Eerie/creepy photos. **UPDATED** - Challenger.

Jul 6, 2019
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Pretty daft to involve iq in it. Some of the hugest iq people believe the most obvious bullshit
True, (Newton was a big Christian for example, a lot of top scientists are also still religious), but probably at a lower rate than thickos. Wouldn't you agree?

Also, if the majority of people, including most intelligent and knowledgeable people, believe something, then you would need a good reason to go against them.

Hard facts from a good source, a startling new discovery, that sort of thing. Something you could easily, and openly, reference, if you didn't believe in the holocaust for example.
 

Joe

Jun 3, 2012
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I am sure there are many different reasons why people don't believe the official story. I believe it ( not sure it is 6 million exactly ) but I don't think that makes me better than everyone who believe differently.
Someone correct me if I'm wrong but the 6 million figure is "wrong" to clarify I believe it was some 15 million people that died in the camps and out of those 6 million where jews., Yeah I know it just makes it even worse...
 
Jun 4, 2013
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Are you really second guessing the logic of a group that believe their prophet visited heaven on a flying horse?
Hey they rode unicorns in space on the top of star destroyers in the latest SW. Who are you to say a man that married and shoved his cock in the mouth of his 9 year old wife cant ride a flying horse into the clouds and pass on messages from the creator of all life?
 

Icemmann

Breakin it down.
May 16, 2013
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The tree outside GABBY'S room
This is why we can't have nice things.


Serial killer Harvey Glatman would pose as a photographer to lure them into his home where he would later rape and murder them, taking pictures the whole time. This photo shows one of the women, Judith Dull, who became his first victim in 1957.





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Another victim, Ruth Mercado

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And another, Shirley Bridgeford.

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Right up until the 1960s, indigenous Australians were legally considered animals, which opened the door for brutal and inhumane treatment like the kind depicted in this photograph.

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Reactions: NSFW and Trail
Jun 3, 2013
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This is why we can't have nice things.


Serial killer Harvey Glatman would pose as a photographer to lure them into his home where he would later rape and murder them, taking pictures the whole time. This photo shows one of the women, Judith Dull, who became his first victim in 1957.





View attachment 9387

View attachment 9389


Another victim, Ruth Mercado

View attachment 9390

And another, Shirley Bridgeford.

View attachment 9391
Don't like the dead ones.

Anymore of the ones alive?

For research purposes obviously.
 
May 22, 2013
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Australia
Right up until the 1960s, indigenous Australians were legally considered animals, which opened the door for brutal and inhumane treatment like the kind depicted in this photograph.

View attachment 9388
I’ve posted about this before in here.
It’s disgusting the way the indigenous people of Australia were treated but it seems to often fly under the radar on the world scene as people focus a lot on slavery in the US and what not.

Also the 1960’s wasn’t really that long ago! So it drives me insane when people here try to use the whole “well that was ages ago! Get over it!” Excuse and can’t understand why indigenous communities still struggle in parts of Australia today.

For example, it was 1967 that the referendum was held to start counting Indigenous Australians as human. My father was born in 57. So he hit double digits in age before he was classified as human. My pop was a full grown man. My family is directly connected to this kind of bullshit within a current generation.
If my pop wasn’t “human” how easy do we think it would of been for him to not get an education, work and the necessities to support a family? How quick could that have rolled onto my Dad? Just because the law changed in 67 doesn’t means people’s attitudes did at the same time. Few things go different for Pop and my dad then what do you know, I’m left behind possibly in poverty, poorly educated etc.

Thankfully that kind of thing didn’t happen for my family but it quite easily could have and unfortunately has happened countless times all over the country
 
May 25, 2013
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I’ve posted about this before in here.
It’s disgusting the way the indigenous people of Australia were treated but it seems to often fly under the radar on the world scene as people focus a lot on slavery in the US and what not.

Also the 1960’s wasn’t really that long ago! So it drives me insane when people here try to use the whole “well that was ages ago! Get over it!” Excuse and can’t understand why indigenous communities still struggle in parts of Australia today.

For example, it was 1967 that the referendum was held to start counting Indigenous Australians as human. My father was born in 57. So he hit double digits in age before he was classified as human. My pop was a full grown man. My family is directly connected to this kind of bullshit within a current generation.
If my pop wasn’t “human” how easy do we think it would of been for him to not get an education, work and the necessities to support a family? How quick could that have rolled onto my Dad? Just because the law changed in 67 doesn’t means people’s attitudes did at the same time. Few things go different for Pop and my dad then what do you know, I’m left behind possibly in poverty, poorly educated etc.

Thankfully that kind of thing didn’t happen for my family but it quite easily could have and unfortunately has happened countless times all over the country
And John Howard was involved in politics since the late 50s.
 

Icemmann

Breakin it down.
May 16, 2013
11,522
4,480
41
The tree outside GABBY'S room
I’ve posted about this before in here.
It’s disgusting the way the indigenous people of Australia were treated but it seems to often fly under the radar on the world scene as people focus a lot on slavery in the US and what not.

Also the 1960’s wasn’t really that long ago! So it drives me insane when people here try to use the whole “well that was ages ago! Get over it!” Excuse and can’t understand why indigenous communities still struggle in parts of Australia today.

For example, it was 1967 that the referendum was held to start counting Indigenous Australians as human. My father was born in 57. So he hit double digits in age before he was classified as human. My pop was a full grown man. My family is directly connected to this kind of bullshit within a current generation.
If my pop wasn’t “human” how easy do we think it would of been for him to not get an education, work and the necessities to support a family? How quick could that have rolled onto my Dad? Just because the law changed in 67 doesn’t means people’s attitudes did at the same time. Few things go different for Pop and my dad then what do you know, I’m left behind possibly in poverty, poorly educated etc.

Thankfully that kind of thing didn’t happen for my family but it quite easily could have and unfortunately has happened countless times all over the country
Same shit here in the states. Civil Rights act didn't pass until 1966.
 
Apr 7, 2014
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California Statehood and Genocide

In the latter half of the 19th century Californian state and federal authorities, incited[35][36] aided and financed miners, settlers, ranchers, and people's militias to enslave, kidnap, murder, and exterminate a major proportion of displaced Native American Indians. The latter were sometimes contemptuously referred to as "Diggers," for their practice of digging up roots to eat. Many of the same policies of violence were used here against the indigenous population as the United States had done throughout its territory.[37][38][39][40][41][42][43]

Simultaneous to the ongoing extermination, reports of the decimation of Native Americans were made to the rest of the United States and internationally.[note 1]

The California Act for the Government and Protection of Indians was enacted in 1850 (amended 1860, repealed 1863). This law provided for "apprenticing" or indenturing Indian children to Whites, and also punished "vagrant" Indians by "hiring" them out to the highest bidder at a public auction if the Indian could not provide sufficient bond or bail. This legalized a form of slavery in California.[44] 24,000 to 27,000 California Native Americans were taken as forced laborers by white settlers, including 4,000 to 7,000 children.[4]

A notable early eyewitness testimony and account: "The Indians of California" 1864, is from John Ross Browne, Customs official and Inspector of Indian Affairs on the Pacific Coast. He systematically described the fraud, corruption, land theft, slavery, rape, and massacre perpetrated on a substantial portion of the aboriginal population.[45] This was confirmed by a contemporary, Superintendent Dorcas J. Spencer.[46]

By one estimate, at least 4,500 Californian Indians were killed between 1849 and 1870.[2] Contemporary historian Benjamin Madley has documented the numbers of Californian Indians killed between 1846 and 1873; he estimates that during this period at least 9,492 to 16,092 Californian Indians were killed by non-Indians. Most of the deaths took place in what he defined as more than 370 massacres (defined as the "intentional killing of five or more disarmed combatants or largely unarmed noncombatants, including women, children, and prisoners, whether in the context of a battle or otherwise").[1] Professor Ed Castillo, of Sonoma State University, estimates that more were killed: "The handiwork of these well armed death squads combined with the widespread random killing of Indians by individual miners resulted in the death of 100,000 Indians in the first two years of the gold rush."[3]

List of recorded massacres Edit
Year Date Name Current location Description Reported casualties Claimants
1846 April 6 Sacramento River massacre California Captain John C. Frémont's men attacked a band of Indians (probably Wintun) on the Sacramento River in California, killing between 120 and 200 Indians. 120–200 [47]
1846 May 12 Klamath Lake massacre California Captain John C. Frémont's men, led by Kit Carson attacked a village of Klamath Indians) on the banks of Klamath Lake, killing at least 14 Klamath people. 14+ [48]
1846 June Sutter Buttes massacre California Captain John C. Frémont's men attacked a rancheria on the banks of the Sacramento River near Sutter Buttes, killing several Patwin people. 14+ [48]
1846 December Pauma massacre California 11 Californios were killed by Indians at Escondido, California, leading to the Temecula massacre. 11 (settlers) [49]
1846 December Temecula massacre California 33 to 40 Indians killed in revenge for the Pauma Massacre at Escondido, California. 33–40 [49]
1847 March Rancheria Tulea massacre California White slavers retaliate to a slave escape by massacring five Indians in Rancheria Tulea. 5 [48]
1847 March 29 Kern and Sutter massacres California In response to a plea from White settlers to put an end to raids, U.S. Army Captain Edward Kern and rancher John Sutter led 50 men in attacks on three Indian villages. 20 [48]
1847 late June/early July Konkow Maidu slaver massacre California Slavers kill 12–20 Konkow Maidu Indians in the process of capturing 30 members of the tribe for the purpose of forced slavery. 12–20 [48]
1850 May 15 Bloody Island massacre California Nathaniel Lyon and his U.S. Army detachment of cavalry killed 60–100 Pomo people on Bo-no-po-ti island near Clear Lake, (Lake Co., California); they believed the Pomo had killed two Clear Lake settlers who had been abusing and murdering Pomo people. (The Island Pomo had no connections to the enslaved Pomo). This incident led to a general outbreak of settler attacks against and mass killing of native people all over Northern California. Site is California Registered Historical Landmark #427 60–100 [50][51][52]
1851 January 11 Mariposa War California The gold rush increased pressure on the Native Americans of California, because miners forced Native Americans off their gold-rich lands. Many were pressed into service in the mines; others had their villages raided by the army and volunteer militia. Some Native American tribes fought back, beginning with the Ahwahnechees and the Chowchilla in the Sierra Nevada and San Joaquin Valley leading a raid on the Fresno River post of James D. Savage, in December 1850. In retaliation Mariposa County Sheriff James Burney led local militia in an indecisive clash with the natives on January 11, 1851 on a mountainside near present-day Oakhurst, California. 40+
1851 Old Shasta Town California Miners killed 300 Wintu Indians near Old Shasta, California and burned down their tribal council meeting house. 300 [53]
1852 April 23 Bridge Gulch massacre California 70 American men led by Trinity County sheriff William H. Dixon killed more than 150 Wintu people in the Hayfork Valley of California, in retaliation for the killing of Col. John Anderson. 150 [54]
1852 November Wright massacre California White settlers led by a notorious Indian hunter named Ben Wright massacred 41 Modocs during a "peace parley." 41 [55]
1853 Howonquet massacre California Californian settlers attacked and burned the Tolowa village of Howonquet, massacring 70 people. 70 [56]
1853 Yontoket Massacre California A posse of settlers attacked and burned a Tolowa rancheria at Yontocket, California, killing 450 Tolowa during a prayer ceremony. 450 [57][58]
1853 Achulet Massacre California White settlers launched an attack on a Tolowa village near Lake Earl in California, killing between 65 and 150 Indians at dawn. 65–150 [59]
1853 Before December 31 "Ox" incident California U.S. forces attacked and killed an unreported number of Indians in the Four Creeks area (Tulare County, California) in what was referred to by officers as "our little difficulty" and "the chastisement they have received". [60]
1855 January 22 Klamath River massacres California In retaliation for the murder of six settlers and the theft of some cattle, whites commenced a "war of extermination against the Indians" in Humboldt County, California. [61]
1856 March Shingletown California In reprisal for Indian stock theft, white settlers massacred at least 20 Yana men, women, and children near Shingletown, California. 20 [62]
1856–1859 Round Valley Settler Massacres California White settlers killed over a thousand Yuki Indians in Round Valley over the course of three years in an uncountable number of separate massacres. 1,000+ [63][64]
1859–1860 Jarboe's War California White settlers calling themselves the "Eel River Rangers," led by Walter Jarboe, killed at least 283 Indian men and countless women and children in 23 engagements over the course of six months. They were reimbursed by the U.S. government for their campaign. 283+ [63]
1859 September Pit River California White settlers massacred 70 Achomawi Indians (10 men and 60 women and children) in their village on the Pit River in California. 70 [65]
1859 Chico Creek California White settlers attacked a Maidu camp near Chico Creek in California, killing indiscriminately 40 Indians. 40 [66]
1860 Exact date unknown Massacre at Bloody Rock California A group of 65 Yuki Indians were surrounded and massacred by white settlers at Bloody Rock, in Mendocino County, California. 65 [67]
1860 February 26 Indian Island massacre California In three nearly simultaneous assaults on the Wiyot, at Indian Island, Eureka, Rio Dell, and near Hydesville, California, white settlers killed between 80 and 250 Wiyot in Humboldt County, California. Victims were mostly women, children, and elders, as reported by Bret Harte at Arcata newspaper. Other villages were massacred within two days. The main site is National Register of Historic Places in the United States #66000208. 80–250 [68][69][70][71]
1863 April 19 Keyesville massacre California American militia and members of the California cavalry killed 35 Tübatulabal men in Kern County, California. 35 [72]
1863 August 28 Konkow Trail of Tears California On August 1863 all Konkow Maidu were to be sent to the Bidwell Ranch in Chico and then be taken to the Round Valley Reservation at Covelo in Mendocino County. Any Indians remaining in the area were to be shot. Maidu were rounded up and marched under guard west out of the Sacramento Valley and through to the Coastal Range. 461 Native Americans started the trek, 277 finished.[73] They reached the Round Valley on 18 September 1863. 184 [73]
1864 Oak Run massacre California California settlers massacred 300 Yana Indians who had gathered near the head of Oak Run, California for a spiritual ceremony. 300 [74]
1865 Owens Lake massacre California White vigilantes attacked a Paiute camp on Owens Lake in California, killing about 40 men, women, and children. 40 [75]
1865 Three Knolls massacre California White settlers massacred a Yana community at Three Knolls on the Mill Creek, California. [76][77]
1868 Campo Seco California A posse of white settlers massacred 33 Yahis in a cave north of Mill Creek, California. 33 [78][79]
1871 Kingsley Cave massacre California 4 settlers killed 30 Yahi Indians in Tehama County, California about two miles from Wild Horse Corral in the Ishi Wilderness. It is estimated that this massacre left only 15 members of the Yahi tribe alive. 30 [80]