I'm an Expert on Hitler. Ask Me Anything.

Jun 7, 2012
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That’s too much honesty for a lawyer, what do you really do?
He's really a Dutch version of a Special Activities Division agent specializing in black ops whilst posting a love for watches (A fantastic thread ESB he started) and Asian women. Benicio Del Toro was a ¨lawyer¨ in Sicario as well.
 
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@Drunkenboat explain world ice theory to me in 200 words or less
Where did you hear about that?

Anyway, Austrian bloke had a dream that the universe began from an exploding star. This explosion shot all kinds of material out and it turned into ice. So he kind of assumed that the universe is filled with ice. He also believed in Atlantis, the great flood and multiple moons.

The nazis picked up on it as an alternative to jewish science and combined with this belief that the master race came from the icy north.

The bloke who started it famously didnt believe in mathematics. Hitler liked him and I think you see a common trend at the time - the belief that common sense and alternative knowledge was better than the mainstream academic elite.
 

Jack McW

Long Live Israel !!!
Nov 23, 2014
3,072
2,175
Where did you hear about that?

Anyway, Austrian bloke had a dream that the universe began from an exploding star. This explosion shot all kinds of material out and it turned into ice. So he kind of assumed that the universe is filled with ice. He also believed in Atlantis, the great flood and multiple moons.

The nazis picked up on it as an alternative to jewish science and combined with this belief that the master race came from the icy north.

The bloke who started it famously didnt believe in mathematics. Hitler liked him and I think you see a common trend at the time - the belief that common sense and alternative knowledge was better than the mainstream academic elite.
I heard nicky g discuss it at the BNP’s last annual general meeting.

T’was a good craic tbh.
 
May 22, 2013
5,676
4,955
Parts Unknown
This is a long post and I didn’t want to clog up the thread.

WX 6092 Pte A.R. Nigelbro “D” (Don) Company 2/28th Battalion.

I joined the AIF in July 1940, aged 21, trained at Northam, and on April 16th 1941 embarked at Fremantle on the Isle-de-France. On reaching Colombo we waited for 10 days while it was decided where we would go. We eventually went to Palestine and were engaged in desert training for some weeks.
We were 2nd Reinforcements for the 2/28th Battalion which was part of the force defending Tobruk. We went in by destroyer, fast and at night, because they needed to be clear before daylight and out of range of the German dive bombers. There were already many wrecks in the harbour.
For us Tobruk was not a comfortable place. The ground rose from the sea in a series of ridges and flattened out into the desert. There was only scattered vegetation. The town built by the Italians was in ruins although some buildings were being utilised - one as a hospital. An American born fascist called William Joyce, while broadcasting propaganda for the Germans, said the soldiers were just like “Rats” living in holes in the ground. Actually he was right. There was no shelter above ground so we had to go under it. The story was meant to be demoralising but it bacame a joke. The name stuck and everyone who served in Tobruk was “Rat”.
The Italians had built 150 concrete bunkers in a semicircle around the town and inside that again a number of gun emplacements. This became known as the perimeter or the Red Line. Inside that again defences were dug which became the Blue Line, and nearer to the coast the Yellow Line. Our task was to hold the Germans outside the perimeter and deny them use of the Port for as long as it took our army in Egypt to build up enough strength to push the enemy out of Africa. All patrols and engagements with the enemy took place at night and you kept your head down during the day. Life was just bearable. It was very hot during the day and very cold at night.
The dugouts were full of flies and fleas and sand. The fine sand continually drifting, covered everything including the food. The water was rationed and you only washed when you took a spell on the Yellow Line and could get down to the sea.
During an attack on August 3rd I collected some shrapnel in my leg which meant a trip to the Aid Post and, with others, out by destroyer to hospital in Alexandria. The Battalion in Tobruk was relieved in September and I rejoined them in Palestine then went up to Syria for more desert training.
By July 1942 Tobruk had fallen and Rommel was within 70 miles of Egypt. On July 26th we were part of the spearhead to attack a feature called Ruin Ridge, where the Germans had consolidated. It was to be a night attack and we went in at midnight and by early morning we had secured our objective. Then things began to go wrong. By daylight we were surrounded by enemy tanks and neither reinforcements nor supplies were able to get through. We had no option but to surrender - a most unpleasant feeling. 543 men became prisoners of war. We were trucked to Benghazi in Libya and handed over to the Italians, who loaded us and other prisoners on to two ships, the Nino Bixio and the Sestriere for transport to Italy.
The ships unfortunately were not marked with a Red Cross and during the crossing a British submarine fires 3 torpedoes at the Nino Bixio. They struck the engine room and number 1 Hold containing British, New Zealand and Australian prisoners. The ship did not sink and was towed ashore, but of the 504 thought to be in the Hold 284 were killed, drowned, died of injury or were missing. 29 of them were 2/28th men. Those of us who were in the Hold of the Sestriere were unaware of the tragedy until the survivors began to join us. We had travelled by train (in Cattle trucks) to a camp in Udine in N.E. Italy. Conditions were poor and we relied on Red Cross parcels to survive.
When Italy capitulated in 1943 the Germans took over and we were “trucked” again to Kaffenberg in Austria. When the Americans were advancing the Germans marched us 250 kilometres to Markt-Pongau. The only food we had was our meagre ration from the camp and what we could scrounge along the way. Markt-Pongau was our last camp and in July 1945 we were liberated by the Americans, flown to Rheims in France then Eastbourne camp in England where we were outfitted for the trip home. We came home by sea, through the Panama to New Zealand, on to Sydney and yet again across the Nullarbor to Perth in “Cattle Trucks” 3000km.
Being a prisoner of war was an experience and not always a pleasant one. We were always hungry and found winter very cold as our clothing was limited. We slept in 2 or 3 tiered bunks and those who removed clothes at night were fully dressed by the morning. We were, however spared the trauma of further active service as the reformed 2/28th went on to fight in the Pacific.
 
Last edited:

Wordup

Stranges creatures, women.
May 16, 2013
5,502
2,175
Rotherham, South Yorkshire
Not exactly true.. iT was goring who wanted his Luftwaffe to finish them of so he convincd hitler to halt the panzers.. only the weather wasn’t right for the Luftwaffe also lots of bombs fell on the beach and didn’t explode.
Major fuck up.. 300thousand plus Brits escapes..
The germans could have captured them
Don’t forget the French stood and fought in order to give the British time to escape.
 
This is a long post and I didn’t want to clog up the thread.

WX 6092 Pte A.R. Nigelbro “D” (Don) Company 2/28th Battalion.

I joined the AIF in July 1940, aged 21, trained at Northam, and on April 16th 1941 embarked at Fremantle on the Isle-de-France. On reaching Colombo we waited for 10 days while it was decided where we would go. We eventually went to Palestine and were engaged in desert training for some weeks.
We were 2nd Reinforcements for the 2/28th Battalion which was part of the force defending Tobruk. We went in by destroyer, fast and at night, because they needed to be clear before daylight and out of range of the German dive bombers. There were already many wrecks in the harbour.
For us Tobruk was not a comfortable place. The ground rose from the sea in a series of ridges and flattened out into the desert. There was only scattered vegetation. The town built by the Italians was in ruins although some buildings were being utilised - one as a hospital. An American born fascist called William Joyce, while broadcasting propaganda for the Germans, said the soldiers were just like “Rats” living in holes in the ground. Actually he was right. There was no shelter above ground so we had to go under it. The story was meant to be demoralising but it bacame a joke. The name stuck and everyone who served in Tobruk was “Rat”.
The Italians had built 150 concrete bunkers in a semicircle around the town and inside that again a number of gun emplacements. This became known as the perimeter or the Red Line. Inside that again defences were dug which became the Blue Line, and nearer to the coast the Yellow Line. Our task was to hold the Germans outside the perimeter and deny them use of the Port for as long as it took our army in Egypt to build up enough strength to push the enemy out of Africa. All patrols and engagements with the enemy took place at night and you kept your head down during the day. Life was just bearable. It was very hot during the day and very cold at night.
The dugouts were full of flies and fleas and sand. The fine sand continually drifting, covered everything including the food. The water was rationed and you only washed when you took a spell on the Yellow Line and could get down to the sea.
During an attack on August 3rd I collected some shrapnel in my leg which meant a trip to the Aid Post and, with others, out by destroyer to hospital in Alexandria. The Battalion in Tobruk was relieved in September and I rejoined them in Palestine then went up to Syria for more desert training.
By July 1942 Tobruk had fallen and Rommel was within 70 miles of Egypt. On July 26th we were part of the spearhead to attack a feature called Ruin Ridge, where the Germans had consolidated. It was to be a night attack and we went in at midnight and by early morning we had secured our objective. Then things began to go wrong. By daylight we were surrounded by enemy tanks and neither reinforcements nor supplies were able to get through. We had no option but to surrender - a most unpleasant feeling. 543 men became prisoners of war. We were trucked to Benghazi in Libya and handed over to the Italians, who loaded us and other prisoners on to two ships, the Nino Bixio and the Sestriere for transport to Italy.
The ships unfortunately were not marked with a Red Cross and during the crossing a British submarine fires 3 torpedoes at the Nino Bixio. They struck the engine room and number 1 Hold containing British, New Zealand and Australian prisoners. The ship did not sink and was towed ashore, but of the 504 thought to be in the Hold 284 were killed, drowned, died of injury or were missing. 29 of them were 2/28th men. Those of us who were in the Hold of the Sestriere were unaware of the tragedy until the survivors began to join us. We had travelled by train (in Cattle trucks) to a camp in Udine in N.E. Italy. Conditions were poor and we relied on Red Cross parcels to survive.
When Italy capitulated in 1943 the Germans took over and we were “trucked” again to Kaffenberg in Austria. When the Americans were advancing the Germans marched us 250 kilometres to Markt-Pongau. The only food we had was our meagre ration from the camp and what we could scrounge along the way. Markt-Pongau was our last camp and in July 1945 we were liberated by the Americans, flown to Rheims in France then Eastbourne camp in England where we were outfitted for the trip home. We came home by sea, through the Panama to New Zealand, on to Sydney and yet again across the Nullarbor to Perth in “Cattle Trucks” 3000km.
Being a prisoner of war was an experience and not always a pleasant one. We were always hungry and found winter very cold as our clothing was limited. We slept in 2 or 3 tiered bunks and those who removed clothes at night were fully dressed by the morning. We were, however spared the trauma of further active service as the reformed 2/28th went on to fight in the Pacific.
Very interesting. Perhaps he means Kapfenberg? Thats a town in Austria. There was a displaced persons camp there in 1945 - I wouldnt be surprised if they just converted the old camp into one for refugees.

Here it is:
7206

Oh and your grandpa is making it sound a bit easier than it really was. That 250 km march he did to the final camp was basically up a mountain. Its over in the alps near Salzburg.

Here it is:
7207
 
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May 22, 2013
5,676
4,955
Parts Unknown
Very interesting. Perhaps he means Kapfenberg? Thats a town in Austria. There was a displaced persons camp there in 1945 - I wouldnt be surprised if they just converted the old camp into one for refugees.

Here it is:
View attachment 7206

Oh and your grandpa is making it sound a bit easier than it really was. That 250 km march he did to the final camp was basically up a mountain. Its over in the alps near Salzburg.

Here it is:
View attachment 7207
That transcript was taken from a book, I probably should quote the author Patricia Arundle. I was careful to recreate the grammar and spelling and that’s how it was spelled.
Those photos are cool are they your or from the internet? My Grandfather left me his scrapbooks and personal effects and somewhere there are postcards from Palestine and Alexandria, absolutely beautiful modern cities before they were wrecked.
 
That transcript was taken from a book, I probably should quote the author Patricia Arundle. I was careful to recreate the grammar and spelling and that’s how it was spelled.
Those photos are cool are they your or from the internet? My Grandfather left me his scrapbooks and personal effects and somewhere there are postcards from Palestine and Alexandria, absolutely beautiful modern cities before they were wrecked.
Thats just googling. Those are beautiful places in Austria today
 
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