Career change

Jun 5, 2013
427
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#49
If wanting to get into IT without a degree or experience in the sector, what is the best way and which part of IT to get into by doing a short course or something??
 

Dazl1212

100% British Gammon.
May 16, 2013
18,216
4,810
UK
#50
If wanting to get into IT without a degree or experience in the sector, what is the best way and which part of IT to get into by doing a short course or something??
Get your Comptia A+ and N+ and try and get a job on a helpdesk if you want to do some kind of support.
 
Jul 29, 2012
16,703
2,370
#51
Been searching searching searching for what to do next. Successfully ran my own business, and don't want to sell car repair jobs for a living. I know what I want to do. I want to get into training and development for large corporations. I am about 10% hopeful for a job with Capital One doing exactly that at an associate level. I have, since my time as an infantryman, loved the training aspect of my jobs. I think that that is what I need to be doing if I am going to feel fulfilled. Figure out the best ways to teach tasks and skills to people and put those training prompts out into the field.

In other news, I got accepted to go to a forum held by Wells Fargo for a veterans internship program designed to establish career paths for military veterans. Part of their "we fucked up, look we aren't that bad anymore" schtick, I guess. I'll go to the forum and interview. If offered the internship, I'll take it, but I dunno if I want it. The only other highly likely option at this point is running a Gold's Gym, and I can't think of many things that would make me want to hang myself more than spending every day of my life stressing over selling gym memberships. I'm an excellent salesman, and I hate it. Anyway. That was a bit of a rant. Sorry.
 
Jun 6, 2013
667
46
#52
Good luck on your new endeavor and a career change is very doable. People do it with a plan. A little input here gives you X output.

I will say this.

You don't get paid (real money, if that is you are after) to do easy.

For your field, the architect level gives you more independence and will be paid for it.

Be realistic without giving hope. If there is something new you want to do, will it require a degree or new training? If so, do you have the time and financial means to take on new studies and/or the financial responsibility. Age should not really matter but it probably does.
 
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Jul 28, 2012
82
1
#53
I'm a data scientist, but the data I work with is genetic data. I don't have any experience or even know how commercial data is generated or utilized. I'd like to think it's the same, but I have huge doubts it is. I mean the data we generate is in the 100's of gbs range. At the top spectrum of the data we generate, you have to use a supercomputer or else you'll crash any pipeline you try to work on. I've worked on it a few times, and it's pretty difficult. It's hard to get used to working on a sole terminal with no GUI.

I will say it's a boring, solitary job. You will not meet any girls whatsoever. I came from a big lab group. There were 8 of us, 2 guys (me included) and the rest girls. I'm literally the only one that even wanted to do this type of work. When that guy from Google that got fired said that girls aren't attracted to tech jobs, it's 100% the truth.

It's like vagina-repellant when I'm discussing this stuff with the lab :lol:. We have these meetings every 2 weeks, and no one gives a shit other than my supervisor. Girls get wet when you talk about CRISPR, plasmid transformation, TEM, viruses, or some shit, but when it comes to scripting, they don't give a shit.

Excel is useful, but I wouldn't use it for anything other than housing your data. Typically, you will use other programs and algorithms to generate your data and analyze it. I'm good with Excel, but I don't use it for anything other than visualizing some of the matrices I create.

I'm someone with a biomedical degree, and I'm a data scientist. I had absolutely no idea about this field nor skills in this field before entering my graduate program. Science has become computerized. When they say it's a fast growing career, they're not lying. I'm in the middle of it, and every single interview I've had thus far has been impressed by it. It's like that high-skill, low-prestige job that no one wants to do.

I was actually wondering if my skills would translate to commercial/financial use, and I'm seeing the same requirements: R, SQL, Excel, and sometimes SPSS and Python. I've never worked with SQL, but it sounds like a very useful thing to get a grip on. I mean the skills I'm learning seem to be able to translate. I've used SPSS before, though. It's a janky, lesser statistical program. R is overall superior, but I guess some places haven't gotten with the times.

You should look into the AI side of it...where the money is.
 

Deebo

"Messkin" Deebo
Jun 5, 2013
12,685
8,036
Show dem balls bro
#54
Has anyone completely changed careers here before? How did you find it.

A bit of background;

I currently work in IT and telecoms and have for the past 15 years but I just dont enjoy it anymore, I dont hate it but its not something I'm passionate about, I literally go to work do what I have to leave and then do the same thing and spend all week looking forward to the weekend..

I started doing a degree in IT and Psychology and to be honest I havent really enjoyed the IT part, I thought I'd enjoy programming but the amount of maths involved and its turned out all ive been doing in python is sorting lists and things like that and I've found it really dull..

Im not an amazing money but I'd love to do a job where I actually look forward to going to work and where I feel like ive made a difference or helped someone.
If you have a degree in IT then go into the straight Systems Adminsitration jobs. Honestly programming sucks for most people who thought they would enjoy it after a few years of doing it. Network infrastructure, domain architecture, digital interfaces, etc., these are the things that renewed my joy of working in IT. I'm over 25 years in the field and if I stuck with plain programming/coding/software development I'd have quit the game years and years ago. Probably.
 
Jun 4, 2013
20,354
3,802
#55
You should look into the AI side of it...where the money is.
Not doing this for a long term job. The data process was part of my thesis research, and I just ended up getting hired for it. I'm hoping to get into a PhD program this year. That's where all the real money and prestige is.
 

Dazl1212

100% British Gammon.
May 16, 2013
18,216
4,810
UK
#57
If you have a degree in IT then go into the straight Systems Adminsitration jobs. Honestly programming sucks for most people who thought they would enjoy it after a few years of doing it. Network infrastructure, domain architecture, digital interfaces, etc., these are the things that renewed my joy of working in IT. I'm over 25 years in the field and if I stuck with plain programming/coding/software development I'd have quit the game years and years ago. Probably.
its definitely an option, maybe my priorities are all wrong?

I can do my degree in network architecture to be fair and its the area I have the most knowledge in.

Fact is once Ive finished my degree with it being in a sensible subject I am going to be better off regardless.
 

Dazl1212

100% British Gammon.
May 16, 2013
18,216
4,810
UK
#58
Ok, @Trail @Mexi-Box @Deebo and anyone else who's interested. Ive been doing my degree in IT but I have really not enjoyed it. Since its an open STEM degree I have decided (for now) to do it in subjects I enjoy and have an interest in such as Astronomy and the search for extra-terrestrial life. My thinking is that if I enjoy it, Im more likely to finish it and I have a degree which will open up other avenues for me.
 
Nov 4, 2015
2,655
858
#59
I'm a software developer. I started out in quality assurance many years ago and worked my way into development. There are good jobs in IT and bad jobs in IT. Software development is still one of the good jobs because not everyone can do it and no matter what kind of absurd restraints employers try to muscle into it they're still limited by people. Yes, even with H1Bs in play. Many of them can't code for shit.

I started with PHP and Javascript then moved into RDBMS like MySQL. Then over time I added Java and Oracle SQL. I also knew C from college but my degree is in fine arts. My feelings are that if you can understand one of the hard typed languages you can do any of them. You just have to be willing to learn perpetually into the future. It's not a job where a hammer is always a hammer if you get my drift.
 

Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
30,002
6,545
#60
Ok, @Trail @Mexi-Box @Deebo and anyone else who's interested. Ive been doing my degree in IT but I have really not enjoyed it. Since its an open STEM degree I have decided (for now) to do it in subjects I enjoy and have an interest in such as Astronomy and the search for extra-terrestrial life. My thinking is that if I enjoy it, Im more likely to finish it and I have a degree which will open up other avenues for me.
I'll stick education (for me) in its simplest terms, Daz. I never went to university to further my career chances, I went to find out about things and to meet people. I was charmed enough to be good enough at A-Level to get to two Russell Group Universities and do a BA and an MA

https://russellgroup.ac.uk/about/our-universities/

and study like a punk at something I was interested in - Philosophy - the abstract theory of knowledge.

The universities I went to (University of Sheffield and King's College, London) at the time I was there were top 5 in the country for my subject, so I was doing okay...but I never used that to further my career, I didn't care about that.

When I left KCL I was earning £8000 a year as an admin assistant for the Employment Tribunals Service, fat lot of good that £45000 worth of debt did me any good.

I returned to study in 2000 to train as a teacher. That was the only time I ever went to university to further my career. The rest was just sitting in libraries consuming knowledge and writing subversive literature (only joking), and writing essays to get the best marks I could possibly get. I was 2% off of a Class I degree in my first degree. One module let me down. Fuck.

My advice to you, enjoy your study, worry about the real life later.
 
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