Eerie/creepy photos. **UPDATED** - Misc update.

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
34,185
11,459
Man, I'm starting to think Bundy was just misunderstood. Wrong place, wrong time.
Lotta wrong places and wrong times in all different states all across the country. :lol:

:hat
 
Jun 6, 2013
2,258
478
Socal
Said it several times throughout the course of this thread, but goddammit this thread is incredible in so many ways. Needs to be archived in a museum or something.
 
Reactions: Trail and NSFW

WaltzingMatilda

racist on the way to being banned
Nov 29, 2015
1,286
405
Sydney “Orstralia”
Mexico is very non-PC. We don't take ourselves or others seriously whatsoever. It's a very relaxed culture and nothing like what's seen here in modern America and especially (from what I'm reading) modern Europe.

I mean we don't even call each other by our names. We all have a nickname that are just ridiculous. Nothing badass like boxers call themselves. Just ridiculous shit like "mocos," "pelos," etc.


Nicknames???

Wow, you crazy kids
 
Reactions: cat_funt
Jun 4, 2012
27,483
18,009
Circumstantial man. Literally the definition of it.

Where is the real hard evidence? His DNA at crime scenes?
More than that. The issue was that different police forces did not communicate, so as insane as it seems...the murders he went on trial for could not call as witness a woman he attacked and abducted, but who escaped, from a different state. Then the circumstantial evidence becomes so overwhelming that it's impossible to ignore. Aside from the regular abductions and murders in a place stopping as soon as he moved, you have the fact that he was caught with handcuffs, tights, a ski-mask, ice-pick and rope in a car identical to the one seen at multiple abductions and identical to the one that a man who had introduced himself as "Ted" had had when asking other women to help him put things in the boot.

The abductor often had a arm in plaster or was on crutches, and his girlfriend admitted to police that he had slings, crutches and plaster of paris in the house.

Then you have hairs from three different missing women found in his car, and leaflets with places circled that were the location of abductions of women who were never seen again. His excuses were laughably poor, and the sketch of a suspect from one abduction that was made from eye witness accounts was recognised by his coworker, girlfriend and two other people as him.

In court he then represented himself at times and would ask police to repeatedly describe the murder scenes and how the bodies looked, to the point that the judge stepped in and told him to stop asking the same questions as the officer had already described it multiple times...clearly he was getting off on it.

And he fiercely resisted having the mould of his teeth taken.

It's not DNA obviously, but when you look at it all together, it's compelling.
 
May 19, 2013
16,588
6,317
More than that. The issue was that different police forces did not communicate, so as insane as it seems...the murders he went on trial for could not call as witness a woman he attacked and abducted, but who escaped, from a different state. Then the circumstantial evidence becomes so overwhelming that it's impossible to ignore. Aside from the regular abductions and murders in a place stopping as soon as he moved, you have the fact that he was caught with handcuffs, tights, a ski-mask, ice-pick and rope in a car identical to the one seen at multiple abductions and identical to the one that a man who had introduced himself as "Ted" had had when asking other women to help him put things in the boot.

The abductor often had a arm in plaster or was on crutches, and his girlfriend admitted to police that he had slings, crutches and plaster of paris in the house.

Then you have hairs from three different missing women found in his car, and leaflets with places circled that were the location of abductions of women who were never seen again. His excuses were laughably poor, and the sketch of a suspect from one abduction that was made from eye witness accounts was recognised by his coworker, girlfriend and two other people as him.

In court he then represented himself at times and would ask police to repeatedly describe the murder scenes and how the bodies looked, to the point that the judge stepped in and told him to stop asking the same questions as the officer had already described it multiple times...clearly he was getting off on it.

And he fiercely resisted having the mould of his teeth taken.

It's not DNA obviously, but when you look at it all together, it's compelling.
I remember watching that video of him in court cross-questioning the cop. It was so weird. I don't know how the cop didn't tell him to go fuck himself.
 
Reactions: Strike
May 17, 2013
9,426
7,201
Louisiana
More than that. The issue was that different police forces did not communicate, so as insane as it seems...the murders he went on trial for could not call as witness a woman he attacked and abducted, but who escaped, from a different state. Then the circumstantial evidence becomes so overwhelming that it's impossible to ignore. Aside from the regular abductions and murders in a place stopping as soon as he moved, you have the fact that he was caught with handcuffs, tights, a ski-mask, ice-pick and rope in a car identical to the one seen at multiple abductions and identical to the one that a man who had introduced himself as "Ted" had had when asking other women to help him put things in the boot.

The abductor often had a arm in plaster or was on crutches, and his girlfriend admitted to police that he had slings, crutches and plaster of paris in the house.

Then you have hairs from three different missing women found in his car, and leaflets with places circled that were the location of abductions of women who were never seen again. His excuses were laughably poor, and the sketch of a suspect from one abduction that was made from eye witness accounts was recognised by his coworker, girlfriend and two other people as him.

In court he then represented himself at times and would ask police to repeatedly describe the murder scenes and how the bodies looked, to the point that the judge stepped in and told him to stop asking the same questions as the officer had already described it multiple times...clearly he was getting off on it.

And he fiercely resisted having the mould of his teeth taken.

It's not DNA obviously, but when you look at it all together, it's compelling.

Then add to all that the jailhouse bargaining with the cops, DA's and others to offer confessions of more murders he committed to try to put off his date with "Old Sparky" on Florida's Death Row.

In the end he was grasping at straws to save his own worthless hide in any way possible. No doubt in most reasonable thinking people's minds that he killed those women, and wouldn't have stopped until he died or was caught.
 
Jun 4, 2012
27,483
18,009
In the end he was grasping at straws to save his own worthless hide in any way possible. No doubt in most reasonable thinking people's minds that he killed those women, and wouldn't have stopped until he died or was caught.
Absolutely, it was everything to him. Just look at the fact that after escaping the second time...he immediately goes on a killing spree. It was more of a compulsion to him than having sex is for most men. It appears to have been everything to him, to the extent that even when he is there in court with either freedom or the death penalty on the line, he could not stop himself from asking over and over about the crime scenes, because his desire to get off on the details overrode any common sense about appearing innocent.
 
Mar 23, 2019
46
57




It was a scorching afternoon in Berkeley, California, on the 29th of September, 1978. 15-year-old Mary Vincent was a promising dancer. Having worked front stage at the Lido de Paris in Las Vegas, as well as in Australia and Hawaii, her future was certainly looking bright. On that fateful afternoon, Mary decided she was going to run away from home. Her parents were going through a divorce and she needed some time alone. Los Angeles was the destination, she decided.

As she pointed her thumb towards the hazy California sun, a blue van rolled to a halt beside her. Behind the wheel was former merchant marine seaman, Lawrence Singleton, a relatively unsuspecting looking man with grandfatherly features. Singleton offered to drive Mary to Interstate 5 to which she readily accepted.

As they approached Interstate 5, Singleton continued to drive. When Mary realised that he had passed the turn off, she grabbed a pointed surveyor stick that was sitting beside the passenger seat and demanded he turn the car around. Singleton told Mary that it was an honest mistake and turned the car around to head baxk towards Interstate 5.

A few miles down the road, Singleton pulled the car in at the side of the road and told Mary he needed to use urinate and that he couldn’t wait to the nearest gas station. Mary decided to get out of the car for a breath of fresh air. As she was tying her lace, Singleton crept up from behind and cracked her over the head with a hammer.

After brutally raping and sodomising the teenager, Singleton severed both of her arms with a hatchet. He then threw her down a 30 foot culvert in Del Puerto Canyon in Stanislaus County and left her for dead. As Singleton sped off, he believed that he had killed Mary and that nobody would ever be able to find her. He was wrong.

The following morning, two women came across a ghastly sight: Mary Vincent was stumbling down the road, nude, holding what remained of her mutilated arms up in the air. “She was holding up her arms so that the muscles and blood would not fall out,” read the court documents.1

She was rushed to hospital where she was able to provide a detailed description of Singleton. The composite sketch was so realistic that Singleton’s neighbour recognised him and called police immediately.
Under the ridiculously lenient laws at the time, Singleton was sentenced to just 14 years in prison which was the maximum sentence allowed. After serving just eight years and four months of that sentence, Singleton was paroled for “good behaviour.”2 Shortly before his release, his psychiatric evaluation read: “Because he is so out of touch with his hostility and anger, he remains an elevated threat to others’ safety inside and outside prison.” In addition, while incarcerated Singleton had written several letters to Vincent’s lawyer wherein he threatened her. After his parole, Vincent was terrified that he would come back to finish off what he started.

While Mary survived, she didn’t feel like a survivor. After the attack, she fell into a deep depression. She had hopes and dreams of becoming a dancer but her reconstructive surgery rendered her unable to dance ever again. She spent numerous years shuddering at the very thought of that afternoon. She suffered from relentless nightmares and drifted from place to place. She was unable to find a job and couldn’t even afford to have her prosthetic arms fixed; she filed for bankruptcy.

“I never smiled one in 21 years,” Mary said in 1999. By now, however, Mary had met a man named Tom and duo got married. Mary went on to have two sons and she attended the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
So what became of Lawrence Singleton following his release? He moved to Florida after Californian citizens shared their disdain at the thought of him being released back into their community. In fact, numerous protests of his parole were staged across the state. “Drop Dead, Larry” and “Get the maniac out,” read some of their banners.5

A couple of years after his release, a painter called police after witnessing something gruesome through a window of a home he was walking past in Tampa, Florida. The horrified caller said that he saw a nude man raising his arm again and again over a bloody woman who was slouched over his couch. He told police he heard “bones crushing like chicken bones breaking.” When police arrived, they were met by none other than Lawrence Singleton. It was his home and he was covered in blood.

On the sofa inside the living room lay the lifeless body of Roxanne Hayes, a 31-year-old sex worker who had arranged a date with Singleton; he had agreed to pay her $20 for sex. Singleton had stabbed the mother of three to death with a boning knife.6
As news of the murder reached Mary, she knew in her heart that she had to face Singleton once again. While she wasn’t required to testify at his trial, she felt as though she had to. This time she would see that justice is served. “I was raped. I had my arms cut off. He used a hatchet. He left me to die,” Mary told the stunned court room as she pointed towards Singleton with her prosthetic hook.7
Mary’s testimony helped send Singleton to death row where he passed away from cancer in 2001. “I wanted to look into his eyes,” said Mary. “But now I won’t be able to find out whatever I was looking for. I feel like I was cheated again.”8
5442
 
Jun 4, 2012
27,483
18,009




It was a scorching afternoon in Berkeley, California, on the 29th of September, 1978. 15-year-old Mary Vincent was a promising dancer. Having worked front stage at the Lido de Paris in Las Vegas, as well as in Australia and Hawaii, her future was certainly looking bright. On that fateful afternoon, Mary decided she was going to run away from home. Her parents were going through a divorce and she needed some time alone. Los Angeles was the destination, she decided.

As she pointed her thumb towards the hazy California sun, a blue van rolled to a halt beside her. Behind the wheel was former merchant marine seaman, Lawrence Singleton, a relatively unsuspecting looking man with grandfatherly features. Singleton offered to drive Mary to Interstate 5 to which she readily accepted.

As they approached Interstate 5, Singleton continued to drive. When Mary realised that he had passed the turn off, she grabbed a pointed surveyor stick that was sitting beside the passenger seat and demanded he turn the car around. Singleton told Mary that it was an honest mistake and turned the car around to head baxk towards Interstate 5.

A few miles down the road, Singleton pulled the car in at the side of the road and told Mary he needed to use urinate and that he couldn’t wait to the nearest gas station. Mary decided to get out of the car for a breath of fresh air. As she was tying her lace, Singleton crept up from behind and cracked her over the head with a hammer.

After brutally raping and sodomising the teenager, Singleton severed both of her arms with a hatchet. He then threw her down a 30 foot culvert in Del Puerto Canyon in Stanislaus County and left her for dead. As Singleton sped off, he believed that he had killed Mary and that nobody would ever be able to find her. He was wrong.

The following morning, two women came across a ghastly sight: Mary Vincent was stumbling down the road, nude, holding what remained of her mutilated arms up in the air. “She was holding up her arms so that the muscles and blood would not fall out,” read the court documents.1

She was rushed to hospital where she was able to provide a detailed description of Singleton. The composite sketch was so realistic that Singleton’s neighbour recognised him and called police immediately.
Under the ridiculously lenient laws at the time, Singleton was sentenced to just 14 years in prison which was the maximum sentence allowed. After serving just eight years and four months of that sentence, Singleton was paroled for “good behaviour.”2 Shortly before his release, his psychiatric evaluation read: “Because he is so out of touch with his hostility and anger, he remains an elevated threat to others’ safety inside and outside prison.” In addition, while incarcerated Singleton had written several letters to Vincent’s lawyer wherein he threatened her. After his parole, Vincent was terrified that he would come back to finish off what he started.

While Mary survived, she didn’t feel like a survivor. After the attack, she fell into a deep depression. She had hopes and dreams of becoming a dancer but her reconstructive surgery rendered her unable to dance ever again. She spent numerous years shuddering at the very thought of that afternoon. She suffered from relentless nightmares and drifted from place to place. She was unable to find a job and couldn’t even afford to have her prosthetic arms fixed; she filed for bankruptcy.

“I never smiled one in 21 years,” Mary said in 1999. By now, however, Mary had met a man named Tom and duo got married. Mary went on to have two sons and she attended the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
So what became of Lawrence Singleton following his release? He moved to Florida after Californian citizens shared their disdain at the thought of him being released back into their community. In fact, numerous protests of his parole were staged across the state. “Drop Dead, Larry” and “Get the maniac out,” read some of their banners.5

A couple of years after his release, a painter called police after witnessing something gruesome through a window of a home he was walking past in Tampa, Florida. The horrified caller said that he saw a nude man raising his arm again and again over a bloody woman who was slouched over his couch. He told police he heard “bones crushing like chicken bones breaking.” When police arrived, they were met by none other than Lawrence Singleton. It was his home and he was covered in blood.

On the sofa inside the living room lay the lifeless body of Roxanne Hayes, a 31-year-old sex worker who had arranged a date with Singleton; he had agreed to pay her $20 for sex. Singleton had stabbed the mother of three to death with a boning knife.6
As news of the murder reached Mary, she knew in her heart that she had to face Singleton once again. While she wasn’t required to testify at his trial, she felt as though she had to. This time she would see that justice is served. “I was raped. I had my arms cut off. He used a hatchet. He left me to die,” Mary told the stunned court room as she pointed towards Singleton with her prosthetic hook.7
Mary’s testimony helped send Singleton to death row where he passed away from cancer in 2001. “I wanted to look into his eyes,” said Mary. “But now I won’t be able to find out whatever I was looking for. I feel like I was cheated again.”8
View attachment 5442
Fucking disgraceful. I would like to see evidence that the law was unable to pass a stronger sentence, because it was clear attempted murder. Any judge who gives someone a sentence like that for that sort of crime is culpable for further crimes they commit in my eyes, as are the parole board who release them.
 
May 17, 2013
9,426
7,201
Louisiana




It was a scorching afternoon in Berkeley, California, on the 29th of September, 1978. 15-year-old Mary Vincent was a promising dancer. Having worked front stage at the Lido de Paris in Las Vegas, as well as in Australia and Hawaii, her future was certainly looking bright. On that fateful afternoon, Mary decided she was going to run away from home. Her parents were going through a divorce and she needed some time alone. Los Angeles was the destination, she decided.

As she pointed her thumb towards the hazy California sun, a blue van rolled to a halt beside her. Behind the wheel was former merchant marine seaman, Lawrence Singleton, a relatively unsuspecting looking man with grandfatherly features. Singleton offered to drive Mary to Interstate 5 to which she readily accepted.

As they approached Interstate 5, Singleton continued to drive. When Mary realised that he had passed the turn off, she grabbed a pointed surveyor stick that was sitting beside the passenger seat and demanded he turn the car around. Singleton told Mary that it was an honest mistake and turned the car around to head baxk towards Interstate 5.

A few miles down the road, Singleton pulled the car in at the side of the road and told Mary he needed to use urinate and that he couldn’t wait to the nearest gas station. Mary decided to get out of the car for a breath of fresh air. As she was tying her lace, Singleton crept up from behind and cracked her over the head with a hammer.

After brutally raping and sodomising the teenager, Singleton severed both of her arms with a hatchet. He then threw her down a 30 foot culvert in Del Puerto Canyon in Stanislaus County and left her for dead. As Singleton sped off, he believed that he had killed Mary and that nobody would ever be able to find her. He was wrong.

The following morning, two women came across a ghastly sight: Mary Vincent was stumbling down the road, nude, holding what remained of her mutilated arms up in the air. “She was holding up her arms so that the muscles and blood would not fall out,” read the court documents.1

She was rushed to hospital where she was able to provide a detailed description of Singleton. The composite sketch was so realistic that Singleton’s neighbour recognised him and called police immediately.
Under the ridiculously lenient laws at the time, Singleton was sentenced to just 14 years in prison which was the maximum sentence allowed. After serving just eight years and four months of that sentence, Singleton was paroled for “good behaviour.”2 Shortly before his release, his psychiatric evaluation read: “Because he is so out of touch with his hostility and anger, he remains an elevated threat to others’ safety inside and outside prison.” In addition, while incarcerated Singleton had written several letters to Vincent’s lawyer wherein he threatened her. After his parole, Vincent was terrified that he would come back to finish off what he started.

While Mary survived, she didn’t feel like a survivor. After the attack, she fell into a deep depression. She had hopes and dreams of becoming a dancer but her reconstructive surgery rendered her unable to dance ever again. She spent numerous years shuddering at the very thought of that afternoon. She suffered from relentless nightmares and drifted from place to place. She was unable to find a job and couldn’t even afford to have her prosthetic arms fixed; she filed for bankruptcy.

“I never smiled one in 21 years,” Mary said in 1999. By now, however, Mary had met a man named Tom and duo got married. Mary went on to have two sons and she attended the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
So what became of Lawrence Singleton following his release? He moved to Florida after Californian citizens shared their disdain at the thought of him being released back into their community. In fact, numerous protests of his parole were staged across the state. “Drop Dead, Larry” and “Get the maniac out,” read some of their banners.5

A couple of years after his release, a painter called police after witnessing something gruesome through a window of a home he was walking past in Tampa, Florida. The horrified caller said that he saw a nude man raising his arm again and again over a bloody woman who was slouched over his couch. He told police he heard “bones crushing like chicken bones breaking.” When police arrived, they were met by none other than Lawrence Singleton. It was his home and he was covered in blood.

On the sofa inside the living room lay the lifeless body of Roxanne Hayes, a 31-year-old sex worker who had arranged a date with Singleton; he had agreed to pay her $20 for sex. Singleton had stabbed the mother of three to death with a boning knife.6
As news of the murder reached Mary, she knew in her heart that she had to face Singleton once again. While she wasn’t required to testify at his trial, she felt as though she had to. This time she would see that justice is served. “I was raped. I had my arms cut off. He used a hatchet. He left me to die,” Mary told the stunned court room as she pointed towards Singleton with her prosthetic hook.7
Mary’s testimony helped send Singleton to death row where he passed away from cancer in 2001. “I wanted to look into his eyes,” said Mary. “But now I won’t be able to find out whatever I was looking for. I feel like I was cheated again.”8
View attachment 5442
That SOB should have never been released back into the public so he could do that crap all over again. Only that time, he killed his victim.

Hats off to that young lady for having the will to survive that horrific ordeal and do her best to carry on with her life. I can't imagine the nightmares she suffered over the years over what that asshole did to her.

He got off easy.
 
Jun 2, 2012
4,236
2,830
Letterkenny, Ireland
Fucking disgraceful. I would like to see evidence that the law was unable to pass a stronger sentence, because it was clear attempted murder. Any judge who gives someone a sentence like that for that sort of crime is culpable for further crimes they commit in my eyes, as are the parole board who release them.
To be fair the parole board thought he was armless.
 
May 17, 2013
4,797
713


This was on the show mindhunter and i made a thread at time, but makes more sense to put it here, holy fuck is it chilling. Complete mentalists.

Has this been put up here before ?. Reading it is bad enough, the real tape must be beyond brutal to listen to.
 
Last edited:
Jun 3, 2013
787
580


This was on the show mindhunter and i made a thread at time, but makes more sense to put it here, holy fuck is it chilling. Complete mentalists.

Has this been put up here before ?. Reading it is bad enough, the real tape must be beyond brutal to listen to.
Did they feature that on mindhunter? I can't remember that. Anyway when's the next season coming ?
 
May 17, 2013
4,797
713
Did they feature that on mindhunter? I can't remember that. Anyway when's the next season coming ?
He tells the new guy to go listen to the audio to see if he can take it. This year I believe think I saw August time.

They have new FBI agents in there training listen to the audio as they have that still at there headquarters. All we can ever hear is a few seconds off hee screaming.
 

Mat Cauthon

“Positive Forum Contribution”
May 22, 2013
8,727
5,662
He tells the new guy to go listen to the audio to see if he can take it. This year I believe think I saw August time.

They have new FBI agents in there training listen to the audio as they have that still at there headquarters. All we can ever hear is a few seconds off hee screaming.
The only real footage of the tape can be found on YouTube. It’s a news report with people leaving the court and you can hear the actual footage in the background.