Joshua/Ruiz Rematch

May 17, 2013
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Set for December 7 this year in Riyadh.

NEVER MIND: I see it's been posted and commented on many times on the British board. Should have known that....DUH
 
Jun 4, 2013
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Set for December 7 this year in Riyadh.

NEVER MIND: I see it's been posted and commented on many times on the British board. Should have known that....DUH
No, it's fine. I think there are some posters that don't even go to the British forum. I know I only peak there on occasion.

Anyways, surprised it's headed for the Middle East. I thought it'd be here in America. I guess they compromised.
 
Reactions: gumbo2176
May 17, 2013
9,851
7,751
Louisiana
No, it's fine. I think there are some posters that don't even go to the British forum. I know I only peak there on occasion.

Anyways, surprised it's headed for the Middle East. I thought it'd be here in America. I guess they compromised.
I went there as an afterthought and saw it was 25 pages deep with comments and they announced the fight back in early June with today being the first I've heard of it when someone in a darts site I post to asked what I though.

I've got to get out more...……………………….
 
Reactions: Mexi-Box
Aug 28, 2014
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Anyone thinking Ruiz coming lighter is a negative more than a positive? The guy is actually solid at the heavy weight he came in, in the Parker fight he started way too fast but slowed down big time but in the AJ fight he paced himself well, if he comes in lighter he might not take AJ's punches as well but I still think he can rock AJ
 
Reactions: Dealt_with

DB Cooper

peel me a grape
May 17, 2013
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Anyone thinking Ruiz coming lighter is a negative more than a positive? The guy is actually solid at the heavy weight he came in, in the Parker fight he started way too fast but slowed down big time but in the AJ fight he paced himself well, if he comes in lighter he might not take AJ's punches as well but I still think he can rock AJ
Interesting question. He wouldn't want to be changing a winning formula too much.
 
Reactions: A.C.S
Jun 6, 2013
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Anyone thinking Ruiz coming lighter is a negative more than a positive? The guy is actually solid at the heavy weight he came in, in the Parker fight he started way too fast but slowed down big time but in the AJ fight he paced himself well, if he comes in lighter he might not take AJ's punches as well but I still think he can rock AJ

How does being overweight help you to take punches?

The only possible negative might be (maybe) having slightly less body weight behind his punches. That could mean a tiny bit less energy being transferred into the opponent.

- But that would likely be a fairly minor change, esp if Andy's foot placement is correct.
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Being (comfortably) lighter of course means he'll be able to keep up a higher output throughout the fight.
AJ is a fairly mechanical fighter, he doesn't seem to be good at thinking and adjusting, so if Andy can keep up a higher output, it will help keep AJ in his box. That makes AJ very predictable.
 
Aug 28, 2014
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How does being overweight help you to take punches?
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The only possible negative might be (maybe) having slightly less body weight behind his punches. That could mean a tiny bit less energy being transferred into the opponent.

- But that would likely be a fairly minor change, esp if Andy's foot placement is correct.
----------

Being (comfortably) lighter of course means he'll be able to keep up a higher output throughout the fight.
AJ is a fairly mechanical fighter, he doesn't seem to be good at thinking and adjusting, so if Andy can keep up a higher output, it will help keep AJ in his box. That makes AJ very predictable.
Weight is one of the key reasons to people taking punches well no? Ruiz weighed 21lbs heavier than AJ means he might have taken the punch better than if he weighed even lighter, on paper Ruiz is overweight but he holds it really well technically AJ is overweight too but its muscle not fat, but the fat seems to work well with Ruiz
 
Jun 6, 2013
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Weight is one of the key reasons to people taking punches well no?

Not in the HW division.

I think you're thinking about a non-HW getting overly dehydrated to make a weight he shouldn't really be fighting at. As you of course know, that can cause a fighter to have not enough fluid in his cranial sack, which then makes him more susceptible to a concussion.

But Andy simply training, and comfortably shedding fat, is something completely different.
 
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Jul 6, 2019
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A larger mass increases punch resistance.
This is to do with the relationship between force, mass, and acceleration.

If you strike two objects of different mass with the same force then the lighter object will accelerate quicker. (think of the difference between kicking a football and a bowling ball).

In boxing terms this would mean the opponent's head will accelerate quicker resulting in more trauma.

There are other factors, but generally more weight equals better resistance.
 
Jun 6, 2013
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A larger mass increases punch resistance.
This is to do with the relationship between force, mass, and acceleration.

If you strike two objects of different mass with the same force then the lighter object will accelerate quicker. (think of the difference between kicking a football and a bowling ball).

In boxing terms this would mean the opponent's head will accelerate quicker resulting in more trauma.

There are other factors, but generally more weight equals better resistance.

Overlooking the physiological mistake you made, are you saying that Andy's HEAD now weighs less than last year?

C'mon ....
 
Jul 6, 2019
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Overlooking the physiological mistake you made, are you saying that Andy's HEAD now weighs less than last year?

C'mon ....
Ha. No, not literally. I was making more of a general point.

Larger mass will reduce the impact of a force acting upon it. (all other things being equal).

You punch a heavyweight, and punch a minimumweight with the same force and it will impact the smaller guy more. It's easier to move a pebble than it is a stone than it is a boulder etc.

Physiological mistake? Can you let me know what that is please? I have been drinking a fair bit and I must be slow on the uptake. Cheers.
 
Reactions: craigseventy
Jun 6, 2013
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You do have a point to some extent, but a fighter's head is not his body. It's connected by a flexible neck, and good fighters learn how to stay loose, so as to minimize the impact of a hit. So a change in body weight has little effect.

Also, FWIW, imagine a train hitting a light car head on, and then the same train hitting a large truck. Which receives more damage, the truck or the car? The truck, of course. The car bounces away, minimizing energy transfer.

The physiological mistake concerns how concussions actually happen. Too complicated to outline here, but easy to research. It usually a SECOND impact, caused by reversing the head's direction. (That's why hooks are so effective.)

Anyway, it's a pretty interesting discussion. I have to think more on it, to be truthful.
FWIW, I have a masters in Kinesiology, and my main focus (many years ago) was on bicycling & boxing.
 
Reactions: Bob Weaver
Jul 6, 2019
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Ha. If you have a Masters in a related field then you should be a lot more knowledgeable on the subject than I am!

My comment was based on high school physics and my own general interest reading.

I know the concussion stuff, I just didn't bother mentioning it because I thought it was self evident. I am often not as clear as I would like on here because I am unsuccessfully trying to multi-task, so cheers for clarifying.

It's a generally held opinion in boxing that gaining weight increases punch resistance. Lots of anecdotal evidence of this, and the inverse, being true. For example, a lot of people attribute Chisora's ko by Whyte to his weight loss.

There are so many factors at play however that it is difficult to establish a direct link without proper study. (Eg you move up in weight and your fighting slower guys so you read the punches better, or your less dehydrated and your brain has a better cushion).

I honestly think the weight Ruiz gains or loses will be more relevant to his punch resistance based on his conditioning, neck strength, and how it impacts his ability to see and react to the shots, rather than because of Newton's laws of motion.

However, all things being equal. a force will still affect a smaller mass more. You are completely correct however that you need to consider the direction and transfer of that force, and what impact it has on the movement of the head.
 
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Jul 6, 2019
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Probably worth me saying that I don't necessarily agree Chisora's weight loss was why he was knocked out.

Whyte has developed a very good left hook, it was late in the fight, and Chisora got caught mid punch. He is also old, with a ton of miles on the clock.

There is nothing to say he wouldn't have been knocked out no matter his weight.