Insane SJW examples of bullshit "microaggressions"

Jul 24, 2012
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This reminds me of the M.I.A. track from her album Kala, "Come Around feat. Timbaland" in which Timbaland raps the immortal line.

"Baby girl
You and me, need to go to your teepee
The moon is full, and I'm shining. "

M.I.A. is Sri Lankan ... Timbaland probably heard she is Indian from someone, I'm guessing.
 
Apr 7, 2014
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This reminds me of the M.I.A. track from her album Kala, "Come Around feat. Timbaland" in which Timbaland raps the immortal line.

"Baby girl
You and me, need to go to your teepee
The moon is full, and I'm shining. "

M.I.A. is Sri Lankan ... Timbaland probably heard she is Indian from someone, I'm guessing.
Or maybe he thought it was catchy and you're a little dull for thinking a respected and well travelled music producer would mistake a brown woman from England, with an English accent, for a Native American.
 
Jul 24, 2012
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Or maybe he thought it was catchy and you're a little dull for thinking a respected and well travelled music producer would mistake a brown woman from England, with an English accent, for a Native American.
Maybe he was just making a joke mate?

Could be that too but you probably wouldn't have considered that one since you're such a humourless, boring, snidey autist.
 
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Apr 7, 2014
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Maybe he was just making a joke mate?

Could be that too but you probably wouldn't have considered that one since you're such a humourless, boring, snidey autist.
You're racist for thinking Sri Lankans with English accents have anything to do with Native Americans and that a black man would mix them up.
 
Apr 7, 2014
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I have not really heard about it. I've heard of racism though. Guess it is like what gingers go through.
It’s part of the caste system in India and whatever the equivalent is in China, so it’s a really old idea. Black women were being sold skin bleaching creams and hair straightening products in the US for many decades if not over a century.
 
May 25, 2013
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It’s part of the caste system in India and whatever the equivalent is in China, so it’s a really old idea. Black women were being sold skin bleaching creams and hair straightening products in the US for many decades if not over a century.
Still happens in Indonesia (and I'm sure other places). You can by skin lightening cream on almost every supermarket.
 
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Jun 4, 2012
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It’s part of the caste system in India and whatever the equivalent is in China, so it’s a really old idea. Black women were being sold skin bleaching creams and hair straightening products in the US for many decades if not over a century.
The caste system is not done by colour. But for sure it's long standing. That said so is the reverse. Having a tan is far more admired in white people of the west than being pale, and this only sprung up in the past 60 years or so.
 
Apr 7, 2014
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The caste system is not done by colour. But for sure it's long standing. That said so is the reverse. Having a tan is far more admired in white people of the west than being pale, and this only sprung up in the past 60 years or so.
White people tanning isn't based in socioeconomic difference. Not the same.
 
Jun 4, 2012
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White people tanning isn't based in socioeconomic difference. Not the same.
Isn't it? There is a case for it being linked to the ability to go on vacation. Being tanned meant being able to leave low sunshine parts of Europe and lay out in the sun.

The working class in the UK are far more likely to use fake tan than wealthy white people.

I'm not convinced by this argument, but there's absolutely no definitive explanation for the phenomenon.

Being pale in Asia is fuck all to do with idolising caucasians, and entirely about the link to wealth in which being darker meant you worked outdoors and being rich meant you were indoors.
 

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
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Isn't it? There is a case for it being linked to the ability to go on vacation. Being tanned meant being able to leave low sunshine parts of Europe and lay out in the sun.

The working class in the UK are far more likely to use fake tan than wealthy white people.

I'm not convinced by this argument, but there's absolutely no definitive explanation for the phenomenon.

Being pale in Asia is fuck all to do with idolising caucasians, and entirely about the link to wealth in which being darker meant you worked outdoors and being rich meant you were indoors.
I would say a fair amount of it might trace back to the days of aristocrats being indoors and peasants being outdoors. Working class people here regularly take the piss out of my ghostly white skin and tell me I must have never worked a day in my life. :conf

:hat
 
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Apr 7, 2014
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Isn't it? There is a case for it being linked to the ability to go on vacation. Being tanned meant being able to leave low sunshine parts of Europe and lay out in the sun.

The working class in the UK are far more likely to use fake tan than wealthy white people.

I'm not convinced by this argument, but there's absolutely no definitive explanation for the phenomenon.

Being pale in Asia is fuck all to do with idolising caucasians, and entirely about the link to wealth in which being darker meant you worked outdoors and being rich meant you were indoors.
Come on, you're better than that. There is no serious comparison to skin lightening.

And where did I even use the word Caucasian? I haven't even said anyone was trying to look Caucasian.
 
Jun 4, 2012
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Come on, you're better than that. There is no serious comparison to skin lightening.

And where did I even use the word Caucasian? I haven't even said anyone was trying to look Caucasian.
The comparison is valid and interesting. It does not make it accurate. If dark skin in Asia and Africa was attached to concepts of poverty and rural, manual labour and that led to a bias of lighter skin being deemed more beautiful, than it is absolutely interesting to look at the explosion of white people viewing darker skin tones as more appealing, especially when there is a link to tanning and wealth.

As I said, I don't think it is proven, but it is easy to see how dark skin has been deemed ugly in racist, white dominated societies. It is less obvious why lighter skin has been deemed preferable in nations like Thailand and Vietnam. You didn't mention Caucasians, but that is the predominant explanation for why Asians lighten their skin. It is false, and by being false it therefore demands that the answer is given as to why the same light skin preference exists. Nobody knows for sure, but the link to outdoor and indoor labour makes absolute sense.

It then does demand that there MIGHT (and as I say it is tenuous, but worth looking at) be a link to the explosion of white people tanning with holidays in hot places being something that the wealthy can afford.

Skin lightening is definitely more damaging, pervasive and intrusive, but the origins of it are unclear, and things like the Hindu caste system have nothing to do with it. All this really shows is that humans find multiple ways to be tribal and obnoxious.
 
May 22, 2013
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Fuck off you cunt, I'm Asian and it's far more convenient for me if I can find my tonkatsu sauce or oyster sauce in the Asia food section than if it's mixed up with all the other sauces.

Food & Drink
Ethnic food aisles in supermarkets: racist, as celebrity chef David Chang says, or simply convenient?
  • Italian foods such as olive oil and vinegar are integrated in regular aisles, but foods of other ethnicities such as Chinese and Japanese have own sections
  • Does this stigmatise ethnic minority shoppers? Experts say not – these aisles help white shoppers who want to try international cuisines find what they need
Topic | Food and Drinks
The Washington Post
The Washington Post

Published: 3:00pm, 3 Oct, 2019



To millions of shoppers, the supermarket is just a place to stock up on produce and pantry staples to keep the family fed.
But to others, especially children of immigrants who may already feel pushed to the margins of society, the supermarket can be just another place to experience the sting of their outsider status.
The sting occurs whenever they walk down the “ethnic” food aisle, the section of the supermarket that, to some in America, plays out like a remnant of the Jim Crow era, when laws established separate facilities for African-Americans in the post-Reconstruction South.
Sometimes known as the “international” food aisle, or even “Asian” and “Latino” aisles, these rows can come across to the shoppers they seemingly target as de facto segregation, another kind of “separate but equal” policy that marginalised African-Americans for generations.


A shelf filled with Asian food products in a supermarket. Photo: Shutterstock

A shelf filled with Asian food products in a supermarket. Photo: Shutterstock
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“If you go to the ethnic food aisle, that is sort of the last bastion of racism that you can see in full daylight in retail America,” David Chang, the man at the helm of the Momofuku dining empire, said on his podcast this summer. “It is something that’s got to go.”

In a telephone interview, Chang says there is an “invisible ceiling” on some supermarket items: Italian products that were once marginalised, such as olive oils and vinegars, are now routinely integrated into grocery store aisles, while Chinese, Japanese and Latino foods remain stuck in their own sections. The ongoing segregation of these foods, Chang says, isn’t about acceptance among the mainstream.
Put it in the cat food aisle. That’s what most of it tastes like.
 
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