Eerie/creepy photos. **UPDATED** - Challenger.

Setanta

BAD MOTHERFUCKER
May 24, 2013
7,200
2,621
Emain Macha
Hey they rode unicorns in space on the top of star destroyers in the latest SW. Who are you to say a man that married and shoved his cock in the mouth of his 9 year old wife cant ride a flying horse into the clouds and pass on messages from the creator of all life?
Remember Salman Rushdie ?

You need to be careful or they'll fatwa you. :smile
 

Bachafach^^^

ANTIFA
Dec 6, 2019
1,338
1,089
19
Varaždin
I’ve posted about this before in here.
It’s disgusting the way the indigenous people of Australia were treated but it seems to often fly under the radar on the world scene as people focus a lot on slavery in the US and what not.

Also the 1960’s wasn’t really that long ago! So it drives me insane when people here try to use the whole “well that was ages ago! Get over it!” Excuse and can’t understand why indigenous communities still struggle in parts of Australia today.

For example, it was 1967 that the referendum was held to start counting Indigenous Australians as human. My father was born in 57. So he hit double digits in age before he was classified as human. My pop was a full grown man. My family is directly connected to this kind of bullshit within a current generation.
If my pop wasn’t “human” how easy do we think it would of been for him to not get an education, work and the necessities to support a family? How quick could that have rolled onto my Dad? Just because the law changed in 67 doesn’t means people’s attitudes did at the same time. Few things go different for Pop and my dad then what do you know, I’m left behind possibly in poverty, poorly educated etc.

Thankfully that kind of thing didn’t happen for my family but it quite easily could have and unfortunately has happened countless times all over the country
Speaking of and slightly OT, has anyone seen Nightingale? It's set during the British Empires genocide of the Aboriginals in Tasmania It's made by the same woman who made Babadook. Supposed to be particularly brutal

 
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Reactions: Super_Fly_Sam

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
36,828
13,584
In 1982, an unknown person in Chicago contaminated bottles of Tylenol (a paracetamol) with cyanide and then put them back on supermarket and pharmacy shelves.


Seven people died, including a 12 year old girl and, in another incident, three members of the same family died. Nobody was ever charged or convicted of the killings, though a guy did go to jail for 13 years for sending a letter trying to extort $1 million from Johnson and Johnson. A lot of people think that he's the guy and the cops just didn't have enough to charge him with anything.

There's a lot of interesting stuff in this case. Police driving around Chicago with bullhorns, yelling at people not to take Tylenol. Johnson and Johnson recalled a quarter of a billion dollars (today's money) in Tylenol. Capsule design and tamper-proof packaging both radically changing because of this case. It's interesting stuff. Worth reading up on.

Anyway, here's a photo of one of the victims, Paula Prince, buying Tylenol on the night she died. Police believe the bearded man watching her from the background is the killer.



:hat
 
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CamelCase

Teak Tough
Staff member
May 21, 2013
1,259
450
In 1982, an unknown person in Chicago contaminated bottles of Tylenol (a paracetamol) with cyanide and then put them back on supermarket and pharmacy shelves.


Seven people died, including a 12 year old girl and, in another incident, three members of the same family died. Nobody was ever charged or convicted of the killings, though a guy did go to jail for 13 years for sending a letter trying to extort $1 million from Johnson and Johnson. A lot of people think that he's the guy and the cops just didn't have enough to charge him with anything.

There's a lot of interesting stuff in this case. Police driving around Chicago with bullhorns, yelling at people not to take Tylenol. Johnson and Johnson recalled a quarter of a billion dollars (today's money) in Tylenol. Capsule design and tamper-proof packaging both radically changing because of this case. It's interesting stuff. Worth reading up on.

Anyway, here's a photo of one of the victims, Paula Prince, buying Tylenol on the night she died. Police believe the bearded man watching her from the background is the killer.



:hat
The laws brought in after this case were first used to convict Stella Nickell to 90 years in prison after she tampered with her husbands medication for the life insurance payout, she also tampered with bottles in other stores to cover up her crimes resulting in the death of one other person. Interestingly she was convicted of the federal charge of product tampering that caused death and not murder.

 

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
36,828
13,584
Not as intense as the usual update, but just a quick post on something I found interesting.

@Trail @Bart

Ancient Greeks and Romans loved their dogs, and often referred to them as "foster children". When a man's dog died, he would often make a grave for it and write an epitaph. Wealthy Romans might commission a mosaic to commemorate their departed companion. Some have survived the centuries.

















Examples of surviving epitaphs /memorial poems for an ancient's canine companion. Interesting how freely they speak of weeping for their dog:

“To Helena, foster child, soul without comparison and deserving of praise.”



"My eyes were wet with tears, our little dog, when I bore you [to the grave]. So, Patricus, never again shall you give me a thousand kisses. Never can you be contentedly in my lap. In sadness, I buried you, as you deserve. In a resting place of marble, I have put you for all time by the side of my shade. In your qualities, you were sagacious, like a human being. Ah, what a loved companion we have lost!”


"Myia never barked without reason, but now, he is silent.”



" Surely, even as you lie dead in this tomb, I deem the wild beasts yet fear your white bones, huntress Lycas; and your valor great Pelion knows, and splendid Ossa and the lonely peaks of Cithaeron.”


(Pelion, Ossa, and Cithaeron are mountains in Greece, perhaps where this dog and her human hunted.)


"This is the tomb of the dog, Stephanos, who perished, whom Rhodope shed tears for and buried like a human. I am the dog Stephanos, and Rhodope set up a tomb for me.”


" I am in tears, while carrying you to your last resting place as much as I rejoiced when bringing you home with my own hands 15 years ago.”



And my favourite:

" You who pass on this path, if you happen to see this monument, laugh not, I pray, though it is a dog’s grave. Tears fell for me, and the dust was heaped above me by a master’s hand.”


:hat
 
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Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
36,828
13,584
Apparently the damage was actually done not by the string, but by the impact of the yo-yo itself smacking into his index finger millions of times. He looped the string around his middle finger.

:hat
 
Reactions: NSFW
Jun 14, 2012
13,834
6,412
Not as intense as the usual update, but just a quick post on something I found interesting.

Ancient Greeks and Romans loved their dogs, and often referred to them as "foster children". When a man's dog died, he would often make a grave for it and write an epitaph. Wealthy Romans might commission a mosaic to commemorate their departed companion. Some have survived the centuries.

















Examples of surviving epitaphs /memorial poems for an ancient's canine companion. Interesting how freely they speak of weeping for their dog:

“To Helena, foster child, soul without comparison and deserving of praise.”



"My eyes were wet with tears, our little dog, when I bore you [to the grave]. So, Patricus, never again shall you give me a thousand kisses. Never can you be contentedly in my lap. In sadness, I buried you, as you deserve. In a resting place of marble, I have put you for all time by the side of my shade. In your qualities, you were sagacious, like a human being. Ah, what a loved companion we have lost!”


"Myia never barked without reason, but now, he is silent.”



" Surely, even as you lie dead in this tomb, I deem the wild beasts yet fear your white bones, huntress Lycas; and your valor great Pelion knows, and splendid Ossa and the lonely peaks of Cithaeron.”


(Pelion, Ossa, and Cithaeron are mountains in Greece, perhaps where this dog and her human hunted.)


"This is the tomb of the dog, Stephanos, who perished, whom Rhodope shed tears for and buried like a human. I am the dog Stephanos, and Rhodope set up a tomb for me.”


" I am in tears, while carrying you to your last resting place as much as I rejoiced when bringing you home with my own hands 15 years ago.”



And my favourite:

" You who pass on this path, if you happen to see this monument, laugh not, I pray, though it is a dog’s grave. Tears fell for me, and the dust was heaped above me by a master’s hand.”


:hat
Love stuff like this. Almost like a gateway to the past.