How to neutralize a jab?

Mar 13, 2013
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27
How do you neutralize your opponent's jab? Do you do it by stepping to the left, out of the way of his jab, and then countering with a right cross?
 
Jun 2, 2012
20,885
5,305
Team Fury
It all depends on the jab, slipping to either side then throwing counters will work, or you could parry and counter if you can time him. Or just make him fall short and land a right over the top by either pulling back or half stepping out of range. Those things will soon make him apprehensive to throw it, but you have to be consistent, try and make him pay for every jab he wants to throw to completely take it out of his game
 

JeffJoiner

CHB Writers
Jun 5, 2013
11,153
1,949
Trying To Make A Dollar
I'm a tall guy who loved to work behind a long jab. The guys who were most effective against me would slip my jab over a shoulder, then counter with a crisp shot to the ribs. One guy in my gym could hit the same spot over and over. Eventually, this made me limit my jabs and let shorter fighters in range. It wasn't good.
 

Chacal

Top tier
Jul 26, 2012
21,617
2,164
How do you neutralize your opponent's jab? Do you do it by stepping to the left, out of the way of his jab, and then countering with a right cross?
One I fucking hated when fighting southpaws was them slipping to the right and throwing a right to my body, eventually makes you think twice.
 
Jun 6, 2012
1,935
3,582
A better shot with a southpaw is to lean left and throw the right inside their jab.

Every jab from your opponent is an opportunity.
 
Jun 9, 2013
14
0
I'm a tall guy who loved to work behind a long jab. The guys who were most effective against me would slip my jab over a shoulder, then counter with a crisp shot to the ribs. One guy in my gym could hit the same spot over and over. Eventually, this made me limit my jabs and let shorter fighters in range. It wasn't good.
This is what feints are for.

Feint the jab and when he slips, throw a HARD left. That'll stop them from trying that counter again (make sure to block the body shot with your right arm/elbow though ;-) ). Also make sure you move your head and keep your shoulders up to protect your chin, as when he catches on he'll likely feint his left hook to your body and throw an overhand right.

Hope this helps!
 
Jun 9, 2013
696
180
No one answer.

Feints - Make him not want to throw his jab
Counters - Take advantage of the openings
Feet - Dictate range
Head-movement - Make it hard for him to actually find the target

Obviously a very generic answer; as with most, it's one of those 'it depends' scenarios.
 
Jun 9, 2013
14
0
There's lots of ways to establish a dominant jab. But you don't necessarily want to take his jab away if you're a counter-puncher as this will leave you with less opportunities to counter.

But I digress. To take his jab away you basically want to counter his jab.

Assuming you're fighting orthodox vs orthodox, an easy way to counter is what we call "catch-and-shoot". This means you keep your rear hand open facing your opponent and catch his jab with your rear hand and instantly throw your own jab. If you can time your opponent it might be an option to slip his jab to the outside (your right) and throw your jab at the same time and maybe even follow up with a right hand.

Another relatively easy counter is to duck under his jab and throw a straight right to his belly.
 

Bogotazo

King of the Beige
May 17, 2013
32,549
4,289
New York
I repeat:

-Learn to parry and catch his jab, and come back with your own. This is a basic, all around good skill to have.
-Jab at the same time he does; depending on your reach or whether you can step in with it, it can work to discourage him from throwing it.
-If he doesn't throw his right hand with authority or as a lead, circle in that direction so that he can't time his jab.
-When he flurries, time hard single or double shots in between his out of your guard to start finding holes.
-Learn to step while smoothly moving your upper body; don't twitch and waist energy, but don't stay stagnant.
-Cut the ring off well by closing his exits and hammer him to the body, throwing right hands over his jab as you come in, and that should slow him down.

What are the size and dimensions like for the both of you?

He's a bout 2 maybe 3 inches taller. More of a lean build whereas I'm a little more stocky.

Ths seems like some good advice. I guess I've gotten myself mentally to the point to where I'm too paranoid because I worry too much about defense and don't let my hands go enough.


Ok then. The tips I've suggested still mostly apply. Do you think you can step in while he jabs and close the gap to land your own as he unfurls his? That's a good way to get inside.

If I were you, I'd practice a lot on a slip rope. Do you use one? It's a great tool for building the muscle memory necessary to get under and use your smaller height to your advantage. Move forwards while bobbing and weaving, backwards while slipping, envision yourself throwing counters, etc. This is much more conducive to moving and defending while still staying in position to punch, instead of shelling up ineffectively.

Try drills that make sure you can close the distance and take away his space to work. Side-stepping while maintaining balance, closing off the exits, etc. Try this with a partner who can move a lot, maybe do it without punches or with only jabs.

Can you body punch? Once you're flexible up top and efficient enough with your footwork, hammering this guy to the body after you get past his jab will be key. He'll slow down, become nervous, waste energy trying to get away, while you control the center.

To be successful, as you said, a lot of it is mental. As the stockier fighter who must press, you have to go into that ring thinking you're going to be the boss. It's not easy, but if you can tell yourself that no matter what, you're going to make him pay for every attempted flurry and make him work to keep moving just to keep you out of his face, then you've won half the battle.

Take this fight for example (even just the first 3 rounds). Yuri Foreman is known as a mobile fighter who fights in quick bursts, and Cotto is the stockier man. From the first round, he keeps his right glove up high, and times his own jabs upwards when Yuri starts to unleash his, or steps to the left to slip or parry it, while opening up the angle for his own. He has an easy rhythm going in his legs and upper body, and has to move much less than Yuri does to get some offense going, or to duck under his shots. The more Cotto quickly goes to where Foreman is about to be, the more energy Yuri starts to waste, and the more sloppy his shots get in an attempt to keep him off and make progress on points; all the while, Miguel is chillin. He knows he's the man with the more dangerous offense, and it shows in his body language.

[video=youtube;pwAAJI7oqfg]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwAAJI7oqfg[/video]

Obviously, you're not Miguel Cotto, but you're opponent isn't Yuri Foreman either. Practice these fundamentals, and become more afraid of losing the round than you are of getting hit. Even if he gets the best of you again, you will have improved.
 

JDK

Not a cunt
Jun 3, 2013
2,123
621
SoCal
No one answer.

Feints - Make him not want to throw his jab
Counters - Take advantage of the openings
Feet - Dictate range
Head-movement - Make it hard for him to actually find the target

Obviously a very generic answer; as with most, it's one of those 'it depends' scenarios.
Definitely work with your feet. There are different types of jabs and jabbers. Distance is key to take the jab away.
Shorten or create distance and don't let them settle.