CHB Baseball Thread - Cubs v Indians World Series

Jun 4, 2013
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I remember the Baltimore Bullets winning the 1978 NBA Championship (you don't live in Boston Celtics territory and not be acutely aware of who else gains that title if it's not your team). Articles were written about what a low key titleholder that team was where the revered NFL Colts were the premiere sports franchise. Portland's Trail Blazers got a lot more attention with Bill Walton in 1977, as the Seattle Supersonics would in 1979 with Dennis Johnson. The 1978 Bullets had arguably the lowest profile of any NBA Champion ever.
I love how both guys ended up on the greatest team ever to win a title (Walton and DJ) and I still think without injuries Walton is more than the best 6th man of all time.
But regarding the Bullets,it's no secret the game was on it's knees at that time.
But we all know now a saviour was en route to save the EC and the whole league....
Not that I like to talk about him much.:yep
 

Duo

Bosomus Maximus
Jun 14, 2012
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Cal's consecutive games record is one of the greatest in sports history. I honestly can't see it being broken, ever.
Agreed. For me, 2,130 games wasn't the critical benchmark for Cal to pass, it was 2,500. When that threshold was passed, I felt there was a very reasonable doubt that Gehrig would still retain that record if he'd retired in good health. As it was, Ripkin surpassed him by an incredible 602 games. Lou would have needed to play around four more years w/out missing a game to hold off Cal. Ripkin was 38 when he ended the streak, Gehrig was 37 when he died. Having passed 2,000 games (a very significant story itself at the time), Lou was possibly aiming for 2,500 himself when he got ill.

Everett Scott held the consecutive games record Gehrig broke at 1,307 games. Prior to that, it was held by George Pinkney at 507 games. That helps put in perspective what a distinguished sports record this is.

Remarkably, Cal would have only extended his record by around a dozen games before injury benched him in early 1999 if he hadn't voluntarily taken himself out of the lineup near the end of 1998 to halt the distractions of how long he could extend the record. While 2,500 was a concrete benchmark for him to me as a fan, 2,600 was the clincher he selected, and I'm happy with that punctuation mark he chose to settle at.

I still imagine he considers catching the final out of the 1983 WS to be his true career highlight, the play which gave him his championship ring.


On the NFL gridiron, I think Emmitt Smith's 4,409 rushing attempts is similarly unreachable. Crazy durability, and winning season three of DWTS showed the physical condition he maintained after all that hard play.
 
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May 18, 2013
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Wisco
Cal's consecutive games record is one of the greatest in sports history. I honestly can't see it being broken, ever.
No, it's crazy, especially for a middle infielder. How he never turned an ankle or anything to put him on the Pines for a day is crazy. Baseball isn't the most physical game but it's a grind unlike other sports.

The other is dimaggio's 56 game hitting streak, so hard to do with bullpen specialization of today's game.
 
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Duo

Bosomus Maximus
Jun 14, 2012
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I love how both guys ended up on the greatest team ever to win a title (Walton and DJ) and I still think without injuries Walton is more than the best 6th man of all time.
But regarding the Bullets, it's no secret the game was on it's knees at that time.
But we all know now a saviour was en route to save the EC and the whole league....
Not that I like to talk about him much.:yep
Bill scored over 20 points both times he started in place of Parish that year. I loved how he laughed about the challenges of learning to drive New England's roundabouts and rotaries when he came to Boston, and those current commercial endorsements for Good Feet which he's done with Mary Lou Retton is a major coup for that company. (36 orthopedic surgeries? I'm surprised he didn't choose to have his feet amputated!)

For me as a Celtics fan, Bird and Magic were a package deal for the NBA. Magic kept looking for instances where they could play on the same team, but even in the 1992 Olympics it seemed a little weird, as close as they were as friends. I was more comfortable with Larry playing alongside Eastern Conference rivals in the All-Star Games. I have to admit though that seeing guys like Shaq in Celtics green was also strange. (Nobody in the NBA could do a west coast/east coast transition quite like Walton.)
 
Jun 1, 2013
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Chicago
Yeah, fuck Sammy Sosa. The sad thing about it is that he was actually one of my favorite players in the late 90s. Not only was he cheating with the steroids, but with a corked fucking bat too.

Yeah, '94 was a sad year for my 12 year old self. I remember when they came back, there was a lot of hostility with the fans not wanting to go to some games, a lot of the fans were also on strike. I was living in New York, and I remember a lot of sad Yankee fans being upset because they were in first place and they didn't get to finish the season. Keep in mind though this was before the later 90s and early 00s success, and they had not won in a while, so the kids around my age or a little older weren't "spoiled" yet by vintage New York Yankee success. The fucking Expos though, lol, that was their only chance lol
Yup. The White Sox were in first place, too, and having made it to the ALCS and put up a decent fight against the champion Blue Jays the previous year, it felt like they had the experience and roster to finally get it done. We had the reigning Cy Young (Black Jack McDowell) and MVP (Big Hurt), too. I was 10 years old at the time, and firmly believed that the strike had ruined what would be their only real shot at the World Series in my lifetime. What happened later alleviated the pain of that, of course.

That fucking strike was the most garbage bullshit of my youth. Followed closely by the NHL lockout that came shortly after.
 
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May 18, 2013
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Yup. The White Sox were in first place, too, and having made it to the ALCS and put up a decent fight against the champion Blue Jays the previous year, it felt like they had the experience and roster to finally get it done. We had the reigning Cy Young (Black Jack McDowell) and MVP (Big Hurt), too. I was 10 years old at the time, and firmly believed that the strike had ruined what would be their only real shot at the World Series in my lifetime. What happened later alleviated the pain of that, of course.

That fucking strike was the most garbage bullshit of my youth. Followed closely by the NHL lockout that came shortly after.
You remember the nfl strike and replacement players? The packers where actually half decent with them. It happened when my first memories of sports begin which happens to be the darkest of days in green bay, like 4-12 type seasons.

So being 6-7-8 years old I was a Joe Montana fan. Still have a personalized autograph I got for Christmas from him
 

Duo

Bosomus Maximus
Jun 14, 2012
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Don't you think it's weird that Lou Gehrig died of Lou Gehrig's disease?
Would you believe that's been open to question?...

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2010/aug/17/lou-gehrig-disease-baseball-death

Beyond what this article says in passing, it should be specified that he played fullback on the gridiron, attending and playing for Columbia on a football scholarship at a time of leather helmets, when fullbacks usually handled the heavy ball carrying, and gridiron play was much closer to its rugby roots. At 6'1" and 212, he was a sizable athlete by early 1920's standards, in a position of targeted impact. Maybe he was too tough for his own survival.

Keep in mind also that batting helmets were not used until after his career. (The American League did not mandate batting helmets until 1958.) He seems to have gotten beaned by pitches with some frequency through remaining in the lineup. Does Ripken break Lou's record without a batting helmet to wear? That adds yet another level to Gehrig's record, that he did it without batting helmets AFTER the dead ball era had ended.
 
Jun 4, 2013
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11,691
Would you believe that's been open to question?...

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2010/aug/17/lou-gehrig-disease-baseball-death

Beyond what this article says in passing, it should be specified that he played fullback on the gridiron, attending and playing for Columbia on a football scholarship at a time of leather helmets, when fullbacks usually handled the heavy ball carrying, and gridiron play was much closer to its rugby roots. At 6'1" and 212, he was a sizable athlete by early 1920's standards, in a position of targeted impact. Maybe he was too tough for his own survival.

Keep in mind also that batting helmets were not used until after his career. (The American League did not mandate batting helmets until 1958.) He seems to have gotten beaned by pitches with some frequency through remaining in the lineup. Does Ripken break Lou's record without a batting helmet to wear? That adds yet another level to Gehrig's record, that he did it without batting helmets AFTER the dead ball era had ended.

You're a fucking goldmine for good info Duo.
I hope no one got offended my my post.Anyone who watched a much loved classic TV series (2nd best ever) knows where it came from.:good
 

steviebruno

CHB NYC Delegate
Jun 5, 2013
13,674
4,080
New York City
Yup. The White Sox were in first place, too, and having made it to the ALCS and put up a decent fight against the champion Blue Jays the previous year, it felt like they had the experience and roster to finally get it done. We had the reigning Cy Young (Black Jack McDowell) and MVP (Big Hurt), too. I was 10 years old at the time, and firmly believed that the strike had ruined what would be their only real shot at the World Series in my lifetime. What happened later alleviated the pain of that, of course.

That fucking strike was the most garbage bullshit of my youth. Followed closely by the NHL lockout that came shortly after.
Yankees would have won it
Would you believe that's been open to question?...

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2010/aug/17/lou-gehrig-disease-baseball-death

Beyond what this article says in passing, it should be specified that he played fullback on the gridiron, attending and playing for Columbia on a football scholarship at a time of leather helmets, when fullbacks usually handled the heavy ball carrying, and gridiron play was much closer to its rugby roots. At 6'1" and 212, he was a sizable athlete by early 1920's standards, in a position of targeted impact. Maybe he was too tough for his own survival.

Keep in mind also that batting helmets were not used until after his career. (The American League did not mandate batting helmets until 1958.) He seems to have gotten beaned by pitches with some frequency through remaining in the lineup. Does Ripken break Lou's record without a batting helmet to wear? That adds yet another level to Gehrig's record, that he did it without batting helmets AFTER the dead ball era had ended.
He also played through multiple concussions before they were diagnosed as such.
http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/08/17/als.lou.gehrigs.concussions/
 
Jun 1, 2013
1,343
80
Chicago
You remember the nfl strike and replacement players? The packers where actually half decent with them. It happened when my first memories of sports begin which happens to be the darkest of days in green bay, like 4-12 type seasons.

So being 6-7-8 years old I was a Joe Montana fan. Still have a personalized autograph I got for Christmas from him
That's a touch too early in my memory. My first real fandom was the Bulls, who I conveniently started watching religiously during the 90-91 season. I was 6-7 years old at the time.

Although I also had an appreciation for Joe Montana. In my second-grade classroom library there was a short paperback book called "NFL's Greatest Quartbacks" or something like that. It skewed a bit older with chapters on guys like Bart Starr and Roger Staubach, (and oddly, a chapter on Danny White, who didn't seem like he really belonged), but also had a chapter on Montana, and I remember reading that and kind of becoming a fan of him that way. We had a football game on the original Nintendo, pre-Madden days, and I always used the Niners so I could play as Montana. I feel like Montana and the Niners were a gateway drug to football for a lot of kids coming up in the late 80s/early 90s.
 
May 18, 2013
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977
Wisco
That's a touch too early in my memory. My first real fandom was the Bulls, who I conveniently started watching religiously during the 90-91 season. I was 6-7 years old at the time.

Although I also had an appreciation for Joe Montana. In my second-grade classroom library there was a short paperback book called "NFL's Greatest Quartbacks" or something like that. It skewed a bit older with chapters on guys like Bart Starr and Roger Staubach, (and oddly, a chapter on Danny White, who didn't seem like he really belonged), but also had a chapter on Montana, and I remember reading that and kind of becoming a fan of him that way. We had a football game on the original Nintendo, pre-Madden days, and I always used the Niners so I could play as Montana. I feel like Montana and the Niners were a gateway drug to football for a lot of kids coming up in the late 80s/early 90s.
Had to be tecmo bowl right? When I was in college we played tecmo super bowl as much as madden. We used to do seasons with 15 or so guys. Lots of fun
 

Duo

Bosomus Maximus
Jun 14, 2012
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So here's something of a follow-up to the magnitude of the Cubs win. When the Patriots won their first Super Bowl, Tom Brady reportedly quipped at the moment he put on his championship cap, "I wonder how big the victory parade for the Red Sox will be when they win?" (Boston's a baseball town first and foremost.)

An estimated one million fans turned out in Boston to celebrate that first New England title win in February 2002.

Sure enough, Brady's prescient speculation at his moment of triumph was validated in 2004, when an estimated three million celebrants turned out for the Red Sox first triumphal duck boat procession.

Last Friday, schools in Chicago were let out, and the day was otherwise treated as a holiday when FIVE MILLION attendees crowded the streets to cheer the Cubs.

When I visited NYC in early 1975 as part of a tour group, we kids were told they then had a population of eight million.

Chicago's not quite Boston over the last decade, but the sports angst they long suffered from in baseball and hockey should be long gone, while the Bears and Bulls have tradition to rebuild on. Five million party goers does show how much Cubs fans care though, and I can't abide an apathetic fan base.

Baltimore cared greatly about the Colts, as Cleveland did about the Browns. Neither city ever should have been without an NFL franchise. On the other hand, I've never really been sold on fan loyalty in Los Angeles, regardless of the money the Rams can make there. I'm glad the Rams got title wins for Cleveland in 1945 and St Louis in 1999, sorry those cities lost the Rams to LA, and not certain how much LA fans really care. (The transient Raiders did win a Super Bowl for LA in 1983, so that city's NFL drought does not extend back to the legendary 1951 Rams offensive juggernaut.)

Where's the next long sporting drought going to end?
 
May 19, 2013
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6,562
Where's the next long sporting drought going to end?
On Saturday, in rugby, Ireland beat the New Zealand all blacks in a test game for the first time ever and for the first time in 111 years.

The game was played in Chicago in soldier field.
 
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Duo

Bosomus Maximus
Jun 14, 2012
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On Saturday, in rugby, Ireland beat the New Zealand all blacks in a test game for the first time ever and for the first time in 111 years.

The game was played in Chicago in soldier field.
Epic. I miss Soldier Field w/out the Doric columns though. Used to be you could just tell in an instant what stadium it was on any broadcast by those neo-Classical colonnades in the picture background, but then idiot architects renovated that historic landmark with a colonnic.
 
May 18, 2013
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Wisco
Epic. I miss Soldier Field w/out the Doric columns though. Used to be you could just tell in an instant what stadium it was on any broadcast by those neo-Classical colonnades in the picture background, but then idiot architects renovated that historic landmark with a colonnic.
They did leave the columns but they are only visible from the outside. that new stadium is a bit of a mess all around. the playing surface is amongst the worst in the nfl and the Bears do not own it nor maintain it. the stadium is owned by the city and the field is maintained by the parks department. it is also too small and doesn't have enough boxes to maximize revenue for the team.

Looks like it has plenty of good seats though

Just looking quick Cincy currently has the longest championship drought followed by milwaukee. Milwaukee doesn't count imo, the packers still have a gold and green ticket package. the gold tickets are for the people that had seats in county stadium
 

Duo

Bosomus Maximus
Jun 14, 2012
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They did leave the columns but they are only visible from the outside. that new stadium is a bit of a mess all around. the playing surface is amongst the worst in the nfl and the Bears do not own it nor maintain it. the stadium is owned by the city and the field is maintained by the parks department. it is also too small and doesn't have enough boxes to maximize revenue for the team.

Looks like it has plenty of good seats though

Just looking quick Cincy currently has the longest championship drought followed by milwaukee. Milwaukee doesn't count imo, the packers still have a gold and green ticket package. the gold tickets are for the people that had seats in county stadium
Speaking of which, Lambeau Field had a completely awful playing surface for the Colts on Sunday. Back in 1967 a newfangled turf heating system malfunctioned, turning that surface into a block for the Ice Bowl. (Thank you, George Halas, Jr.) Legend has it that Lombardi actually had it turned off, and that Belichick, like Shula, are always asking themselves, "How would Vince cheat in this situation?" (As Joe Montana said about Deflate Gate, "If you ain't cheatin,' you ain't tryin'!") Green Bay MUST have a bad playing field. It's tradition!

Remember Veteran's Stadium in Philly? Players would walk and even run onto the surface, then exit in wheelchairs, on crutches, stretchers, in ambulances, and games would end with body parts littering the turf. (Lambeau may have been the "frozen tundra," but Veteran's was the "artificial turd." It was like a pasture where cows had eaten and shit out the Assholeficial Turf all over the field.)

I wish they could bring back Kansas City's Municipal Stadium. The Chiefs have sucked at Arrowhead since closing Municipal with that legendary double OT passing of the torch to the Dolphins on Christmas Day 1971, and only Montana has been able to bring KC close to a championship since. (For me, his post 49ers career with the Chiefs puts a fine capstone on his greatness, and his number 19 in KC is itself a throwback jersey just as Len Dawson's 16 has been.)

When I define championship droughts in my own mind, I consider the intervals between titles won for some reason. Hence, I didn't think of the Phillies as having ended a drought in 1980, or the Bengals as being in a drought with never having won it all yet. (That was also my mentality with the Patriots first Super Bowl win. A long time coming, but not a long time BETWEEN championships won. Cincy is long overdue for an NFL Title BTW, but Mike Brown's definitely not his father, and Marvin Lewis has had more than long enough to deliver. Sam Wyche did get them to the Super Bowl, and his teams could be a helluva lotta fun to watch even when they didn't win.)

Longest NFL drought belongs to the team of the 1950's, Detroit Lions. Indoor teams have a hard time winning Super Bowls. Lions seem to be attempting a move this year (like KC), but these are usually blips on the radar to an overall losing pattern. Matt Stafford is turning into a hellion on the field though. I like that arm! (At least Millen was man enough to finally apologize to Detroit fans for sucking so completely.)
 
May 18, 2013
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977
Wisco
Speaking of which, Lambeau Field had a completely awful playing surface for the Colts on Sunday. Back in 1967 a newfangled turf heating system malfunctioned, turning that surface into a block for the Ice Bowl. (Thank you, George Halas, Jr.) Legend has it that Lombardi actually had it turned off, and that Belichick, like Shula, are always asking themselves, "How would Vince cheat in this situation?" (As Joe Montana said about Deflate Gate, "If you ain't cheatin,' you ain't tryin'!") Green Bay MUST have a bad playing field. It's tradition!

Remember Veteran's Stadium in Philly? Players would walk and even run onto the surface, then exit in wheelchairs, on crutches, stretchers, in ambulances, and games would end with body parts littering the turf. (Lambeau may have been the "frozen tundra," but Veteran's was the "artificial turd." It was like a pasture where cows had eaten and shit out the Assholeficial Turf all over the field.)

I wish they could bring back Kansas City's Municipal Stadium. The Chiefs have sucked at Arrowhead since closing Municipal with that legendary double OT passing of the torch to the Dolphins on Christmas Day 1971, and only Montana has been able to bring KC close to a championship since. (For me, his post 49ers career with the Chiefs puts a fine capstone on his greatness, and his number 19 in KC is itself a throwback jersey just as Len Dawson's 16 has been.)

When I define championship droughts in my own mind, I consider the intervals between titles won for some reason. Hence, I didn't think of the Phillies as having ended a drought in 1980, or the Bengals as being in a drought with never having won it all yet. (That was also my mentality with the Patriots first Super Bowl win. A long time coming, but not a long time BETWEEN championships won. Cincy is long overdue for an NFL Title BTW, but Mike Brown's definitely not his father, and Marvin Lewis has had more than long enough to deliver. Sam Wyche did get them to the Super Bowl, and his teams could be a helluva lotta fun to watch even when they didn't win.)

Longest NFL drought belongs to the team of the 1950's, Detroit Lions. Indoor teams have a hard time winning Super Bowls. Lions seem to be attempting a move this year (like KC), but these are usually blips on the radar to an overall losing pattern. Matt Stafford is turning into a hellion on the field though. I like that arm! (At least Millen was man enough to finally apologize to Detroit fans for sucking so completely.)
The story on the ice bowl is that the heaters were on but as soon as they removed the tarp the condensation that had built up on the tarp froze instantly. I'm guessing heating coils of the 60's were never going to keep up with -11 below.

Apparently sunday they tried to treat the field to prevent dew and that backfired and made it slippery. it's been crazy warm around here and its staying warm over night because there is a ton of moisture in the air. it looks like it rained the night before there is so much dew on the ground.

I know a guy that played for the Eagles in the 80s. that field ended his career. it was a terrible surface, didn't nfl films even do a special on how bad it was. for some reason I remember a guy talking about all he seams and catching cleats, the old turmoil nubs in them. I played on game on astrology turf, it was a strange experience. it never felt right the entire game.

Matt stafford can flat out play. interesting to watch him have what may be his best year without Calvin Johnson. Looks like they are going to win the division unless the packers can ger their heads out of their ass's

strange that indoor teams struggle so much because everyone practices inside anyway which is dumb if you ask me. the packers other than game day spend about as much time in the cold as does the guy working in an office, which is from the car to work and back to the car. he'll those guys probably have remote start so they don't even have to get in a cold car.
 

Duo

Bosomus Maximus
Jun 14, 2012
6,812
3,582
The story on the ice bowl is that the heaters were on but as soon as they removed the tarp the condensation that had built up on the tarp froze instantly. I'm guessing heating coils of the 60's were never going to keep up with -11 below.

Apparently sunday they tried to treat the field to prevent dew and that backfired and made it slippery. it's been crazy warm around here and its staying warm over night because there is a ton of moisture in the air. it looks like it rained the night before there is so much dew on the ground.

I know a guy that played for the Eagles in the 80s. that field ended his career. it was a terrible surface, didn't nfl films even do a special on how bad it was. for some reason I remember a guy talking about all he seams and catching cleats, the old turmoil nubs in them. I played on game on astrology turf, it was a strange experience. it never felt right the entire game.

Matt stafford can flat out play. interesting to watch him have what may be his best year without Calvin Johnson. Looks like they are going to win the division unless the packers can ger their heads out of their ass's

strange that indoor teams struggle so much because everyone practices inside anyway which is dumb if you ask me. the packers other than game day spend about as much time in the cold as does the guy working in an office, which is from the car to work and back to the car. he'll those guys probably have remote start so they don't even have to get in a cold car.
:good Thanks for the precise clarification on those field issues. By one standard, I believe those Green Bay Cheerleaders to be the greatest cheer squad ever. Perhaps the only girls who could have staffed a Bering Sea crab boat with the guys. Snow on Lambeau Field ruined Jim Brown's bid to help Cleveland successfully defend their NFL Championship in 1965. I believe he was MVP in the following NFL All Star Game, then went into movies.

Yes, NFL Films did do a special about how bad the Veteran's surface was, completely notorious.