimate how sound you are. The world is full of wrong cunts and they are all saying extremely wild things to all their bosses constantly. It's a trip.
One funny thing about earning a lot is that people will more readily give you money for no reason.

I complained to someone who I have a contract with about my check being $20 short last week so he wrote me a $200 check.
 
Jun 4, 2013
5,086
1,905
Has anyone completely changed careers here before? How did you find it.

A bit of background;

I currently work in IT and telecoms and have for the past 15 years but I just dont enjoy it anymore, I dont hate it but its not something I'm passionate about, I literally go to work do what I have to leave and then do the same thing and spend all week looking forward to the weekend..

I started doing a degree in IT and Psychology and to be honest I havent really enjoyed the IT part, I thought I'd enjoy programming but the amount of maths involved and its turned out all ive been doing in python is sorting lists and things like that and I've found it really dull..

Im not an amazing money but I'd love to do a job where I actually look forward to going to work and where I feel like ive made a difference or helped someone.
Mate, the reality is that 90% of jobs are crap. Not fuckin' despising your job is about as good as it gets for most people.

It's weird isn't it?

As we get older we can relate to Lester Burnham from American Beauty more and more.....

I'm at that point in my life where I just want a job flipping burgers for the least amount of responsibility possible. Metaphorically.

Just give me a job where I don't have to deal with people face to face and I'm happy.

My mate linked me a job up in Scotland. It was basically some data gatherer/caretaker for some small island. Shit pay but all bills paid for. Walking around in nature all day going home to a log campfire. No commute. Nothing. Bliss.

If it wasn't for the family I'd have applied.
 
Reactions: Dazl1212
May 19, 2013
15,645
5,567
I'm in compliance now and it's absolutely mental and loads of fun. I'm valued because I actually get shit down rather than just finding problems, which seems the easiest thing in the world to me, but apparently it's rare in my field. I think the reason for it is that I've had so many shit/weird jobs in my life I appreciate the one i've got because i'm wildly overpaid. It's fucking stupid how overpaid I am and I would literally do this job for half the money I'm on.

The way I found my way into this job was totally by accident. It was an accident, the job I had before that was an accident. They've all paid more than the one before though which I guess is progression. The thing is, planning a career, making a "big decision" it rarely works out the way you want it to. That's just fact. What I would say is use any enthusiasm to drive you, but don't expect it to be directly rewarded - being a psychologist sounds awesome but listening to cunts whine all day has the potential to get incredibly old incredibly quickly.

The only career advice I ever give anyone is in three parts:

1) Never talk yourself into a backwards step financially. "Rewarding" careers are for women IMHO.

2) Try hard

3) Never, ever be afraid to go and ask for more money. I know it's excruciating but it's astonishing how many times it pays off. Ten times in my life at least. It's agony for you and the person you're asking, maybe, but if you're sound and work hard the boss is going to prefer that one-off conversation with you to the terrifying career-climbing cunts (s)he normally has to deal with. Never underestimate how sound you are. The world is full of wrong cunts and they are all saying extremely wild things to all their bosses constantly. It's a trip.
Yeah. The asking for more money is a big thing. Every review I bring up money. Why wouldn't you?
 
Reactions: McGrain
Jun 4, 2013
20,935
4,093
In the same boat. Currently doing supply chain but it bores me shitless and the pay is shit. Considering going into Data Analysis. Data jobs are one the biggest growth areas for 2019 and one of the most in demand careers by employers for 2019. Doing more reporting at work so increasing my excel ability and going to learn how to use Tableau in my current role. Going to study SQL In my spare time as well. Sure it will be boring as fuck tbh but need a better paying job that's future proof.

Any one who does data anaylst's / data scientists here?
I'm a data scientist, but the data I work with is genetic data. I don't have any experience or even know how commercial data is generated or utilized. I'd like to think it's the same, but I have huge doubts it is. I mean the data we generate is in the 100's of gbs range. At the top spectrum of the data we generate, you have to use a supercomputer or else you'll crash any pipeline you try to work on. I've worked on it a few times, and it's pretty difficult. It's hard to get used to working on a sole terminal with no GUI.

I will say it's a boring, solitary job. You will not meet any girls whatsoever. I came from a big lab group. There were 8 of us, 2 guys (me included) and the rest girls. I'm literally the only one that even wanted to do this type of work. When that guy from Google that got fired said that girls aren't attracted to tech jobs, it's 100% the truth.

It's like vagina-repellant when I'm discussing this stuff with the lab :lol:. We have these meetings every 2 weeks, and no one gives a shit other than my supervisor. Girls get wet when you talk about CRISPR, plasmid transformation, TEM, viruses, or some shit, but when it comes to scripting, they don't give a shit.

Excel is useful, but I wouldn't use it for anything other than housing your data. Typically, you will use other programs and algorithms to generate your data and analyze it. I'm good with Excel, but I don't use it for anything other than visualizing some of the matrices I create.

I'm someone with a biomedical degree, and I'm a data scientist. I had absolutely no idea about this field nor skills in this field before entering my graduate program. Science has become computerized. When they say it's a fast growing career, they're not lying. I'm in the middle of it, and every single interview I've had thus far has been impressed by it. It's like that high-skill, low-prestige job that no one wants to do.

I was actually wondering if my skills would translate to commercial/financial use, and I'm seeing the same requirements: R, SQL, Excel, and sometimes SPSS and Python. I've never worked with SQL, but it sounds like a very useful thing to get a grip on. I mean the skills I'm learning seem to be able to translate. I've used SPSS before, though. It's a janky, lesser statistical program. R is overall superior, but I guess some places haven't gotten with the times.