Lockdown Recipe Club (no mumsnet). Only SIMPLE Meal Solutions Here!

Jun 5, 2013
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Nutmeg is the inner seed/nut, mace is the outer husk of it. But I don't think anyone calls it the meg. :lol: It's actually the other way round, mace is the stronger, you'd never put in the same amount of ground/powdered mace as nutmeg. Neither is exactly subtle but, as i'm sure you know if you already use it, if you use it sparingly the payoff is there. It's a bit secret spice, like asafoetida and fenugreek. Many people don't know about them and if they do they don't know how they can lift a dish by just adding a smidge.

As I mentioned, a little mace (or nutmeg) does great things for white-based sauces. If you can do parsley sauce (something else anathema to many thanks to school dinners) a bit of mace and a squeeze of lemon in the last few minutes of cooking elevates it hugely. Cauli cheese? Yep, mace that fucker too.



Similarly, I'll take a light or heavy sauce with it, it's just that balsamic cream jobby is my go-to. Piece of piss to make and it cloys beautifully onto the liver and mash. Toss some sliced mushrooms in there and fry them off before the balsamic, parsley and cream and you've got, to quote Jimmy Price from Layer Cake, "Food that'll make your bollocks tingle".

And don't forget the cheapest of the lot, chicken livers. Essential for the ragu, imo, and a great hors d'oeuvre type thing an old friend introduced me to when we were about 20 and I was just setting aside childish things re: shit I didn't used to eat.

Chicken livers and a sliver of fresh sage leaf (not a whole one, way too strong) wrapped in bacon, pinned together with a cocktail stick and roasted. Fucks sake. That with some warm, buttered crusty bread and wine or a dark beer and you are way into the how can something so simple be so good territory.
Ah, so mace is the headier part of the nut. Yeah, just a few scrapings against my nutmeg grater is enough for a pan of mashed spud. Very sparingly. Yes, fenugreek does something to most Curries but I have no idea what the other spice is, or how it’s pronounced.
Had a huge cauliflower cheese a few days ago and did the same with the nutmeg, but I’ll have to ge some mace next time and give it a go.

Funny how these robust spices add a little life to many a dish. The best shepherd’s pie recipe I’ve ever used and tasted has a bit of cinnamon in with the lamb during the browning stage. It just sits in the background, almost unnoticeable, even to the fucker who put it in the pan, but it adds something that definitely lifts the final dish.

Fuck yeah, chicken livers. I haven‘t used them in a while but pate was their most often destination.....or fried with onions, butter, garlic and some spices. Fucking beaut.
 
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Jun 5, 2013
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I cold smoked a real nice filet about a month ago and it was killer. I built a smoker that allows me to hot or cold smoke depending on what I'm smoking and I like to cold smoke fish, especially salmon and my home cured pork bellies for bacon and do this at under 100 degrees F.

I will smoke beef seasoned for jerky and will do that around 180 degrees to add smoke and slowly cook the meat as it dehydrates.

If doing things like chicken, Boston Butt pork roasts, beef briskets, etc., I'll crank it up to around 250-275 until done.
Fuck, I need to buy a smoker. A good one.


And a wood-fired pizza oven too. Though I’m not a huge fan of pizza, watching some videos on YouTube of people using them for bread, meat and fish has got me chomping at the bit.
 
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May 17, 2013
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If I were to buy one for smoking, I'd get an electric one with a good temperature control unit on it. I actually have 2 smokers, one an upright smoker with 2 grills near the top, a charcoal pan on the bottom and then a water pan suspended above it that I got from Home Depot several years ago.

The one I built, I can use either charcoal in the actual smoking box with wood chunks for smoke if wanting to do fairly high temperature cooking or hook up a side box with piping and use an electric hot plate with a stainless steel pan on it with wood pellets in it to cold smoke since the smoke has to travel several feet from the side box to the actual smoking box.

Smoking meats and fish takes your culinary skills to another level and is actually a lot of fun to do, but it can be a "hands on" thing keeping the temperature and smoke consistent during the curing/cooking process. You WILL smell like you've sat around a campfire all day until you are finished and can shower.
 
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Jun 5, 2013
10,864
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If I were to buy one for smoking, I'd get an electric one with a good temperature control unit on it. I actually have 2 smokers, one an upright smoker with 2 grills near the top, a charcoal pan on the bottom and then a water pan suspended above it that I got from Home Depot several years ago.

The one I built, I can use either charcoal in the actual smoking box with wood chunks for smoke if wanting to do fairly high temperature cooking or hook up a side box with piping and use an electric hot plate with a stainless steel pan on it with wood pellets in it to cold smoke since the smoke has to travel several feet from the side box to the actual smoking box.

Smoking meats and fish takes your culinary skills to another level and is actually a lot of fun to do, but it can be a "hands on" thing keeping the temperature and smoke consistent during the curing/cooking process. You WILL smell like you've sat around a campfire all day until you are finished and can shower.
I have one now but it's not purpoae built and the temperature control is crap.

I was thinking of something like this

13062

 
May 17, 2013
10,870
9,182
Louisiana
I have one now but it's not purpoae built and the temperature control is crap.

I was thinking of something like this

View attachment 13062


My neighbor has one just like that and he smoked a Boston Butt pork roast on it a couple weeks back after tasting one I cooked on my smoker and I've got to say I was not impressed. However, I took into account it was his very first attempt at smoking meat, so he may have erred a bit. I found it didn't take the smoke flavor very well even though he said he used the pellets the whole time.

Do some research on that smoker and read a lot of reviews to get some idea what to expect from it. Not all smokers are created equal, and that particular one is on the $$$$ side if I'm not mistaken.
 
Jun 5, 2013
10,864
8,165
Oz
My neighbor has one just like that and he smoked a Boston Butt pork roast on it a couple weeks back after tasting one I cooked on my smoker and I've got to say I was not impressed. However, I took into account it was his very first attempt at smoking meat, so he may have erred a bit. I found it didn't take the smoke flavor very well even though he said he used the pellets the whole time.

Do some research on that smoker and read a lot of reviews to get some idea what to expect from it. Not all smokers are created equal, and that particular one is on the $$$$ side if I'm not mistaken.
yeah, it’s quite pricey but I would shop around. It seems that electric ones seem to be rare. More homework required.
 
Jun 5, 2013
10,864
8,165
Oz
A few days ago, me and the Mrs were out shopping and decided to pop into a Vietnamese restaurant for lunch. I had a rare beef salad and the Mrs had a chicken one. Neither salad had rice noodles but had all the usual ingredients....red and white (Napa) cabbage, julienned carrots, beansprouts, red onion, mint, coriander, chopped roasted peanuts, fried shallots and meat. But the fucking dressing was out of this world.

I could literally eat salad every day for the rest of my life (with chicken, beef, lamb, duck, pork, etc.) as long as it was dressed like that one. I asked the cunts for the recipe but they sort of fucked me off.

Anyway, here’s one I’ve found that sort of could be right. Anyone have any experience of goi salad dressings?

  • 60ml fresh lime juice
  • 30ml water
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped palm sugar or honey
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 4 green shallots, ends trimmed, thinly sliced
  • 1 fresh red birdseye chilli, deseeded, finely chopped or one teaspoon of chilli/garlic sauce
  • 1 garlic clove, finely chopped, if not using chilli/garlic sauce
13094
 

DynamicMoves

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A few days ago, me and the Mrs were out shopping and decided to pop into a Vietnamese restaurant for lunch. I had a rare beef salad and the Mrs had a chicken one. Neither salad had rice noodles but had all the usual ingredients....red and white (Napa) cabbage, julienned carrots, beansprouts, red onion, mint, coriander, chopped roasted peanuts, fried shallots and meat. But the fucking dressing was out of this world.

I could literally eat salad every day for the rest of my life (with chicken, beef, lamb, duck, pork, etc.) as long as it was dressed like that one. I asked the cunts for the recipe but they sort of fucked me off.

Anyway, here’s one I’ve found that sort of could be right. Anyone have any experience of goi salad dressings?

  • 60ml fresh lime juice
  • 30ml water
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped palm sugar or honey
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 4 green shallots, ends trimmed, thinly sliced
  • 1 fresh red birdseye chilli, deseeded, finely chopped or one teaspoon of chilli/garlic sauce
  • 1 garlic clove, finely chopped, if not using chilli/garlic sauce
View attachment 13094
Here are a few from my mom's recipe book. She is from Vietnam, but kind of just collects recipes she likes regardless of authenticity. I can check my other Vietnamese cook book as well if you'd like.

GỎI XOÀI TÔM THỊT - Mango Salad with Shrimp and Pork

Cook 1.5 lbs. shrimp and 1.5 lbs. pork (boiled or steamed). When cool, slice pork in thin strips. Slice 1 yellow onion. Soak in water for 15 minutes. Drain and squeeze out the water. Put shrimp, pork, and onion together in a bowl. Add 2 julienned Asian cucumbers, 2 julienned green mangos, 2 julienned red bell peppers, chopped cilantro (ngò), chopped Vietnamese coriander (rau rạ m). Heat 2 tablespoons fish sauce and 2 tablespoons sugar until sugar dissolved. Add minced garlic and sriracha hot sauce and 1 tablespoon lime juice. In small batches, massage the dressing into the dry ingredients. Mix well. Top with fried onions

GỎI GÀ - Chicken Salad

Julienne 1/2 yellow onion and soak in cold water for 15 minutes. Drain and squeeze dry. Julienne 1/2 head of cabbage and 1 carrot. Mix with 1 tablespoon salt and let sit 10 minutes. Rinse and squeeze dry. Heat 2 tablespoons fish sauce and 2 tablespoons sugar until sugar dissolves. Let cool and add 1 tablespoon lime juice, 1 tablespoon minced garlic, and 1 tablespoon minced Thai red chili pepper. Combine cabbage, carrot, onion, 2 cups of cooked shredded chicken, 1/2 cup chopped green onions, 1/2 cup chopped mint, 1/2 cup chopped basil, 1/2 cup chopped cilantro. Massage prepared fish sauce (nước mắm pha) into salad in batches. Top with peanuts.

GỎI ĐU ĐỦ - Papaya Salad

Dissolve 3.5 tablespoons sugar in 2 cups warm water. Add 3 tablespoons soy sauce, 2 tablespoons fish sauce, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, 1/2 teaspoon red chili paste, 1/4 teaspoon salt. Set aside. Julienne 1 lb. green papaya. Rinse under cold water. Drain. Soak for 30 minutes in a bowl of iced water. Drain. Place papaya in a serving bowl. Pour dressing over. Add 1/4 cup chopped roasted peanuts and 2 tablespoons basil leaves. Toss well. Sprinkle salad with 6 oz. beef jerky. Garnish with basil leaves.

Edit: These are in way more detail than what I'd get if I just asked over the phone. Over the phone I normally get a list of ingredients with no measurements, and a general order.
 
Jun 5, 2013
10,864
8,165
Oz
Here are a few from my mom's recipe book. She is from Vietnam, but kind of just collects recipes she likes regardless of authenticity. I can check my other Vietnamese cook book as well if you'd like.

GỎI XOÀI TÔM THỊT - Mango Salad with Shrimp and Pork

Cook 1.5 lbs. shrimp and 1.5 lbs. pork (boiled or steamed). When cool, slice pork in thin strips. Slice 1 yellow onion. Soak in water for 15 minutes. Drain and squeeze out the water. Put shrimp, pork, and onion together in a bowl. Add 2 julienned Asian cucumbers, 2 julienned green mangos, 2 julienned red bell peppers, chopped cilantro (ngò), chopped Vietnamese coriander (rau rạ m). Heat 2 tablespoons fish sauce and 2 tablespoons sugar until sugar dissolved. Add minced garlic and sriracha hot sauce and 1 tablespoon lime juice. In small batches, massage the dressing into the dry ingredients. Mix well. Top with fried onions

GỎI GÀ - Chicken Salad

Julienne 1/2 yellow onion and soak in cold water for 15 minutes. Drain and squeeze dry. Julienne 1/2 head of cabbage and 1 carrot. Mix with 1 tablespoon salt and let sit 10 minutes. Rinse and squeeze dry. Heat 2 tablespoons fish sauce and 2 tablespoons sugar until sugar dissolves. Let cool and add 1 tablespoon lime juice, 1 tablespoon minced garlic, and 1 tablespoon minced Thai red chili pepper. Combine cabbage, carrot, onion, 2 cups of cooked shredded chicken, 1/2 cup chopped green onions, 1/2 cup chopped mint, 1/2 cup chopped basil, 1/2 cup chopped cilantro. Massage prepared fish sauce (nước mắm pha) into salad in batches. Top with peanuts.

GỎI ĐU ĐỦ - Papaya Salad

Dissolve 3.5 tablespoons sugar in 2 cups warm water. Add 3 tablespoons soy sauce, 2 tablespoons fish sauce, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, 1/2 teaspoon red chili paste, 1/4 teaspoon salt. Set aside. Julienne 1 lb. green papaya. Rinse under cold water. Drain. Soak for 30 minutes in a bowl of iced water. Drain. Place papaya in a serving bowl. Pour dressing over. Add 1/4 cup chopped roasted peanuts and 2 tablespoons basil leaves. Toss well. Sprinkle salad with 6 oz. beef jerky. Garnish with basil leaves.

Edit: These are in way more detail than what I'd get if I just asked over the phone. Over the phone I normally get a list of ingredients with no measurements, and a general order.
Nice one. It’s the dressing that makes these salads and I’ll give them a go. They do seem heavy on the fish sauce, compared to the lime though, but my plan is to make a large batch of the salad I mentioned (almost identical to yours) and about four or five dressing, based on what I already have and slight tweaks and variations, just to hit my sweet spot.

Will definitely try the papaya salad too. Fucking love it ....in fact, Vietnamese is my favourite food from SE Asia.
 
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DynamicMoves

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Nice one. It’s the dressing that makes these salads and I’ll give them a go. They do seem heavy on the fish sauce, compared to the lime though, but my plan is to make a large batch of the salad I mentioned (almost identical to yours) and about four or five dressing, based on what I already have and slight tweaks and variations, just to hit my sweet spot.

Will definitely try the papaya salad too. Fucking love it ....in fact, Vietnamese is my favourite food from SE Asia.
I keep a mason jar full of prepared fish sauce (nước mắm pha) in my fridge, as it is also just a dipping sauce. It's the stuff you get on the side when you order egg rolls or a noodle dish.
I've made the prepared fish sauce with a 1 to 1 fish sauce to lime, and while my in-laws liked it enough it didn't taste right to me.

Here's the recipe for a larger amount.

Soak 1 teaspoon hot pepper in 1
tablespoon white vinegar for 2
minutes.
Combine 1/2 cup fish sauce, 1/4
cup lime juice, 1 shredded carrot, 2
minced garlic cloves, 1/2 cup sugar.
Stir in 1.5 cups warm water and
hot pepper mixture. Stir.
Serve at room temp.
Can be used for rolled-up rice paper
dishes, bánh cuốn (crepes), or many
other dishes.
 
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Ronsonfly

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fish sauce (nước mắm pha)
Does that stuff actually go off? I've got some that's way past its Best Before date (like, at least a couple of years after) and it stinks pretty bad.

But it stinks pretty bad when it's first unstoppered, so who can know?

There's another fish product that is popular in SEA but many westerners can't stand it. In Cambodia it's known as prahok but I don't know the other regional names. Anyway, it's been linked strongly with bile duct cancer because of the parasitic flukes that don't get killed during fermentation.
 

DynamicMoves

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Does that stuff actually go off? I've got some that's way past its Best Before date (like, at least a couple of years after) and it stinks pretty bad.

But it stinks pretty bad when it's first unstoppered, so who can know?

There's another fish product that is popular in SEA but many westerners can't stand it. In Cambodia it's known as prahok but I don't know the other regional names. Anyway, it's been linked strongly with bile duct cancer because of the parasitic flukes that don't get killed during fermentation.
No idea. I've almost out of mine after about 3 months. Getting about time to make another batch.
 

Ronsonfly

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May 8, 2013
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No idea. I've almost out of mine after about 3 months. Getting about time to make another batch.
Fair enough. I just looked at this and it seems it's too fucking noxious to go bad, as this gem from Reddit confirms. :rofl

grainzzz

5 years ago · edited 5 years ago

If it smells good, throw it out.
It does seem to last quite well, though, so maybe I won't bin the one I've lined up for disposal.

 

DynamicMoves

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Fair enough. I just looked at this and it seems it's too fucking noxious to go bad, as this gem from Reddit confirms. :rofl



It does seem to last quite well, though, so maybe I won't bin the one I've lined up for disposal.

Just a note, there is a difference between fish sauce straight from the bottle and prepared fish sauce.

13099

The left is prepared fish sauce, it's the dipping sauce that is served in restaurants. The right is fish sauce, which is an ingredient.
 
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Ronsonfly

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In a deplorable basket
Just a note, there is a difference between fish sauce straight from the bottle and prepared fish sauce.

View attachment 13099

The left is prepared fish sauce, it's the dipping sauce that is served in restaurants. The right is fish sauce, which is an ingredient.
It's the bottled stuff I'm talking about. I seldom use that, hence it being two years out of date and virtually still full and have never "prepared" fish sauce in my life. :lol: I wouldn't know where to start without looking it up and would likely use it on no more, or possibly even fewer, occasions than the bottled ingredient.
 
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DynamicMoves

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It's the bottled stuff I'm talking about. I seldom use that, hence it being two years out of date and virtually still full and have never "prepared" fish sauce in my life. :lol: I wouldn't know where to start without looking it up and would likely use it on no more, or possibly even fewer, occasions than the bottled ingredient.
The bottled stuff won't go bad for a long time. I wouldn't worry unless there was mold.

Here's the recipe for prepared fish sauce.
Nước Mắm Pha - Prepared Fish Sauce, or Dipping Sauce, literally translated means fish sauce mixed. Another word may be Nước Chấm, which literally translates to dipping sauce. It's the same stuff.

Soak 1 teaspoon hot pepper in 1 tablespoon white vinegar for 2 minutes.

Combine 1/2 cup fish sauce, 1/4 cup lime juice, 1 shredded carrot, 2 minced garlic cloves, 1/2 cup sugar.

Stir in 1.5 cups warm water and hot pepper mixture. Stir.

Serve at room temp.

Can be used for rolled-up rice paper dishes, bánh cuốn (crepes), or many other dishes.
 
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Ronsonfly

Toxic White Male
May 8, 2013
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In a deplorable basket
The bottled stuff won't go bad for a long time. I wouldn't worry unless there was mold.

Here's the recipe for prepared fish sauce.
Sound, thanks very much. I've got everything to make that so I'll give it a go. And there's no mould on the sauce, it looks fine, it's just pungent. As was the shrimp paste I used to have but I got sick of that stuff being in the fridge. Unless it's in an airtight container, the smell is there as soon as you open the door.
 
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May 17, 2013
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Louisiana
Was in the market today and had an urge to fix a pot of split pea soup. So I bought a bag of dried split peas and came home to take out seasoning ham and some chicken stock out of the freezer, cut up a medium onion, a few cloves of garlic, some pepper, Worcestershire sauce and got them on the stove for dinner tonight.

That should make the wife very happy since that is one of her life's simple pleasures, a hot bowl of soup to be eaten with a few saltine crackers with butter.
 
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Jun 5, 2013
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I keep a mason jar full of prepared fish sauce (nước mắm pha) in my fridge, as it is also just a dipping sauce. It's the stuff you get on the side when you order egg rolls or a noodle dish.
I've made the prepared fish sauce with a 1 to 1 fish sauce to lime, and while my in-laws liked it enough it didn't taste right to me.

Here's the recipe for a larger amount.

Soak 1 teaspoon hot pepper in 1
tablespoon white vinegar for 2
minutes.
Combine 1/2 cup fish sauce, 1/4
cup lime juice, 1 shredded carrot, 2
minced garlic cloves, 1/2 cup sugar.
Stir in 1.5 cups warm water and
hot pepper mixture. Stir.
Serve at room temp.
Can be used for rolled-up rice paper
dishes, bánh cuốn (crepes), or many
other dishes.
what’s the ‘hot pepper’ in line one of the ingredients? Dried chilli flakes?