Musician's death that really effected you...

Juiceboxbiotch

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May 16, 2013
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No, actually I knew that...even before you mentioned it subsequently in one of your posts. I saw Rush live in 1989...or about the time that "Time Stand Still" was new. They were great, I must say, but I must say that my favorite band or "ensemble" lol,...of all time is Yes....and Emerson, Lake and Palmer after them.
I grew up on Yes and ELP. That shits in my bloodstream.
 

Juiceboxbiotch

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Really? Is that what Bill Bruford said? He may have liked Peart's drumming, ..."but..he cites Max Roach, Joe Morello, Art Blakey, and Ginger Baker as his favourite and the most influential drummers as a youngster." Your "science " is a bit off....,but wait,....I think Peart is Donald Trump's favorite drummer...
Yeah I wouldn't have thought Bill Bruford (or Carl Palmer) would mention Neil Peart on any of his "best of" lists. Bruford of course was playing on Yes and King Crimson records years before Rush found Neil Peart, and believe it or not @SwollenGoat not everyone puts Peart on that pedestal. Not that those guys don't appreciate Peart's playing, I'm sure they do.

This is my personal take. I find that there are 2 basic 'schools' of rock drumming. The jazz/rock side and the rock/metal side. Of course there are drummers who blended the schools, and there are drummers who came up in one and ditched it for the other (Peart is an example of that). My favorite drummer is Jon Theodore. He lists Bruford, Bonham, and Baker, and is more of a jazz stylist who hits hard and plays rock. But my other favorite drummer is Danny Carey... who puts Peart at the top. Another guy who really sounds stylistically like Peart is Mike Portnoy of Dream Theater. These are more rock/metal guys...which is kind of the direction Rush took when they replaced their first drummer with Peart. Before that they had a more 'classic rock' and less of a 'prog metal' sound (see the early Rush song "Working Man".. the studio version has someone not named Neil Peart playing drums).

An observation I've made is that the 2 'schools' I mentioned basically have calling cards... and it mostly has to do with the size of their drumsets. Dudes like Bruford, Baker, and Theodore mostly played on simple smaller kits with 2-3 toms and single bass drum. Dudes from the other school couldn't have enough drums in their drumsets. So many drums, holy shit. Peart of course is the king of that, rocking a full 360 drumset with 3 or more kick drums, 30 or so cymbols, several e-pads, and only a tiny space left open to get himself in there!
 
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SwollenGoat

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May 17, 2013
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Yeah I wouldn't have thought Bill Bruford (or Carl Palmer) would mention Neil Peart on any of his "best of" lists. Bruford of course was playing on Yes and King Crimson records years before Rush found Neil Peart, and believe it or not @SwollenGoat not everyone puts Peart on that pedestal. Not that those guys don't appreciate Peart's playing, I'm sure they do.

This is my personal take. I find that there are 2 basic 'schools' of rock drumming. The jazz/rock side and the rock/metal side. Of course there are drummers who blended the schools, and there are drummers who came up in one and ditched it for the other (Peart is an example of that). My favorite drummer is Jon Theodore. He lists Bruford, Bonham, and Baker, and is more of a jazz stylist who hits hard and plays rock. But my other favorite drummer is Danny Carey... who puts Peart at the top. Another guy who really sounds stylistically like Peart is Mike Portnoy of Dream Theater. These are more rock/metal guys...which is kind of the direction Rush took when they replaced their first drummer with Peart. Before that they had a more 'classic rock' and less of a 'prog metal' sound (see the early Rush song "Working Man".. the studio version has someone not named Neil Peart playing drums).

An observation I've made is that the 2 'schools' I mentioned basically have calling cards... and it mostly has to do with the size of their drumsets. Dudes like Bruford, Baker, and Theodore mostly played on simple smaller kits with 2-3 toms and single bass drum. Dudes from the other school couldn't have enough drums in their drumsets. So many drums, holy shit. Peart of course is the king of that, rocking a full 360 drumset with 3 or more kick drums, 30 or so cymbols, several e-pads, and only a tiny space left open to get himself in there!
I was half joking with the 'yer favorite drummer' remark...............of course there were great drummers who preceded him.............

That said,Rutsey wasnt so much responsible for their hard rock sound on the first album..............being 19 year old kids who has yet to develop musically was...........Peart only helped push them where they were bound to go,IMHO

Ive got to say,I find bands like Dream Theater .................soulless............technically proficient obviously but...........empty

Id say the same about a guy like Billy Sheehan.............

ANyway,I love the first Rush album for its crazy kid rawness and,of course,Alex's guitar hero antics

Neil,after that,lifted them to another level.............and part of it was just how slyly HEAVY they were...........YES and King Crimson were 'prog'..............Rush was,at times,like some sort of heavy prg speed metal and their TONE ws amazing...........songs like Cygnus X-1 were a million times heavier than anything else at the time and yet folks seemed unaware...........

its the HEAVY in their prog that I loved methinks
 
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Phantom

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May 17, 2013
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I was half joking with the 'yer favorite drummer' remark...............of course there were great drummers who preceded him.............

That said,Rutsey wasnt so much responsible for their hard rock sound on the first album..............being 19 year old kids who has yet to develop musically was...........Peart only helped push them where they were bound to go,IMHO

Ive got to say,I find bands like Dream Theater .................soulless............technically proficient obviously but...........empty

Id say the same about a guy like Billy Sheehan.............

ANyway,I love the first Rush album for its crazy kid rawness and,of course,Alex's guitar hero antics

Neil,after that,lifted them to another level.............and part of it was just how slyly HEAVY they were...........YES and King Crimson were 'prog'..............Rush was,at times,like some sort of heavy prg speed metal and their TONE ws amazing...........songs like Cygnus X-1 were a million times heavier than anything else at the time and yet folks seemed unaware...........

its the HEAVY in their prog that I loved methinks
Oh sure you were...after all, it's science man,..it's science... :hey
 

Phantom

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May 17, 2013
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I grew up on Yes and ELP. That shits in my bloodstream.
Great musical pedigree to have IMHO. I've always been the lone ranger so to speak, among my friends growing up when it came to musical tastes. Not too many Yes or ELP fans among them...though plenty who considered Pink Floyd as "prog-rock"...though I always thought of them as "space rock" sorta...
What's your opinion of that much disparaged Yes album of 1980...."Drama",...when Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes replaced Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman?
 

Juiceboxbiotch

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May 16, 2013
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Great musical pedigree to have IMHO. I've always been the lone ranger so to speak, among my friends growing up when it came to musical tastes. Not too many Yes or ELP fans among them...though plenty who considered Pink Floyd as "prog-rock"...though I always thought of them as "space rock" sorta...
What's your opinion of that much disparaged Yes album of 1980...."Drama",...when Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes replaced Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman?
I love that record lol. It was the last good thing they did before they went full 80's, and it was the last Yes record Steve Howe played on for quite a while.
 
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Phantom

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May 17, 2013
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I love that record lol. It was the last good thing they did before they went full 80's, and it was the last Yes record Steve Howe played on for quite a while.
Yes indeed "full 80's"...when Trevor #2 attempted in turning the great Yes into a "Top 40 Hit Machine"...which wasn't a natural thing at all. ....On the other hand, Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes are both brilliant and underrated. Their contributions to Yes were brilliant and very worthy of the Yes catalog.
 
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