Live action Mulan film to be streamed on Disney + for $30

May 25, 2013
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I was looking forward to this remake as the trailer looked good, but then the lead actress got all political and condoned the use of violence by the police. When you consider they have shot people in the head, tortured people in hospitals, sexually assaulted women, etc, I can't really watch this with a clear conscience.

Fuck Mulan and fuck Disney for not doing anything about it.
 

Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
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ET is most definitely not a Disney film. Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment were the production companies. Disney has become the devil and they are doing the devil's work. Just look at how they fucked up Star Wars beyond all repair.
Amblin. That's the company I was looking for.

I need to brush up on my once excellent film knowledge. Ring rust.
 
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Sittin Sonny

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Jun 10, 2013
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Wouldn't pay that much to watch one movie at home.

The Disney remakes are also getting progressively worse.

Finally, not keen on paying for pro China propaganda.

So, no. Won't be paying.

On top of all that, Disney also removed one of the main characters from the original because the PoundMeToo crowd was "offended" by something or other:

https://www.nydailynews.com/snyde/ny-li-shang-me-too-mulan-20200229-xz55d5zqbzc3jlurdo7cr25ygu-story.html

‘Mulan’ fan favorite removed from remake because of #MeToo climate

Li Shang, the beloved Disney love interest from the 1998 animated "Mulan," will not be the object of the warrior's affection in the upcoming live-action version...because of #MeToo (WALT DISNEY CO.)
 
Jul 6, 2019
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On top of all that, Disney also removed one of the main characters from the original because the PoundMeToo crowd was "offended" by something or other:

https://www.nydailynews.com/snyde/ny-li-shang-me-too-mulan-20200229-xz55d5zqbzc3jlurdo7cr25ygu-story.html

‘Mulan’ fan favorite removed from remake because of #MeToo climate

Li Shang, the beloved Disney love interest from the 1998 animated "Mulan," will not be the object of the warrior's affection in the upcoming live-action version...because of #MeToo (WALT DISNEY CO.)
Ah, it's a hate crime to fall for your boss.
 
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Jul 6, 2019
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Jun 14, 2012
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May 25, 2013
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Apparently its one of the biggest Mary Sue films ever. Disney let their bullshit social agenda ruin another film.
That and apparently removed all the charm of the original, removed the romantic relationship because the actor got #Me Too'ed and removed Mushu because the Chinese government thought it was offensive to the Chinese. Plus hard to root for a lead your meant to sympathise with when you know in real life she's a total cunt. I hope Disney make a massive loss from this.

As for Mary Sue might be down to agenda or just awful fucking writing. Nobody wants a lead character whether male or female to just go through the film like a boss and owning everything and everyone, you want struggle, set backs so when they achieve something it has meaning.
 

DynamicMoves

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Apparently its one of the biggest Mary Sue films ever. Disney let their bullshit social agenda ruin another film.
That and apparently removed all the charm of the original, removed the romantic relationship because the actor got #Me Too'ed and removed Mushu because the Chinese government thought it was offensive to the Chinese. Plus hard to root for a lead your meant to sympathise with when you know in real life she's a total cunt. I hope Disney make a massive loss from this.

As for Mary Sue might be down to agenda or just awful fucking writing. Nobody wants a lead character whether male or female to just go through the film like a boss and owning everything and everyone, you want struggle, set backs so when they achieve something it has meaning.
Well shit now I kind of want to watch it.
Not going to pay 30 for it though, that's insane.
 
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Bachafach^^^

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Apparently its one of the biggest Mary Sue films ever. Disney let their bullshit social agenda ruin another film.
I read that in Chinese culture, heroes are typically marked as special at birth. In contrast to western heroes who usually are put through various tribulations that build them up to a hero a Chinese heroic figure would have already carried a special power waiting to be unleashed through circumstance. As to why Mulan in this version starts off special. Again I read this as apart of a critique of Mulan so it could be bullshit.
 
Jun 14, 2012
14,092
6,662
I read that in Chinese culture, heroes are typically marked as special at birth. In contrast to western heroes who usually are put through various tribulations that build them up to a hero a Chinese heroic figure would have already carried a special power waiting to be unleashed through circumstance. As to why Mulan in this version starts off special. Again I read this as apart of a critique of Mulan so it could be bullshit.
There may be an element to that but it doesn't tend to work in films. I've seen the old Mulan film more times than I'd like to admit by virtue of my niece's loving it. By all accounts they removed the heart of the animated version. In the animated one the character had to struggle and overcome but in this its apparently "chi" that gets the job done. This has been a disaster for Disney.
 

Sittin Sonny

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The movie grossed about $23 mill in its opening weekend in China.


"The full weekend on Mulan was $29.1M from 17 offshore markets for a $37.6M international cume."

That total doesn't appear to include the Disney+ buys. The movie's budget was around $200 mill.
 

Sittin Sonny

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Fuck Disney.


Disney’s ‘Mulan’ Disaster Highlights Dangers of China Deals
The cost of doing business with Beijing has risen sharply and swiftly.

Disney’s Mulan has had a cursed run. First came the comments of its star Liu Yifei, who praised Hong Kong’s police amid the city’s pro-democracy demonstrations, causing outrage in the city. Then there was the pandemic, pushing back the film’s release date and leaving it stuck as an expensive add-on for home screening. When the movie was finally available, it turned out that its credits thanked the Chinese authorities in Xinjiang, where a few of the outdoor shots were filmed. Unfortunately, those authorities are also active participants in an ongoing genocide.

Then came the coldest blow. China, Disney’s last, best hope to turn the movie into a hit, silenced all coverage of the film on the mainland a couple of days before its release. All Disney’s pandering to Chinese authorities meant nothing as soon as there was a whiff of political trouble. With the movie already rated a grim 4.7 out of 10 on Douban, the most popular Chinese film review site, the chance of a word-of-mouth hit was small.

But when Disney began the project in 2015, the idea of a marquee blockbuster geared toward the Chinese market made sense. So, even, did filming in Xinjiang. To be sure, there were human rights issues, but from a cynical business perspective they were fringe concerns, not blared across the front page. U.S. lawmakers were making occasional noises about China, but the government wasn’t banning swathes of Chinese firms and the president wasn’t calling a deadly outbreak “the China virus.” Hong Kong was still an oasis of free speech, not an incipient police state. The whole of Hollywood had spent decades accepting China’s limits on movie content; the last movie criticizing China in any way had been made in 1997. Disney’s own executives had apologized to China’s leaders for making movies about Tibet.

The break-down of China-U.S. relations, combined with the intensification of domestic repression in China under President Xi and the new nationalism of Trumpism, have left businesses struggling to adjust as the ground shifts under their feet. A deal inked only a few years or even months ago can be destroyed overnight. The distance between what firms expected going into dealing with China, and what they’re now coping with, is enormous. To be sure, to some degree that applies to any foreign deal, especially between two countries with a contentious history. But the sheer speed with which the relationships between China and the rest of the world are snapping makes a mockery of the risk assessments of even a few years ago. Businesses are now left trying to span the China Gap between the conditions when they started a deal and today.

Disney isn’t the only foreign firm to have fallen into the China Gap. The NBA has lost hundreds of millions of dollars in television revenue after a controversy stemming from comments about Hong Kong. The English Premier League had its viewership in China slashed by a forced move to a less-watched sports channel because of Britain’s complaints over Hong Kong. Canadian canola oil producers lost their ability to export directly to China, their biggest market, for a year thanks to Canada’s arrest of a Huawei executive. Australian exporters have been repeatedly targeted as Australian-Chinese relations reach new lows. South Korean supermarket Lotte’s entire China operation was closed after a government-sponsored boycott over Seoul’s decision to install an American missile defense system, writing off a $9.6 billion investment.

But that doesn’t make sense today. China’s political pendulum has snapped clean off the chain. Barring Xi losing power, political paranoia and the xenophobia that comes with it are only going to grow, as they have done for the last eight years. And Washington’s new tone on Beijing isn’t going to disappear if President Trump loses. As Bill Bishop, writer of the Sinocism newsletter, likes to say about any given day, “Today is the best day in the Sino-US relationship for years, if not decades, to come.”

The other approach for multinational companies is to double down on compliance with Beijing’s wishes. That worked for the hotel chain Marriott, for instance, which offered abject apologies over an employee’s tweet. Foreign airlines complied with Beijing’s demands over Taiwan. Hong Kong-based businesses have lined up to kiss the boot after China’s new National Security Law. But that’s now coming with significant costs back home, as the NBA and Mulan scandals show. Businesses that comply with Chinese demands can expect to find themselves hauled up before Congressional committees, frozen out of U.S. government contracts, and pilloried in the international media.

Yet the temptation of the China market is still there. Finance companies, for instance, have rushed into the country in the last year, and brushed off warnings. That seems like a short-term approach, and one likely to leave them scrambling to get out of the gap that will open underneath them. “If you think China-US bilateral tensions will leave your market untouched, then, in the words of Hannah Gadsby, your confidence is making you stupid,” noted one China analyst. Firms still dreaming of 1.3 billion customers should wake up; even if you think you’re capable of dealing with the China of today, you have no idea what the China of tomorrow will bring.
 
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Bachafach^^^

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There may be an element to that but it doesn't tend to work in films. I've seen the old Mulan film more times than I'd like to admit by virtue of my niece's loving it. By all accounts they removed the heart of the animated version. In the animated one the character had to struggle and overcome but in this its apparently "chi" that gets the job done. This has been a disaster for Disney.
The original animated Mulan is brilliant. Probably my favorite Disney cartoon.

I might watch this when it's free in December just to see if I can point out any CCP propaganda.

Hero remains one of my all-time favorite films and it's riddled with Chinese historical propaganda and the IP man films are like their version of captain America and I really enjoyed those. But from everything I've read this is just a meh experience overall.
 
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kf3

Jul 17, 2012
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i never really saw ccp bolox in hero tbh. ccp approved maybe, but it's a film mostly made of scenes that are representing stories told by a man the viewer knows is lying. how much propaganda can be in a film that is 80% lies according the story of the film?

original jungle book is the best disney film by a mile imo.
 
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I’ll just admit, I don’t want to see anything chinese after this Corona pandemic which killed my mom.

who’s brilliant idea was it to release a Kung fu movie in the middle of all this?

I didn’t bother to watch the new Lion King either..

maybe I’m just getting old and these movies don’t cater to my age anymore..
 
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