Eerie/creepy photos. **UPDATED** - Challenger.

May 17, 2013
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He's killed most of the blood vessels in his index finger from the string on the yo-yo. :thumbsup

:hat
I grew up in the 50's and 60's as a kid and knew tons of guys that played with Yo-Yo's and I can't recall even one that looped that string around their index finger. Everybody I knew, or saw, looped it around their middle finger so they could use their index finger to help control the yo-yo when doing tricks.
 

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
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Love stuff like this. Almost like a gateway to the past.
Yeah it's always weird learning stuff like this. I mean, Roman society was so strange and bizarre to us, and the people were so tough and hardened compared to us...... but then you read a poem that a guy wrote about how devastated he was when his pet dog died, and he's telling everybody what a good boy Stephanos was and how much he'll miss his canine companion and he's buried him in a place of honour, and it's really jolting to realize that they weren't really so different after all. :conf

:hat
 
Last edited:
Jun 14, 2012
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Yeah it's always weird learning stuff like this. I mean, Roman society was so strange and bizarre to us, and the people were so tough and hardened compared to us...... but then you read a poem that a guy wrote about how devastated he was when his pet dog died, and he's telling everybody what a good boy Stephanos was and how much he'll miss his canine companion and he's buried him in a place of honour, and it's really jolting to realize that they weren't really so different after all. :conf

:hat
Yeah man it's interesting. A lot have this impression that we were more barbaric back then for want of a better word and less compassionate, and they'd be right to a degree I suppose but at our core we're still the same.
 
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Joe

Jun 3, 2012
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Not as intense as the usual update, but just a quick post on something I found interesting.

@Trail @Bart

Ancient Greeks and Romans loved their dogs, and often referred to them as "foster children". When a man's dog died, he would often make a grave for it and write an epitaph. Wealthy Romans might commission a mosaic to commemorate their departed companion. Some have survived the centuries.

















Examples of surviving epitaphs /memorial poems for an ancient's canine companion. Interesting how freely they speak of weeping for their dog:

“To Helena, foster child, soul without comparison and deserving of praise.”



"My eyes were wet with tears, our little dog, when I bore you [to the grave]. So, Patricus, never again shall you give me a thousand kisses. Never can you be contentedly in my lap. In sadness, I buried you, as you deserve. In a resting place of marble, I have put you for all time by the side of my shade. In your qualities, you were sagacious, like a human being. Ah, what a loved companion we have lost!”


"Myia never barked without reason, but now, he is silent.”



" Surely, even as you lie dead in this tomb, I deem the wild beasts yet fear your white bones, huntress Lycas; and your valor great Pelion knows, and splendid Ossa and the lonely peaks of Cithaeron.”


(Pelion, Ossa, and Cithaeron are mountains in Greece, perhaps where this dog and her human hunted.)


"This is the tomb of the dog, Stephanos, who perished, whom Rhodope shed tears for and buried like a human. I am the dog Stephanos, and Rhodope set up a tomb for me.”


" I am in tears, while carrying you to your last resting place as much as I rejoiced when bringing you home with my own hands 15 years ago.”



And my favourite:

" You who pass on this path, if you happen to see this monument, laugh not, I pray, though it is a dog’s grave. Tears fell for me, and the dust was heaped above me by a master’s hand.”


:hat
This is perhaps more interesting than it should be, it's so easy to think of people as being so harsh and deprived of feelings just cause they lived in different times that were much tougher compared to ours, but this is just one example that shows they were really not much different from us.
 
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Haggis

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Diary Of A Hiroshima Survivor On August 6, 1945

August 6, 1945 – the sun rose into a clear blue sky over the city of Hiroshima, Japan promising a warm and pleasant day. Nothing in the day’s dawning indicated that this day would be any different from its predecessors. But this day would be different, very different. This day would change the world. On this day a single bomb dropped by a single airplane destroyed the city, leading to the end of World War II and introducing mankind to the Atomic Age.

Dr. Michihiko Hachiya lived through that day and kept a diary of his experience. He served as Director of the Hiroshima Communications Hospital and lived near the hospital approximately a mile from the explosion’s epicenter. His diary was published in English in 1955



“The hour was early; the morning still, warm, and beautiful. Shimmering leaves, reflecting sunlight from a cloudless sky, made a pleasant contrast with shadows in my garden as I gazed absently through wide-flung doors opening to the south.
Clad in drawers and undershirt, I was sprawled on the living room floor exhausted because I had just spent a sleepless night on duty as an air warden in my hospital.
Suddenly, a strong flash of light startled me – and then another. So well does one recall little things that I remember vividly how a stone lantern in the garden became brilliantly lit and I debated whether this light was caused by a magnesium flare or sparks from a passing trolley.

Garden shadows disappeared. The view where a moment before had been so bright and sunny was now dark and hazy. Through swirling dust I could barely discern a wooden column that had supported one comer of my house. It was leaning crazily and the roof sagged dangerously.
Moving instinctively, I tried to escape, but rubble and fallen timbers barred the way. By picking my way cautiously I managed to reach the roka [an outside hallway] and stepped down into my garden. A profound weakness overcame me, so I stopped to regain my strength. To my surprise I discovered that I was completely naked How odd! Where were my drawers and undershirt?
What had happened?
All over the right side of my body I was cut and bleeding. A large splinter was protruding from a mangled wound in my thigh, and something warm trickled into my mouth. My check was torn, I discovered as I felt it gingerly, with the lower lip laid wide open. Embedded in my neck was a sizable fragment of glass which I matter-of-factly dislodged, and with the detachment of one stunned and shocked I studied it and my blood-stained hand.
Where was my wife?
Suddenly thoroughly alarmed, I began to yell for her: ‘Yaeko-san! Yaeko-san! Where are you?’ Blood began to spurt. Had my carotid artery been cut? Would I bleed to death? Frightened and irrational, I called out again ‘It’s a five-hundred-ton bomb! Yaeko-san, where are you? A five- hundred-ton bomb has fallen!’
Yaeko-san, pale and frightened, her clothes torn and blood stained, emerged from the ruins of our house holding her elbow. Seeing her, I was reassured. My own panic assuaged, I tried to reassure her.
‘We’ll be all right,’ I exclaimed. ‘Only let’s get out of here as fast as we can.’
She nodded, and I motioned for her to follow me.”
Dr. Hachiya and his wife make there way to the street. As the homes around them collapse, they realize they must move on, and begin their journey to the hospital a few hundred yards away.
“We started out, but after twenty or thirty steps I had to stop. My breath became short, my heart pounded, and my legs gave way under me. An overpowering thirst seized me and I begged Yaeko-san to find me some water. But there was no water to be found. After a little my strength somewhat returned and we were able to go on.
I was still naked, and although I did not feel the least bit of shame, I was disturbed to realize that modesty had deserted me. On rounding a corner we came upon a soldier standing idly in the street. He had a towel draped across his shoulder, and I asked if he would give it to me to cover my nakedness. The soldier surrendered the towel quite willingly but said not a word. A little later I lost the towel, and Yaeko-san took off her apron and tied it around my loins.
Our progress towards the hospital was interminably slow, until finally, my legs, stiff from drying blood, refused to carry me farther. The strength, even the will, to go on deserted me, so I told my wife, who was almost as badly hurt as I, to go on alone. This she objected to, but there was no choice. She had to go ahead and try to find someone to come back for me.
Yaeko-san looked into my face for a moment, and then, without saying a word, turned away and began running towards the hospital. Once, she looked back and waved and in a moment she was swallowed up in the gloom. It was quite dark now, and with my wife gone, a feeling of dreadful loneliness overcame me.
I must have gone out of my head lying there in the road because the next thing I recall was discovering that the clot on my thigh had been dislodged and blood was again spurting from the wound.
I pressed my hand to the bleeding area and after a while the bleeding stopped and I felt better
Could I go on?
I tried. It was all a nightmare – my wounds, the darkness, the road ahead. My movements were ever so slow; only my mind was running at top speed.
In time I came to an open space where the houses had been removed to make a fire lane. Through the dim light I could make out ahead of me the hazy outlines of the Communications Bureau’s big concrete building, and beyond it the hospital. My spirits rose because I knew that now someone would find me; and if I should die, at least my body would be found. I paused to rest. Gradually things around me came into focus. There were the shadowy forms of people, some of whom looked like walking ghosts. Others moved as though in pain, like scarecrows, their arms held out from their bodies with forearms and hands dangling. These people puzzled me until I suddenly realized that they had been burned and were holding their arms out to prevent the painful friction of raw surfaces rubbing together. A naked woman carrying a naked baby came into view. I averted my gaze. Perhaps they had been in the bath. But then I saw a naked man, and it occurred to me that, like myself, some strange thing had deprived them of their clothes. An old woman lay near me with an expression of suffering on her face; but she made no sound. Indeed, one thing was common to everyone I saw – complete silence.
All who could were moving in the direction of the hospital. I joined in the dismal parade when my strength was somewhat recovered, and at last reached the gates of the Communications Bureau.”

:hat
 

SwollenGoat

Deicide
May 17, 2013
53,339
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The House that Peterbilt
Diary Of A Hiroshima Survivor On August 6, 1945

August 6, 1945 – the sun rose into a clear blue sky over the city of Hiroshima, Japan promising a warm and pleasant day. Nothing in the day’s dawning indicated that this day would be any different from its predecessors. But this day would be different, very different. This day would change the world. On this day a single bomb dropped by a single airplane destroyed the city, leading to the end of World War II and introducing mankind to the Atomic Age.

Dr. Michihiko Hachiya lived through that day and kept a diary of his experience. He served as Director of the Hiroshima Communications Hospital and lived near the hospital approximately a mile from the explosion’s epicenter. His diary was published in English in 1955



“The hour was early; the morning still, warm, and beautiful. Shimmering leaves, reflecting sunlight from a cloudless sky, made a pleasant contrast with shadows in my garden as I gazed absently through wide-flung doors opening to the south.
Clad in drawers and undershirt, I was sprawled on the living room floor exhausted because I had just spent a sleepless night on duty as an air warden in my hospital.
Suddenly, a strong flash of light startled me – and then another. So well does one recall little things that I remember vividly how a stone lantern in the garden became brilliantly lit and I debated whether this light was caused by a magnesium flare or sparks from a passing trolley.

Garden shadows disappeared. The view where a moment before had been so bright and sunny was now dark and hazy. Through swirling dust I could barely discern a wooden column that had supported one comer of my house. It was leaning crazily and the roof sagged dangerously.
Moving instinctively, I tried to escape, but rubble and fallen timbers barred the way. By picking my way cautiously I managed to reach the roka [an outside hallway] and stepped down into my garden. A profound weakness overcame me, so I stopped to regain my strength. To my surprise I discovered that I was completely naked How odd! Where were my drawers and undershirt?
What had happened?
All over the right side of my body I was cut and bleeding. A large splinter was protruding from a mangled wound in my thigh, and something warm trickled into my mouth. My check was torn, I discovered as I felt it gingerly, with the lower lip laid wide open. Embedded in my neck was a sizable fragment of glass which I matter-of-factly dislodged, and with the detachment of one stunned and shocked I studied it and my blood-stained hand.
Where was my wife?
Suddenly thoroughly alarmed, I began to yell for her: ‘Yaeko-san! Yaeko-san! Where are you?’ Blood began to spurt. Had my carotid artery been cut? Would I bleed to death? Frightened and irrational, I called out again ‘It’s a five-hundred-ton bomb! Yaeko-san, where are you? A five- hundred-ton bomb has fallen!’
Yaeko-san, pale and frightened, her clothes torn and blood stained, emerged from the ruins of our house holding her elbow. Seeing her, I was reassured. My own panic assuaged, I tried to reassure her.
‘We’ll be all right,’ I exclaimed. ‘Only let’s get out of here as fast as we can.’
She nodded, and I motioned for her to follow me.”
Dr. Hachiya and his wife make there way to the street. As the homes around them collapse, they realize they must move on, and begin their journey to the hospital a few hundred yards away.
“We started out, but after twenty or thirty steps I had to stop. My breath became short, my heart pounded, and my legs gave way under me. An overpowering thirst seized me and I begged Yaeko-san to find me some water. But there was no water to be found. After a little my strength somewhat returned and we were able to go on.
I was still naked, and although I did not feel the least bit of shame, I was disturbed to realize that modesty had deserted me. On rounding a corner we came upon a soldier standing idly in the street. He had a towel draped across his shoulder, and I asked if he would give it to me to cover my nakedness. The soldier surrendered the towel quite willingly but said not a word. A little later I lost the towel, and Yaeko-san took off her apron and tied it around my loins.
Our progress towards the hospital was interminably slow, until finally, my legs, stiff from drying blood, refused to carry me farther. The strength, even the will, to go on deserted me, so I told my wife, who was almost as badly hurt as I, to go on alone. This she objected to, but there was no choice. She had to go ahead and try to find someone to come back for me.
Yaeko-san looked into my face for a moment, and then, without saying a word, turned away and began running towards the hospital. Once, she looked back and waved and in a moment she was swallowed up in the gloom. It was quite dark now, and with my wife gone, a feeling of dreadful loneliness overcame me.
I must have gone out of my head lying there in the road because the next thing I recall was discovering that the clot on my thigh had been dislodged and blood was again spurting from the wound.
I pressed my hand to the bleeding area and after a while the bleeding stopped and I felt better
Could I go on?
I tried. It was all a nightmare – my wounds, the darkness, the road ahead. My movements were ever so slow; only my mind was running at top speed.
In time I came to an open space where the houses had been removed to make a fire lane. Through the dim light I could make out ahead of me the hazy outlines of the Communications Bureau’s big concrete building, and beyond it the hospital. My spirits rose because I knew that now someone would find me; and if I should die, at least my body would be found. I paused to rest. Gradually things around me came into focus. There were the shadowy forms of people, some of whom looked like walking ghosts. Others moved as though in pain, like scarecrows, their arms held out from their bodies with forearms and hands dangling. These people puzzled me until I suddenly realized that they had been burned and were holding their arms out to prevent the painful friction of raw surfaces rubbing together. A naked woman carrying a naked baby came into view. I averted my gaze. Perhaps they had been in the bath. But then I saw a naked man, and it occurred to me that, like myself, some strange thing had deprived them of their clothes. An old woman lay near me with an expression of suffering on her face; but she made no sound. Indeed, one thing was common to everyone I saw – complete silence.
All who could were moving in the direction of the hospital. I joined in the dismal parade when my strength was somewhat recovered, and at last reached the gates of the Communications Bureau.”

:hat
I think Ive read this someplace else..................a book called Day One maybe?

anyway,the tales told by witnesses to the bomb and the immediate aftermath read like something out of Dante's Inferno........
 

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
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Doomed Challenger crew sit for a crew photo.


Challenger being taken to the launch pad.


Icicles on the launch tower the morning of the launch. The engineers declared the launch conditions to be unsafe and requested a postponement, but were overruled by management. The unseasonably cold overnight had frozen the notorious O-rings and rendered their molecular composition to make them stiff and brittle rather than flexible:





Grey smoke briefly escaping from the right-side solid rocket booster, the first sign of disaster:


Plume on right SRB at T+ 58.788 seconds (15 seconds before the explosion):


Explosion.


Closeup of previous photo, showing the intact crew cabin. The crew were still alive at this point.


Flight director Jay Greene seconds after the explosion, with the live feed visible on the TV in the background:


"At least some of the crew were alive and at least briefly conscious after the breakup, as three of the four recovered Personal Egress Air Packs (PEAPs) on the flight deck were found to have been activated..... Investigators found their remaining unused air supply consistent with the expected consumption during the 2-minute-and-45-second post-breakup trajectory.

While analyzing the wreckage, investigators discovered that several electrical system switches on pilot Mike Smith's right-hand panel had been moved from their usual launch positions. Mike Mullane wrote, "These switches were protected with lever locks that required them to be pulled outward against a spring force before they could be moved to a new position." Later tests established that neither force of the explosion nor the impact with the ocean could have moved them, indicating that Smith made the switch changes, presumably in a futile attempt to restore electrical power to the cockpit after the crew cabin detached from the rest of the orbiter."


It seems anything from very likely to all but certain that at least some of the crew were still alive and probably conscious right up until the moment the crew cabin slammed into the ocean at just over 200mph.

:hat
 
May 22, 2013
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Australia
Doomed Challenger crew sit for a crew photo.


Challenger being taken to the launch pad.


Icicles on the launch tower the morning of the launch. The engineers declared the launch conditions to be unsafe and requested a postponement, but were overruled by management. The unseasonably cold overnight had frozen the notorious O-rings and rendered their molecular composition to make them stiff and brittle rather than flexible:





Grey smoke briefly escaping from the right-side solid rocket booster, the first sign of disaster:


Plume on right SRB at T+ 58.788 seconds (15 seconds before the explosion):


Explosion.


Closeup of previous photo, showing the intact crew cabin. The crew were still alive at this point.


Flight director Jay Greene seconds after the explosion, with the live feed visible on the TV in the background:


"At least some of the crew were alive and at least briefly conscious after the breakup, as three of the four recovered Personal Egress Air Packs (PEAPs) on the flight deck were found to have been activated..... Investigators found their remaining unused air supply consistent with the expected consumption during the 2-minute-and-45-second post-breakup trajectory.

While analyzing the wreckage, investigators discovered that several electrical system switches on pilot Mike Smith's right-hand panel had been moved from their usual launch positions. Mike Mullane wrote, "These switches were protected with lever locks that required them to be pulled outward against a spring force before they could be moved to a new position." Later tests established that neither force of the explosion nor the impact with the ocean could have moved them, indicating that Smith made the switch changes, presumably in a futile attempt to restore electrical power to the cockpit after the crew cabin detached from the rest of the orbiter."


It seems anything from very likely to all but certain that at least some of the crew were still alive and probably conscious right up until the moment the crew cabin slammed into the ocean at just over 200mph.

:hat

Know what were the consequences for the management that overruled the engineers decision to delay the launch? If there were any at all?
 

SwollenGoat

Deicide
May 17, 2013
53,339
14,704
The House that Peterbilt
Doomed Challenger crew sit for a crew photo.


Challenger being taken to the launch pad.


Icicles on the launch tower the morning of the launch. The engineers declared the launch conditions to be unsafe and requested a postponement, but were overruled by management. The unseasonably cold overnight had frozen the notorious O-rings and rendered their molecular composition to make them stiff and brittle rather than flexible:





Grey smoke briefly escaping from the right-side solid rocket booster, the first sign of disaster:


Plume on right SRB at T+ 58.788 seconds (15 seconds before the explosion):


Explosion.


Closeup of previous photo, showing the intact crew cabin. The crew were still alive at this point.


Flight director Jay Greene seconds after the explosion, with the live feed visible on the TV in the background:


"At least some of the crew were alive and at least briefly conscious after the breakup, as three of the four recovered Personal Egress Air Packs (PEAPs) on the flight deck were found to have been activated..... Investigators found their remaining unused air supply consistent with the expected consumption during the 2-minute-and-45-second post-breakup trajectory.

While analyzing the wreckage, investigators discovered that several electrical system switches on pilot Mike Smith's right-hand panel had been moved from their usual launch positions. Mike Mullane wrote, "These switches were protected with lever locks that required them to be pulled outward against a spring force before they could be moved to a new position." Later tests established that neither force of the explosion nor the impact with the ocean could have moved them, indicating that Smith made the switch changes, presumably in a futile attempt to restore electrical power to the cockpit after the crew cabin detached from the rest of the orbiter."


It seems anything from very likely to all but certain that at least some of the crew were still alive and probably conscious right up until the moment the crew cabin slammed into the ocean at just over 200mph.

:hat
I was in school in mass the day of the launch and they had wheeled in TV sets so we could watch in class.............the New England connection being a big deal at the time...........

twas fucked the fuck up
 
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May 17, 2013
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I was in school in mass the day of the launch and they had wheeled in TV sets so we could watch in class.............the New England connection being a big deal at the time...........

twas fucked the fuck up
I was at the house and turned it on not long before the actual launch and when that thing blew and littered the sky with debris, I knew it was not going to be a good day for those poor souls. Then to find out later on that some of them likely survived up to the time of hitting the water put new meaning to "your life flashing before your eyes" and knowing there is no way in hell you're going to survive that impact.
 

kf3

Jul 17, 2012
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South London
Know what were the consequences for the management that overruled the engineers decision to delay the launch? If there were any at all?

nope, i don't remember exactly why, the issue was complicated because the company that made the rings didn't communicate with nasa very well so maybe nasa didn't have the best info to make that decision..
 

hazza

wasted chemist
Sep 2, 2013
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sad thing is, they were warned about this well before it happened.

nasa engineers were telling launch controllers beforehand not to launch because of the cold.

the o-rings won't seal properly as they are brittle, they knew this would potentially cause an accident.

they were overruled.
 
May 17, 2013
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Louisiana

Creepy Killer barely moves at all during 2 hour interrogation

I saw the true crime type show that featured his victim and him being interviewed by a reporter as being a "concerned neighbor" since he and the victim lived in the same complex and also attended classes together at a local college.

He came off as totally weird, with a very creepy vibe in the interview and when the reporter mentioned the police had found a body, he really got uncomfortable and shut down the taping. He was arrested shortly afterwards when things started pointing to him being the perp.