Do you prefer audio books to real books?

Nov 10, 2014
4,509
1,156
East London
I've downloaded some audiobooks recently and I'm not too fond of them. Usually the narrator tried to put on overly dramatic voices or uses stupid accents which he or she can't maintain throughout.
 
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Jun 4, 2013
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I don’t really consider an audiobook a ‘book’ per se. I view them more as a focused podcast. The narration is important, an audiobook can be made or ruined by that, regardless of content. Always sample first
 
Aug 28, 2014
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I don’t really consider an audiobook a ‘book’ per se. I view them more as a focused podcast. The narration is important, an audiobook can be made or ruined by that, regardless of content. Always sample first
Can you ever write a simple answer?
 
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mandela

CHB Führer
May 16, 2013
23,103
10,343
Scotland
I've downloaded some audiobooks recently and I'm not too fond of them. Usually the narrator tried to put on overly dramatic voices or uses stupid accents which he or she can't maintain throughout.
Prefer audiobooks nowadays.

Can lie in bed with no light and fall asleep. Can listen on my lunchtime walk, doing chores, driving, etc. Just offers more convenience.

The narration is crucial though. Always sample, if you can. There's been a few books I've really looked forward to but just couldn't listen to for similar reasons you mention.

Don't let those bad experiences ruin them for you though.
 
Jun 4, 2013
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775
The rest of the world disagree with you. For verification refer Google.
No they don’t, google it. The fact that you’re doing two different things when you’re listening and reading should be enough of a clue for you. That means you’re activating different parts of your brain, and it’s also likely that you’re doing two completely different things (I listen to audiobooks when driving/gym, books are done sitting down and focusing), which affects how you remember it.
So yeah, they really are two completely different things.
 
Mar 17, 2019
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No they don’t, google it. The fact that you’re doing two different things when you’re listening and reading should be enough of a clue for you. That means you’re activating different parts of your brain, and it’s also likely that you’re doing two completely different things (I listen to audiobooks when driving/gym, books are done sitting down and focusing), which affects how you remember it.
So yeah, they really are two completely different things.
Had already Googled it and you are wrong.

Making things up and pretending they are backed by research is obviously a habit of yours.
 
Jun 4, 2013
7,488
775
Beginning to wonder whether you can actually read.
I’m wondering if you can, because that says exactly what I said (they are different, depends on context, purpose etc.). It also has some links for the topic you couldn’t google last time as well.

How old are you? If you are a senior it’s a bit more understandable, that you don’t know how to use google or understand things.
 
Jul 24, 2012
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8,269
I prefer audiobooks, especially for non-fiction and long winded heavy novels... I can listen to them in the car or at the gym, so long as whatever I'm doing doesn't need any real concentration otherwise I find that 10 minutes has passed and I haven't taken a single thing in... I also like history podcasts for the same.
 
Nov 10, 2014
4,509
1,156
East London
I prefer audiobooks, especially for non-fiction and long winded heavy novels... I can listen to them in the car or at the gym, so long as whatever I'm doing doesn't need any real concentration otherwise I find that 10 minutes has passed and I haven't taken a single thing in... I also like history podcasts for the same.
I listened to one of the game of thrones books on audiobook. It wasn't bad but I could read faster than the narrator narrating.

The problem I have is actually reading is that I would read without digesting words after a while.
 

Duo

Bosomus Maximus
Jun 14, 2012
6,888
3,667
No, I do not like audio books. I want to read at my preferred pace, which is typically much faster than the human voice can speak. There's my short answer for TL;DRers.

One example of a great exception to that is something along the lines of Shakespeare, not really meant to be read or viewed, but listened to. Radio broadcasts and sound recordings are the perfect medium for Shakespeare. I've a brother who drove a four hour round trip job commute for years. He memorized Shakespeare's works by listening to them in his car. He didn't get Shakespeare as a college student, despite reading the literature, or seeing stage performances and movies, but hearing the dialogue while driving clicked perfectly.

Excellent story telling isn't the same thing. I don't want to read a narrative poem like The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes, or listen to it in the form of some fucking song, I want to hear it the way I grew up hearing it, with its vivid visual imagery only as spoken by Alexander Scourby and nobody else, ever. (No female voice should be applied to this classic. Noyes and Scourby owned it completely.)

When I read something like the legendary correspondence of @Groucho Marx, I definitely listen to his voice in my mind's ear at the pace he spoke. An extraordinary commercial opportunity exists for a mimic of his to dictate his literary output.

Here's a letter Groucho wrote to Woody Allen in 1967, the comedian Groucho considered the funniest above everybody else, respected and admired the most. (@RC, is there any way you could speed read this without slowing down enough to hear Groucho speak his words?):

http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/09/there-is-no-money-in-answering-letters.html
 
Jul 24, 2012
8,481
8,269
I listened to one of the game of thrones books on audiobook. It wasn't bad but I could read faster than the narrator narrating.

The problem I have is actually reading is that I would read without digesting words after a while.
I'm kinda the opposite, I read everything too carefully... I've been off and on reading Republic by Plato lately and it can be tedious, whereas if I listened on audiobook because it's a passive thing, I would listen more consistently and get through it within no time.

I listened to Moby Dick on audiobook and thank fuck, cos there's no way I was reading and finishing that shite. Entire chapters on the jawbone of a whale. I listened to the entire Qu'ran in no time, which was pretty easy going and then tried to do the same with the Bible, got to Book Of Numbers or Deuteronomy and thought "fuck this" and gave up. I use it for stuff like that, stuff I know I wouldn't stick out if I was reading a hard copy.
 
Nov 10, 2014
4,509
1,156
East London
I'm kinda the opposite, I read everything too carefully... I've been off and on reading Republic by Plato lately and it can be tedious, whereas if I listened on audiobook because it's a passive thing, I would listen more consistently and get through it within no time.

I listened to Moby Dick on audiobook and thank fuck, cos there's no way I was reading and finishing that shite. Entire chapters on the jawbone of a whale. I listened to the entire Qu'ran in no time, which was pretty easy going and then tried to do the same with the Bible, got to Book Of Numbers or Deuteronomy and thought "fuck this" and gave up. I use it for stuff like that, stuff I know I wouldn't stick out if I was reading a hard copy.
A bit off topic but why the hell would you listen to religious books? I think they're boring and repetitive and I can find so many better things to watch/listen to/read.

But each to their own I guess?