Lockdown Recipe Club (no mumsnet). Only SIMPLE Meal Solutions Here!

May 17, 2013
11,076
9,477
Louisiana
Last night I surprised the wife with bell peppers stuffed with shrimp dressing and had a nice pot of red gravy to go over some al dente vermicelli to finish off the meal.

A local market was selling large bell peppers at 3 for $1, so I got 6 of them to stuff and the wife went out a couple weeks ago and got 25 lbs. of beautiful freshly caught shrimp that I shelled and put up in the freezer for later use---------so it was time to use some.

Tonight is going to be simple with potato/leek soup and a nice garden salad. I bought a bundle of leeks a couple days ago and have cut them up to wash all the grit out of them to go into the pot later today and the liquid will be a rich homemade chicken stock I made earlier in the week.
 

Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
33,979
8,900
Donny
And there's the respect. More mackerel today after an early doors training session involving weights and burpees.

View attachment 15502
Bet it smelled like a beaver down at your place, A. I do like fish, but hell does it stink out the place if you're poor like me and live in a small place. I've been known to reheat fish in the staffroom at work - I'm immediately labelled Public Enemy Number 1 after this.

That food looks nice.
 

Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
33,979
8,900
Donny
Throwback to my schooldays with sardines in tommy K (31p a tin from Lidl) on a crust. :good

View attachment 15405
I really like those fish in greasy oils, A. John West do them, you kind of boil the tin for a couple of minutes until it's piping hot and then burn your hand trying to get the fish out. Stick said fish with bread and butter and you've quite definitely got food of gods straight in front of you. The John West stuff is pricey though, it's like £1.70 a tin, and you need three tins to make yourself full.
 
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Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
33,979
8,900
Donny
Last night I surprised the wife with bell peppers stuffed with shrimp dressing and had a nice pot of red gravy to go over some al dente vermicelli to finish off the meal.

A local market was selling large bell peppers at 3 for $1, so I got 6 of them to stuff and the wife went out a couple weeks ago and got 25 lbs. of beautiful freshly caught shrimp that I shelled and put up in the freezer for later use---------so it was time to use some.

Tonight is going to be simple with potato/leek soup and a nice garden salad. I bought a bundle of leeks a couple days ago and have cut them up to wash all the grit out of them to go into the pot later today and the liquid will be a rich homemade chicken stock I made earlier in the week.
Did your surprise get you a bit of 'something something' Gumbo? Women love it when you treat them well with nice food. I have often been successful with the ladies on the strength of my seafood pasta.
 

Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
33,979
8,900
Donny
Absolutely beautiful. I’m envious right now as they’re difficult to find here.

A quick splash of tabasco and maybe a touch of black pepper.....and a cup of strong tea. Perfect lunch
Ya know what, Mattress, Tabasco is pretty much the cure for life's ills. A panacea, if you will. Put that fucking stuff with most every decent savoury dish and it supercharges it in a matter of seconds.
 
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Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
33,979
8,900
Donny
Yes indeed. They're 49p a tin though and I can't justify the extra 18p as I can't tell the difference. It's all just fish to this philistine bro. :lol:
Heading up to the John West level shows the difference. Tesco do a decent cheap tinned mackerel.

St John's Wood is the only tube station on the whole of the London Underground which doesn't contain any of the letters in the word 'mackerel'. Bet you've heard that a billion times before. Here's a billion and one.
 
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May 17, 2013
11,076
9,477
Louisiana
Hit Costco yesterday and picked up a nice 5.5 lb. chunk of eye of round roast. That is what I use to make beef jerky and when I got home I trimmed it up and sliced it to season and marinade overnight in the fridge to finish off today in the smoker. I got exactly 40 cuts out of that roast and they are almost done now since I put them on early this a.m. before sunrise. I pulled off a couple of the small pieces that were done to my liking and DAMN, they are good.

I also picked up a 10 lb. pork belly that I cut about 1/3 of it up to make cracklin and will do that when the wife gets back home from running some errands. The rest I put in the freezer to use to make my own bacon in a few weeks after I defrost it and marinade it for about a week prior to smoking.

As for tonight's dinner, I pulled out a nice piece of pork tenderloin that I will season and grill and have some new potatoes seasoned with olive oil and various herbs and spices, along with some yard long beans from the garden that I prepared and froze about 2 months ago.
 

Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
33,979
8,900
Donny
Hit Costco yesterday and picked up a nice 5.5 lb. chunk of eye of round roast. That is what I use to make beef jerky and when I got home I trimmed it up and sliced it to season and marinade overnight in the fridge to finish off today in the smoker. I got exactly 40 cuts out of that roast and they are almost done now since I put them on early this a.m. before sunrise. I pulled off a couple of the small pieces that were done to my liking and DAMN, they are good.

I also picked up a 10 lb. pork belly that I cut about 1/3 of it up to make cracklin and will do that when the wife gets back home from running some errands. The rest I put in the freezer to use to make my own bacon in a few weeks after I defrost it and marinade it for about a week prior to smoking.

As for tonight's dinner, I pulled out a nice piece of pork tenderloin that I will season and grill and have some new potatoes seasoned with olive oil and various herbs and spices, along with some yard long beans from the garden that I prepared and froze about 2 months ago.
Where I work there's a market that has fresh meat butchers dotted around it. It is my kind of heaven.
 
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May 17, 2013
11,076
9,477
Louisiana
Where I work there's a market that has fresh meat butchers dotted around it. It is my kind of heaven.
True butchers are kind of a dying breed here in the States. Yes, there are real butcher shops still around, but they are few and far between.

I'll make a guess that most of the employees at supermarkets in the States who work in the meat department are not real butchers, but rather meat processors. Most supermarkets receive the meat already parted out in big cases from the big processing plants and all they do is cut it up in smaller portions, make ground meat and sausages and get it ready to package for display. They no longer receive whole hogs, lambs and cows to break down at the supermarket.

Years ago you could go to a supermarket and talk to the butcher and get your weight in beef bones free for the taking to be used to make homemade beef stocks. Now, they just shake their heads and say they can't help you since all that is left behind at the processing plants.
 
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Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
33,979
8,900
Donny
True butchers are kind of a dying breed here in the States. Yes, there are real butcher shops still around, but they are few and far between.

I'll make a guess that most of the employees at supermarkets in the States who work in the meat department are not real butchers, but rather meat processors. Most supermarkets receive the meat already parted out in big cases from the big processing plants and all they do is cut it up in smaller portions, make ground meat and sausages and get it ready to package for display. They no longer receive whole hogs, lambs and cows to break down at the supermarket.

Years ago you could go to a supermarket and talk to the butcher and get your weight in beef bones free for the taking to be used to make homemade beef stocks. Now, they just shake their heads and say they can't help you since all that is left behind at the processing plants.
Where I live (not where I work) I have two butchers close by me. One is better than the other and more old school. It's the old school we need back.
 
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May 17, 2013
11,076
9,477
Louisiana
Where I live (not where I work) I have two butchers close by me. One is better than the other and more old school. It's the old school we need back.
My grandpa on my dad's side was a butcher and had his own small shop right next to his house back in the 50's when I was just a little kid. Nobody had A/C back then and in the summer months I'd go in his little shop and go into the meat locker that was kept in the mid 30's to keep the meat cold to cool off from time to time.

Right across the street from the house was a stockyard that would get cattle on a regular basis to be sold for slaughter. A couple blocks away from the stockyard was a series of huge cold storage buildings that would store the cows and pigs before shipping it out to butchers and markets around town.

About 3 blocks from my house was an abattoir that was in operation until I hit my teens.
 
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Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
33,979
8,900
Donny
My grandpa on my dad's side was a butcher and had his own small shop right next to his house back in the 50's when I was just a little kid. Nobody had A/C back then and in the summer months I'd go in his little shop and go into the meat locker that was kept in the mid 30's to keep the meat cold to cool off from time to time.

Right across the street from the house was a stockyard that would get cattle on a regular basis to be sold for slaughter. A couple blocks away from the stockyard was a series of huge cold storage buildings that would store the cows and pigs before shipping it out to butchers and markets around town.

About 3 blocks from my house was an abattoir that was in operation until I hit my teens.
Though I'm not nearly as old as you are I can remember being a small child and my parents would shop at both the butchers and the bakers. There was one of each in walking distance of our house. This is a rarity in this country now. Where I currently live one of the butchers is a five minute drive, the other a ten minute drive. There isn't a decent bakery around near me...it's a train ride or twenty minutes in a car. Conversely there are three supermarkets in walking distance of me that sell meat that has been filled with water to make it last longer and weigh more so the shops can charge more.

I long for the old days. Your set up of days gone by sounds idyllic. It doesn't happen anymore.
 
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May 17, 2013
11,076
9,477
Louisiana
Though I'm not nearly as old as you are I can remember being a small child and my parents would shop at both the butchers and the bakers. There was one of each in walking distance of our house. This is a rarity in this country now. Where I currently live one of the butchers is a five minute drive, the other a ten minute drive. There isn't a decent bakery around near me...it's a train ride or twenty minutes in a car. Conversely there are three supermarkets in walking distance of me that sell meat that has been filled with water to make it last longer and weigh more so the shops can charge more.

I long for the old days. Your set up of days gone by sounds idyllic. It doesn't happen anymore.
There's certain aspects of those bygone days I'd love to see come back, but there's also a fair share of it I'd not want to deal with again in my lifetime.

You mentioned bakeries and there were many of them that were owned by locals that ran their "Mom & Pop" operations 6 days a week and offered wonderful baked goods at a fair price. I remember one in particular that we'd pass when heading uptown to my grandma's house. They had a revolving red light outside their shop that would be lit and turning whenever they had hot French bread come out their ovens. We'd stop and pick up a couple loaves and their aroma would fill the car on the 15 minute drive to granny's house. And once we got there we'd cut the bread and break out the butter and fill cups with cafe' au lait to wash it down.

The biggest downside in living in the deep south at that time was the oppressive heat and humidity in the summer months that was at least 4 months out of the year. You couldn't escape the heat in the daytime even with fans in the house. I remember when I got small jobs to make some money as young as 12 years old and using some of it to head downtown by bus to go to the movie theaters and I'd sit through 2 or more showings of the movie just to be in air-conditioning. It was even advertised on their marquee and in the local papers entertainment section that the theaters were air conditioned to attract more customers.

It is sometimes very easy to look back at those times with the proverbial rose colored glasses. As humans, we tend to forget about a lot of the hardships that our earlier lives had us facing and tend to focus on mostly positive aspects. But then again, who wants to remember that crap anyway.
 
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Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
33,979
8,900
Donny
There's certain aspects of those bygone days I'd love to see come back, but there's also a fair share of it I'd not want to deal with again in my lifetime.

You mentioned bakeries and there were many of them that were owned by locals that ran their "Mom & Pop" operations 6 days a week and offered wonderful baked goods at a fair price. I remember one in particular that we'd pass when heading uptown to my grandma's house. They had a revolving red light outside their shop that would be lit and turning whenever they had hot French bread come out their ovens. We'd stop and pick up a couple loaves and their aroma would fill the car on the 15 minute drive to granny's house. And once we got there we'd cut the bread and break out the butter and fill cups with cafe' au lait to wash it down.

The biggest downside in living in the deep south at that time was the oppressive heat and humidity in the summer months that was at least 4 months out of the year. You couldn't escape the heat in the daytime even with fans in the house. I remember when I got small jobs to make some money as young as 12 years old and using some of it to head downtown by bus to go to the movie theaters and I'd sit through 2 or more showings of the movie just to be in air-conditioning. It was even advertised on their marquee and in the local papers entertainment section that the theaters were air conditioned to attract more customers.

It is sometimes very easy to look back at those times with the proverbial rose colored glasses. As humans, we tend to forget about a lot of the hardships that our earlier lives had us facing and tend to focus on mostly positive aspects. But then again, who wants to remember that crap anyway.
I like that post. It would fit well into the pages of a book on social observation.

The heat aspect of your part of the world (more specifically your part of the US) is what puts me off a little. The first time I ever got to the US was by way of London Heathrow - Kennedy Airport, NYC. I'll never forget getting off the plane the first time, walking into the fresh air - the heat just smacked you in the face, but it became bearable. I would imagine where you are it's relentless.

What I miss about the old days in this country are pubs. They're dying now faster than ever before. Covid is killing the trade. I've only been in two or three pubs since they started back open (I don't drink alcohol anymore) and it's just not the same. Even ten, fifteen years ago pubs were better than they are now. Now they're not pubs, merely eateries that sell drinks it seems, and that's sad. Sure there's pubs around, but there's fewer that are just pubs and not pubs with food. There's even fewer that are decent 'proper' pubs. My Dad is a little older than you, and he was brought up playing darts in pubs and travelling the country doing so. Although he was never a big (or problem) drinker he like a pint after work, and even he now admits we'll never get back to the old pub days

I think you should listen to Village Green album by The Kinks, Gumbo. It's pretty much an album which paints a beautiful picture of England in the 1960s. It's on YouTube...or here...

 
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ant-man

Go get the papers get the papers.
Jun 11, 2014
11,125
10,049
Round and about
Did my sunday sprints session earlier today and then hit the weights for half an hour or so. It's been so hot I've not eaten much other than a protein shake and some fruit. Time for scrambled eggs now.

15528
 
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ant-man

Go get the papers get the papers.
Jun 11, 2014
11,125
10,049
Round and about
Covid is killing the trade. I've only been in two or three pubs since they started back open (I don't drink alcohol anymore) and it's just not the same.
What's the current pub experience like T? I have some friends who are seasoned pissheads but who say they just don't bother anymore.

Here's a real old American classic I just necked for our fine friends across the pond. A 100% peanuts peanut butter and jelly (note I use the US term and not the English 'jam') sammidge. Made with strawberry flavour (or should that be flavor :smile), though I believe the traditional version is grape.

15534
 
May 17, 2013
11,076
9,477
Louisiana
What's the current pub experience like T? I have some friends who are seasoned pissheads but who say they just don't bother anymore.

Here's a real old American classic I just necked for our fine friends across the pond. A 100% peanuts peanut butter and jelly (note I use the US term and not the English 'jam') sammidge. Made with strawberry flavour (or should that be flavor :smile), though I believe the traditional version is grape.

View attachment 15534
Can't beat the classic "PB&J" sandwich. Or better yet, go with the "Elvis Presley Special" of grilled or fried peanut butter and banana sandwich. Simple to make by putting peanut butter on one slice of bread, mashed bananas on the other slice, put them together and melt a bit of butter in a pan and brown the bread like you would a grilled cheese sandwich.
 
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