Insane SJW examples of bullshit "microaggressions"

kf3

Jul 17, 2012
4,686
2,361
South London
No, the issue seems to be that the media can't put the horse before the cart and understand the symbol has a looooong history as the OK sign ... because the Christchurch shooter drenched his entire terrorist act in internet culture, it doesn't mean the symbol suddenly became what 4Chan presented it as for a prank... people use it all over the world, if you just suddenly accept it as a hate symbol, you end up with people being fired for jobs because they simply didn't keep up with this news story.

The far right know exactly what they're doing with this, note the line in the article "a growing list of hate symbols", they'll come up with something new every month so idiots can use it, milk, clowns, the hashtag, OK hand sign, snow ... where do you stop and say "you know what, I think they might be just be taking the piss out us now?"
maybe i just don't understand the white power perspective in this. they adopt the prank sign and use it enough that it does mean white power now, so other white people inevitably get caught out using the ok sign so lose jobs so the white power people are happy that they fucked over white people?

i'll stick with the opinion that media, left/right and trolls are all complete fucking clowns.
 

rjjfan

The Greatest
May 17, 2013
10,853
3,980
Fuck off you cunt, I'm Asian and it's far more convenient for me if I can find my tonkatsu sauce or oyster sauce in the Asia food section than if it's mixed up with all the other sauces.

Food & Drink
Ethnic food aisles in supermarkets: racist, as celebrity chef David Chang says, or simply convenient?
  • Italian foods such as olive oil and vinegar are integrated in regular aisles, but foods of other ethnicities such as Chinese and Japanese have own sections
  • Does this stigmatise ethnic minority shoppers? Experts say not – these aisles help white shoppers who want to try international cuisines find what they need
Topic | Food and Drinks
The Washington Post

The Washington Post

Published: 3:00pm, 3 Oct, 2019



To millions of shoppers, the supermarket is just a place to stock up on produce and pantry staples to keep the family fed.
But to others, especially children of immigrants who may already feel pushed to the margins of society, the supermarket can be just another place to experience the sting of their outsider status.
The sting occurs whenever they walk down the “ethnic” food aisle, the section of the supermarket that, to some in America, plays out like a remnant of the Jim Crow era, when laws established separate facilities for African-Americans in the post-Reconstruction South.
Sometimes known as the “international” food aisle, or even “Asian” and “Latino” aisles, these rows can come across to the shoppers they seemingly target as de facto segregation, another kind of “separate but equal” policy that marginalised African-Americans for generations.


A shelf filled with Asian food products in a supermarket. Photo: Shutterstock

A shelf filled with Asian food products in a supermarket. Photo: Shutterstock
Share:
“If you go to the ethnic food aisle, that is sort of the last bastion of racism that you can see in full daylight in retail America,” David Chang, the man at the helm of the Momofuku dining empire, said on his podcast this summer. “It is something that’s got to go.”

In a telephone interview, Chang says there is an “invisible ceiling” on some supermarket items: Italian products that were once marginalised, such as olive oils and vinegars, are now routinely integrated into grocery store aisles, while Chinese, Japanese and Latino foods remain stuck in their own sections. The ongoing segregation of these foods, Chang says, isn’t about acceptance among the mainstream.
 
Jul 24, 2012
8,365
8,137
Fuck off you cunt, I'm Asian and it's far more convenient for me if I can find my tonkatsu sauce or oyster sauce in the Asia food section than if it's mixed up with all the other sauces.

Food & Drink
Ethnic food aisles in supermarkets: racist, as celebrity chef David Chang says, or simply convenient?
  • Italian foods such as olive oil and vinegar are integrated in regular aisles, but foods of other ethnicities such as Chinese and Japanese have own sections
  • Does this stigmatise ethnic minority shoppers? Experts say not – these aisles help white shoppers who want to try international cuisines find what they need
Topic | Food and Drinks
The Washington Post
The Washington Post

Published: 3:00pm, 3 Oct, 2019



To millions of shoppers, the supermarket is just a place to stock up on produce and pantry staples to keep the family fed.
But to others, especially children of immigrants who may already feel pushed to the margins of society, the supermarket can be just another place to experience the sting of their outsider status.
The sting occurs whenever they walk down the “ethnic” food aisle, the section of the supermarket that, to some in America, plays out like a remnant of the Jim Crow era, when laws established separate facilities for African-Americans in the post-Reconstruction South.
Sometimes known as the “international” food aisle, or even “Asian” and “Latino” aisles, these rows can come across to the shoppers they seemingly target as de facto segregation, another kind of “separate but equal” policy that marginalised African-Americans for generations.


A shelf filled with Asian food products in a supermarket. Photo: Shutterstock

A shelf filled with Asian food products in a supermarket. Photo: Shutterstock
Share:
“If you go to the ethnic food aisle, that is sort of the last bastion of racism that you can see in full daylight in retail America,” David Chang, the man at the helm of the Momofuku dining empire, said on his podcast this summer. “It is something that’s got to go.”

In a telephone interview, Chang says there is an “invisible ceiling” on some supermarket items: Italian products that were once marginalised, such as olive oils and vinegars, are now routinely integrated into grocery store aisles, while Chinese, Japanese and Latino foods remain stuck in their own sections. The ongoing segregation of these foods, Chang says, isn’t about acceptance among the mainstream.
Those racist whites and their...

<spins wheel>
providing selections of ethnic food items in easy to access areas... :mad4
 

Deebo

"Messkin" Deebo
Jun 5, 2013
14,907
10,877
Show dem balls bro
Those racist whites and their...

<spins wheel>
providing selections of ethnic food items in easy to access areas... :mad4
Who wouldn't want to weed through all the different brands and flavors of Mexican, tabasco and Louisiana hot sauces to find that one bottle of Huy Fong chili garlic sauce they need? It's the extra time consumption and frustration that make it a memorable experience.
 
Reactions: Haggis

Deebo

"Messkin" Deebo
Jun 5, 2013
14,907
10,877
Show dem balls bro
On a side note, they already do mix up the hot sauces here in Northern Cali in lots of stores. Hence the 5 minutes of meticulously looking through the hot sauce section to find the one specific Asian hot sauce I needed in the sea of Mexican and Tex-Mex hot sauces I went though myself.

What really throws me off is that they're now putting all the vegan food such as veggie "Chic'n Patties" and what not in the same section as the regular chicken patties. Doesn't this piss off the vegans?
 
Jul 24, 2012
8,365
8,137
Who wouldn't want to weed through all the different brands and flavors of Mexican, tabasco and Louisiana hot sauces to find that one bottle of Huy Fong chili garlic sauce they need? It's the extra time consumption and frustration that make it a memorable experience.
i guess the surprise of actual finding things might be fun, “oh hey, I can finally make that Korean recipe I saw on YouTube, who would have known they would have that obscure sauce I needed for it in amongst the ketchup s?”

Since when did Olive Oil become some niche ethnic Italian thing, isn’t that stuff used as a common ingredient by like half the worlds population?

In our super markets, we have a separate section for both American and Mexican foods, how oppressed are you in our country mate?
 

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
34,722
11,914
Well over here, the Dutch food is in the "UK" section of the international aisle. Drops and Kanos mixed in with Yorkie bars, ffs. :fire

:hat
 
Jun 4, 2012
27,812
18,360
Fuck off you cunt, I'm Asian and it's far more convenient for me if I can find my tonkatsu sauce or oyster sauce in the Asia food section than if it's mixed up with all the other sauces.
Chang comes across as a complete bellend whenever I see him on TV. Great chef, hugely successful, but massive chip on his shoulder and obsessed with his Korean identity and obnoxious to many of the people he meets and talks to. He's the sort of person to write a piece like this and yet would be complaining about white people appropriating his culture if Kimchi was just sold alongside mayonnaise and ketchup.

He talks down to people he interviews on his Netflix show and is a contrary, arrogant muppet.
 
Reactions: rjjfan
Jul 24, 2012
8,365
8,137
This is an older one but I missed it the first time around...

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/sep/27/do-you-boast-about-your-fitness-watch-out-youll-unavoidably-become-rightwing

7445


"If there is one thing that irks me more than the awareness-raising month – Go Sober for October, grow a moustache to celebrate your prostate through November, etc – it’s the signal-boosting day. Yesterday was Fitness Day. Sorry, let me give that its proper title: #FitnessDay. The space bar is always the first casualty of a manufactured social media movement.

The tweeting began before 6am, as healthy, responsible people announced to the world that they were going to the gym for their 6am workout, and might go for a run later. Public Health England published a timeless graphic, describing everything that counts as “moderate physical exercise”, including “active recreation”, also known as “moderate physical exercise”. By 7am, someone had posted a picture of themselves doing a complicated yoga posture on a log, and I was as angry as a bull. The problem wasn’t the hashtagging; the problem is with fitness itself. "


That's right, Movember, a charity set up to raise money for prostate cancer, the most common cancer in men and the 2nd biggest killer of men with cancer is actually just a month to celebrate our prostates.

That's how big of a prick this woman is... having watched my uncle die slowly and painfully from prostate cancer (along with bowel and colorectal) over many years and having a brother that's raised thousands of £££ thru Movember for about a decade, can I just say a big "Fuck You" to scumbag Zoe here.

7446

Why is it that the Guardian can platform opinions like these and NEVER get pulled up for it but if an outlet like Quillette publishes an article with a specialist bestowing the virtues of clean nuclear energy, halfwits like Bashafag will compile lists of these as evidence for how terrible they are?

It might be the opinion section but the Guardian gets away with fucking murder with the things they allow posted on there.