Eerie/creepy photos. **UPDATED** - A few historical photos.

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
31,672
Sites of WW1 battlefields, more than a century later:




This Abbey served as an observation post.


The Somme. Every year, farmers unearth several tonnes of old munitions and metal debris that bomb disposal experts have to remove.


A sculpture by German artist Kathe Kollwitz, titled "The Mourning Parents" at the World War I Vladslo German Cemetery in Vladslo, Belgium, on May 8, 2014. The cemetery contains the graves of over 25,000 German soldiers. The artists son, Peter Kollwitz, who was killed in the war when he was only 18 years old is buried in a grave in front of the statue.


HMS Caroline. Built in 1914, saw action at the Battle of Jutland in 1916, and was only decommissioned in 2011.


A dive holds an unexploded bomb recovered from a river downstream of a WW1 battlefield.


Maple leaf army jacket emblem found on the corpse of a Canadian soldier in northern France.


Trees stand where the village of Fleury once stood, near Verdun, on March 5, 2014. A hundred years after the guns fell silent in World War One, nine villages wiped out by fighting on France's bloodiest battleground continue to lead a ghostly existence. Their names still appear on maps and in government records. Mayors representing them are designated by local authorities. But most of the streets, shops, houses and people who once lived around the French army stronghold of Verdun are gone.


Watches found with the remains of French WW1 soldiers, on June 3, 2013 in Verdun, France. At least 26 bodies of French soldiers were found in the cellar of a farm in the totally destroyed village of Fleury-devant-Douaumont. Seven were identified by their military identification plate.


Archeological workers unearth a British WWI Mark IV tank in Flesquieres, near Cambrai in northern France, on November 19, 1998. British troops abandoned the tank on November 20, 1917, and German troops then buried it and used it as a bunker.


Unexploded shells are lined up along a wall awaiting removal by bomb-disposal experts after a French farmer found them while plowing his fields near the Courcelette British cemetery, the scene of a WWI battlefield in the Somme, on March 12, 2014.


:hat
 
May 16, 2013
7,033


Two of the Bali 9, a group of Australian total morons who accepted a free trip to Bali offered by a near stranger, and surprise surprise! They were turned into drug mules, to smuggle heroin into Australia. :lol:

Anyway, this is them in Bali's main airport, a few minutes after they were caught with heroin strapped to their bodies. This was in 2005. They're still in jail in Bali. They have no release date. They will probably die in jail there. In the photo above, you can see they're sick because they know they're fucked. But they can't yet properly comprehend that they're done - their lives are now over.

:hat
Their biggest mistake was not being female.

 

kf3

Jul 17, 2012
3,663
South London
there was once a man who ate butter in his hindustan
he also drank milk
he joined the british army and went to the european war

germany captured this man
he wishes for india, wants to go to hindustan
so he gets the food he had in former times

3 long years have passed
if this man stays 2 more
he will die.


ww1 poetry indian style.
 
Apr 7, 2014
3,858


Two of the Bali 9, a group of Australian total morons who accepted a free trip to Bali offered by a near stranger, and surprise surprise! They were turned into drug mules, to smuggle heroin into Australia. :lol:

Anyway, this is them in Bali's main airport, a few minutes after they were caught with heroin strapped to their bodies. This was in 2005. They're still in jail in Bali. They have no release date. They will probably die in jail there. In the photo above, you can see they're sick because they know they're fucked. But they can't yet properly comprehend that they're done - their lives are now over.

:hat
I thought the guy on the right was wearing party-gag plastic tits.
 
Reactions: Loco Roco and Meast
May 17, 2013
8,823
Louisiana
Sites of WW1 battlefields, more than a century later:




This Abbey served as an observation post.


The Somme. Every year, farmers unearth several tonnes of old munitions and metal debris that bomb disposal experts have to remove.


A sculpture by German artist Kathe Kollwitz, titled "The Mourning Parents" at the World War I Vladslo German Cemetery in Vladslo, Belgium, on May 8, 2014. The cemetery contains the graves of over 25,000 German soldiers. The artists son, Peter Kollwitz, who was killed in the war when he was only 18 years old is buried in a grave in front of the statue.


HMS Caroline. Built in 1914, saw action at the Battle of Jutland in 1916, and was only decommissioned in 2011.


A dive holds an unexploded bomb recovered from a river downstream of a WW1 battlefield.


Maple leaf army jacket emblem found on the corpse of a Canadian soldier in northern France.


Trees stand where the village of Fleury once stood, near Verdun, on March 5, 2014. A hundred years after the guns fell silent in World War One, nine villages wiped out by fighting on France's bloodiest battleground continue to lead a ghostly existence. Their names still appear on maps and in government records. Mayors representing them are designated by local authorities. But most of the streets, shops, houses and people who once lived around the French army stronghold of Verdun are gone.


Watches found with the remains of French WW1 soldiers, on June 3, 2013 in Verdun, France. At least 26 bodies of French soldiers were found in the cellar of a farm in the totally destroyed village of Fleury-devant-Douaumont. Seven were identified by their military identification plate.


Archeological workers unearth a British WWI Mark IV tank in Flesquieres, near Cambrai in northern France, on November 19, 1998. British troops abandoned the tank on November 20, 1917, and German troops then buried it and used it as a bunker.


Unexploded shells are lined up along a wall awaiting removal by bomb-disposal experts after a French farmer found them while plowing his fields near the Courcelette British cemetery, the scene of a WWI battlefield in the Somme, on March 12, 2014.


:hat
I hate to think of the number of soldiers that are buried in makeshift unmarked graves from WWI that will never be found.

I guess it must be normal for the farmers to occasionally plow up munitions from so long ago, and even though they are likely unable to explode, there's always that minute off chance one will detonate.
 
Reactions: Trail

Pedderrs

DKSAB
Jun 1, 2012
21,729
29
United Kingdom


Two of the Bali 9, a group of Australian total morons who accepted a free trip to Bali offered by a near stranger, and surprise surprise! They were turned into drug mules, to smuggle heroin into Australia. :lol:

Anyway, this is them in Bali's main airport, a few minutes after they were caught with heroin strapped to their bodies. This was in 2005. They're still in jail in Bali. They have no release date. They will probably die in jail there. In the photo above, you can see they're sick because they know they're fucked. But they can't yet properly comprehend that they're done - their lives are now over.

:hat
Wait, were these guys coerced and forced into doing this once they got into Bali, or are they really that stupid?
 
Last edited:
May 17, 2013
8,823
Louisiana
I read The Wikipedia entry yesterday. It looks like they knew what was going on according to it.
If they did know and did it of their own accord, then they're dumb as a box of rocks. Bet if you asked either of them now if it was worth the risk, you'd hear a resounding 'NO'. Looks like they were lucky they were not in a country that imposes the death penalty for drug smuggling.
 

Pedderrs

DKSAB
Jun 1, 2012
21,729
29
United Kingdom
If they did know and did it of their own accord, then they're dumb as a box of rocks. Bet if you asked either of them now if it was worth the risk, you'd hear a resounding 'NO'. Looks like they were lucky they were not in a country that imposes the death penalty for drug smuggling.
I think 3 of them are dead.

Fascinating but depressing. If they were forced into it, that’s a tragedy. But if they willing did this? I can’t comprehend such stupidity.
 
Apr 7, 2014
3,858
If they did know and did it of their own accord, then they're dumb as a box of rocks. Bet if you asked either of them now if it was worth the risk, you'd hear a resounding 'NO'. Looks like they were lucky they were not in a country that imposes the death penalty for drug smuggling.
Two of them (I think one is in the picture) had already pulled off a successful smuggling trip.

The ringleaders were executed.
 


Two of the Bali 9, a group of Australian total morons who accepted a free trip to Bali offered by a near stranger, and surprise surprise! They were turned into drug mules, to smuggle heroin into Australia. :lol:

Anyway, this is them in Bali's main airport, a few minutes after they were caught with heroin strapped to their bodies. This was in 2005. They're still in jail in Bali. They have no release date. They will probably die in jail there. In the photo above, you can see they're sick because they know they're fucked. But they can't yet properly comprehend that they're done - their lives are now over.

:hat
Apart from the 2 ringleaders who were killed by firing squad, one has already died of cancer and Renee Lawrence had her 20 year sentence reduced to 13 for good behaviour and presidential pardons. She gets out this month.
I’m not sure about the fate of the other 5.

At least two them accepted to do it in order to wipe drug debts.
 
Jun 3, 2013
477
If they did know and did it of their own accord, then they're dumb as a box of rocks. Bet if you asked either of them now if it was worth the risk, you'd hear a resounding 'NO'. Looks like they were lucky they were not in a country that imposes the death penalty for drug smuggling.
While the death penalty for drugs is fucking ridiculous on its own would smuggling drugs out of a country warrant it ? Smuggling drugs into a country I can understand but taking them out ? Seems extreme.
 
May 17, 2013
8,823
Louisiana
While the death penalty for drugs is fucking ridiculous on its own would smuggling drugs out of a country warrant it ? Smuggling drugs into a country I can understand but taking them out ? Seems extreme.
Tell that to Pablo Escobar, El Chapo, and the like that were drug kingpins in their own countries. Escobar is dead and El Chapo is on trial facing life in prison here in the U.S.


And yes, I know they are big time drug dealers, but with drug dealing comes a lot of violence to keep it going. How many people was Escobar personally responsible for ordering killed in the form of other drug dealers, police officers, military personnel and others all the way up to high ranking politicians who had vowed a war on drugs.

Fact is, drug smuggling is a serious crime and if countries place the death penalty on it for doing so, then it is the drug smuggler's decision if they wish to risk it.
 
Jun 3, 2013
477
Tell that to Pablo Escobar, El Chapo, and the like that were drug kingpins in their own countries. Escobar is dead and El Chapo is on trial facing life in prison here in the U.S.


And yes, I know they are big time drug dealers, but with drug dealing comes a lot of violence to keep it going. How many people was Escobar personally responsible for ordering killed in the form of other drug dealers, police officers, military personnel and others all the way up to high ranking politicians who had vowed a war on drugs.

Fact is, drug smuggling is a serious crime and if countries place the death penalty on it for doing so, then it is the drug smuggler's decision if they wish to risk it.
Well if the stuff wasn't illegal there wouldn't be problems with people like those. Just like if prohibition had not of been enacted you probably would've never heard of Al Capone.
 
May 17, 2013
8,823
Louisiana
Well if the stuff wasn't illegal there wouldn't be problems with people like those. Just like if prohibition had not of been enacted you probably would've never heard of Al Capone.
So, are you saying your solution would be to legalize Class A narcotics???? Not sure what point you're trying to make as it seem like comparing apples to oranges.
 
Reactions: Nigelbro
Jun 10, 2013
1,676
Speaking of WW1, this photo depicts the result of one of the largest man-made explosions prior to the nuclear age:



During the Battle of Messines, Allied (mostly Aussie) engineers tunneled under a German hilltop position and planted 400 tons of explosives beneath it. 10,000 Germans (along with the entire hill) were instantly obliterated when the mines were detonated.

Prior to detonation, British Major-General Charles Harington predicted, "I do not know whether or not we shall change history tomorrow, but we shall certainly alter geography."
 
Jun 10, 2013
1,676
This eerie photograph shows the vehicle - and virtual tomb - of photographer Reid Blackburn:



Blackburn was positioned at the base of Mt. Saint Helens during its famous 1980 eruption. His vehicle (with him inside) was quickly overwhelmed by a pyroclastic flow that raced down the mountainside at several hundred miles per hour, even faster than the speed of sound.
 

WaltzingMatilda

head like a beaten favourite
Nov 29, 2015
681
Sydney “Orstralia”
Speaking of WW1, this photo depicts the result of one of the largest man-made explosions prior to the nuclear age:



During the Battle of Messines, Allied (mostly Aussie) engineers tunneled under a German hilltop position and planted 400 tons of explosives beneath it. 10,000 Germans (along with the entire hill) were instantly obliterated when the mines were detonated.

Prior to detonation, British Major-General Charles Harington predicted, "I do not know whether or not we shall change history tomorrow, but we shall certainly alter geography."




Very good film on the subject, one most of you have probably never seen