Jump Rope - can help your footwork. Myth or there is some truth in it ?

Jun 7, 2012
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#1
Heard that here and there, some people beleive that the rope can help your footwork....well, maybe it helps the coordination of your legs, but how do you feel about helping your footwork ? Is it a myth, personally I believe it is......
 
May 17, 2013
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Louisiana
#2
There's jumping rope, and there's jumping rope. Meaning if you just stand in one place and hop up and down while the rope passes between the floor and your feet, you won't likely get much out of it but aerobic exercise. However, I've seen pros that practically dance while jumping rope using large areas of the ring or gym while changing direction, pace and intensity of this particular exercise. That requires a lot of dexterity in their footwork to accomplish this, along with a good deal of stamina to maintain it.

I once watched Roberto Duran work out prior to the "No Mas" fight in the Dome in New Orleans and he was a master of the jump rope. Near the end of his session on the rope he'd crouch down like doing a duck walk and choke up on the rope and jump like that for a half minute or so to end his rope routine.
 
Jun 4, 2013
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#3
Teaches you to be light on your feet, don't really see how it can have much crossover to be honest. Why not skip to improve endurance and use that endurance to shadowbox and practice your footwork?
 

thehook13

‪#‎Pray4Khan‬
May 16, 2013
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#5
When it's done properly the rope is a staple in developing the fitness required to move around lightly on your feet. Hopefully learning some agility and coordination at the same time. It's expected you go at a fast pace with bouts of lifting your knees.

Theres skipping as a warm-up also, which is only used to get the blood pumping and warming up similar leg and shoulder muscles used in a boxing workout.
 
Oct 21, 2014
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#10
There's jumping rope, and there's jumping rope. Meaning if you just stand in one place and hop up and down while the rope passes between the floor and your feet, you won't likely get much out of it but aerobic exercise. However, I've seen pros that practically dance while jumping rope using large areas of the ring or gym while changing direction, pace and intensity of this particular exercise. That requires a lot of dexterity in their footwork to accomplish this, along with a good deal of stamina to maintain it.
i am quite agree with his point of view.. Simple rope jumping may b have some impact on footwork but if you do jumping rope by continuously changing position and style than it would definitely effective for your footwork
 
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Misfit

Punch Drunk
Jan 11, 2016
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The Gym
#14
Theres skipping as a warm-up also, which is only used to get the blood pumping and warming up similar leg and shoulder muscles used in a boxing workout.


My boxing club warms us up jumping rope. We do 10 minutes before we do anything else and you have to do 10 pushups (press ups) for each time you screw up at the end of the 10 minutes.
 
Likes: thehook13
Jun 2, 2012
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#15
It's like anything it's how you apply yourself if you do the same patterns and don't stimulate the muscles with different foot patterns and tempos you won't get anywhere.

If you mix up the speed, foot patterns and height of jumps you will feel benefits.

To improve your Boxing footwork you still need to work on additional exercises imo such as balance and breaking down patterns and then using those movement patterns in shadowboxing and working the bag etc.

My footwork massively improved through breaking down techniques and drilling them along with the skipping and agility exercises then working on footwork solely for rounds at a time during shadow.

My skipping i like to do crossovers, over unders, high knees, double crossovers, criss cross feet and moving back and forward laterally. Basically playing with ideas and making it fun.
 
Likes: Presuming Ed
Oct 17, 2017
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#16
If you apply it properly and learn different patterns/moves etc and mix them up freestyle while you skip, then you will not only be exercising your body, but also your brain. The rhythm and mental side of challenges cognitive function way more than simple running, biking or other cardio. I'm biased as i absolutely love skipping, but to me there's no better full body workout in the gym. Years ago i bought a buddy lee skipping DVD, and haven't look back since. If you're just doing clumsy or bog standard skips maybe it's different, but challenge yourself and you'll feel the benefit.
 
Jun 9, 2018
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#17
If a person is asking "will skipping do the work for me" the answer is don't be crazy
If a person is asking "can I improve my skills by adding skipping" the answer is, at a base level it will help with conditioning, but is up to you to do it in a way that improves not only your coordination, but your timing and sense of movement

I do most of my leg training in the pool, it helps me get new techniques down
But then I do skipping to heighten my heart rate during workouts, adds a bit of challenge
I try to up the complexity to heighten my coordination
 
Likes: thehook13

Duo

Bosomus Maximus
Jun 14, 2012
6,174
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#18
No.

@Vic, I agree it's a myth.

For conditioning purposes, I'd ALWAYS take low impact rope jumping over running if you're only going to do one or the other but I'm always surprised
this question comes up with all the slow footed boxers who were great at skipping rope (like Liston and Norton). It was great for my wind, stamina and coordination, but did nothing for my footwork. (I'll mention here that NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar remains in lean shape at 71 in part because he never stopped skipping rope, and he was the NBA Finals MVP over a legendary Celtics team in 1985 at age 38, winning the title again in his penultimate season, and reaching the finals in his last year, never a bit player but as a cornerstone of all his teams. Only seven players have played 20 years in the NBA, and Kareem was the first, breaking the then existing record of 16 seasons shared by four players. Kareem also took up yoga at 14, and the better part of 60 years doing that certainly hasn't hurt him either.)

I've known amateur boxing champions who died of complications from falls in old age (as did Bobby Chacon at just 64, and Schoolboy was known for his legs early on). Joe Louis and Bob Foster had horrendous footwork as referees, and boxers haven't done particularly well in Dancing With The Stars. That reference brings up what actually can improve footwork, foot speed, and mobility.

Like many girls, my mother jumped rope for play. Since boxers were the best at skipping rope, girls admired that. However, where my mother and many of her girlfriends actually did obtain their greatest lifelong benefit was through childhood dancing lessons. Many women decades younger have died after complications from falls, but my mother's own balance and ability to quickly shift weight between legs remains instinctive and excellent after some serious health issues and operations.

My father's slow and clumsy, although energetic and tireless. In high school, he ran distance track events and played right tackle on the gridiron, but this involves straightforward running. In their 40's and 50's though, both my parents played recreational volleyball, and it was the women with dance instruction experience who could move forward, backward and laterally, not the male ex jocks. (My girlfriend grew up playing tennis in Texas, and was nowhere near my mother's league in mobility at the same age when I met her. In fact, my girlfriend's prone to slipping, falling and hurting herself. I wouldn't put money on her surviving her 60's without terminal complications from an accidental fall.)

Skipping rope with the mouth clamped shut over a bite guard is phenomenal for developing wind, rhythm, timing, stamina and maintaining it indoors through the winter months and inclement weather, but despite certain different steps you can take to exercise muscles to support footwork and mobility.

Rope work is indispensable to boxing success, but since every successful boxer does it, if you're looking for an edge, dance instruction might be where to look for improving foot speed and mobility.

During high school, I went to plenty of dances, and the girls were always out on the gym floor. Those who could dance well and also played sports tended to have better mobility than the boys in those same sports. They could move side to side and backwards better, and tended to move together better. (Disco was popular at times, and girls who did the Hustle in choreographed groups on the dance floor together also tended to translate that well into sports team coordination.)

Most women in Florida when I was a kid could alternate instantly between bare feet (back before fire ants became prevalent), flip flops and high heels. My former step nephew has a wife with severe scoliosis who's also barely five feet tall. However, due to early dance lessons to help her deal with her scoliosis, she can transition between bare feet and high heels effortlessly (or any heel height in between).

As far as dancing being for pansies, Jimmy Cagney, George Raft and Patrick Swayze (whose mother Patsy became a dance instructor after taking up lessons to recover from a childhood car accident) certainly didn't suffer from wimpy images.
 
Jun 9, 2018
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#20
Well if you actually want good feet you have to practice it, a lot
Like 6 months, an hour a day
Do rope ladder drills, shuffle steps, v steps
Over and over and over

If you do dancing, try zumba or step classes
 
Likes: thehook13