Rate The Last Film You Watched

SwollenGoat

Deicide
May 17, 2013
63,281
22,582
The House that Peterbilt
Pitch Black (2000) - 4K Restoration

View attachment 15376

One of the great lowish-budget movies of the 2000s is a perfect example how to make most of limited resources and a charismatic lead. The lighting, pre-digital coloring via filters, the claustrophobic dark atmosphere, the shock scares and some religious and philosophical thoughts just thrown over a minimalistic story somehow works to the tee. Then-unknown Vin Diesel playing a psycho killer and questioning ppl's morality in crisis helps too, it's well scripted, and remarkable how good it looks in 4K restoration. The skin textures, and non-human interactions, the overblown bright scenes and the pitch black ones are fully detailed and sound design matches the quality. While it wasn't entirely low budget but rather mid, David Twohy's tight, paced direction with enough human touch between shock and action made every penny thrown at it count. VERY HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
did not like

the idea was great

I seem to remember the execution sucked

I WANTED to like it......................
 
Jul 29, 2012
18,788
3,997
Belfast, Ireland
I'm Thinking of Ending Things (2020)


Liked this a lot actually. Have never even seen any of Kaufman's famous work like Synecdoche, New York (2008) but I found this one very engaging. Obviously very much falling into a general postmodern, absurdist kind of tone.

For a film ostensibly about a failing relationship it's not so much propelled by the drama between the characters as by the sheer strangeness of their interactions. Even from the start things seem a little off between the couple and they only get weirder and weirder when they reach the boyfriend's family farm. Nothing appears to be as it seems...However, while this constant shifting did frequently throw me off somewhat, it was more like an enjoyable puzzle.

In any case I didn't think it was really all that difficult to follow once I grasped the main contours of Kaufman was getting at. To me it was fundamentally about the ravages of time and the unreliability of memory. The film simply struck me as an exploration of this general theme and the surreal, postmodern aspects of its style essentially an outward manifestation of internal memory loss - presumably connected with dementia, alzheimers and so on. Connected to this it also seemed very much concerned with the things which make up the self, particularly the self we wish to portray to others - on some level we internalise our interests, the authors we like and so on, quoting from them as if we had written them ourselves. We are the books we read, and at least in some regard reflect how we want others to perceive us. This idea comes through quite strongly in the various conversations the characters have about the art, films, philosophy, and so on. Of course, the self is also built up by our past experiences and relationships, whether with our parents or others.

Trying to not delve into any specific spoiler talk either, but it's not to say I understood every single thing about the film. It clearly revels in ambiguity to a certain extent and opens itself up to more specific interpretations - there is a lot to unpack no doubt - but in broad stroke terms the ideas are relatively clear. All in all I thought it was a very enjoyable, intriguing experience watching it.
 
Reactions: kf3 and Hookjaw

NSFW

Freedom Fighter
May 14, 2013
23,796
12,589
Castle Duckula.
I'm Thinking of Ending Things (2020)


Liked this a lot actually. Have never even seen any of Kaufman's famous work like Synecdoche, New York (2008) but I found this one very engaging. Obviously very much falling into a general postmodern, absurdist kind of tone.

For a film ostensibly about a failing relationship it's not so much propelled by the drama between the characters as by the sheer strangeness of their interactions. Even from the start things seem a little off between the couple and they only get weirder and weirder when they reach the boyfriend's family farm. Nothing appears to be as it seems...However, while this constant shifting did frequently throw me off somewhat, it was more like an enjoyable puzzle.

In any case I didn't think it was really all that difficult to follow once I grasped the main contours of Kaufman was getting at. To me it was fundamentally about the ravages of time and the unreliability of memory. The film simply struck me as an exploration of this general theme and the surreal, postmodern aspects of its style essentially an outward manifestation of internal memory loss - presumably connected with dementia, alzheimers and so on. Connected to this it also seemed very much concerned with the things which make up the self, particularly the self we wish to portray to others - on some level we internalise our interests, the authors we like and so on, quoting from them as if we had written them ourselves. We are the books we read, and at least in some regard reflect how we want others to perceive us. This idea comes through quite strongly in the various conversations the characters have about the art, films, philosophy, and so on. Of course, the self is also built up by our past experiences and relationships, whether with our parents or others.

Trying to not delve into any specific spoiler talk either, but it's not to say I understood every single thing about the film. It clearly revels in ambiguity to a certain extent and opens itself up to more specific interpretations - there is a lot to unpack no doubt - but in broad stroke terms the ideas are relatively clear. All in all I thought it was a very enjoyable, intriguing experience watching it.

Best review I've read of that film. Others had put me off, think Ill give it a try now.
 
Reactions: Matty lll

AntG

Scaredy Bat
Nov 16, 2012
3,743
2,912
Lancashire
2 very different war films based around true battles

We Were Soldiers

Mel Gibson leads his air cavalry into a battle in Vietnam which turns into a savage 3 day firefight as they find themselves surrounded and outnumbered by their enemy, fantastic battle scenes but overdoes the sentimentality, still a good watch though.


Lone Survivor

Mark Wahlberg is part of a 4 man Navy SEAL team on a recon mission in Afghanistan but they become compromised and end up in a battle with hundreds of heavily armed militia. Too much shaky cam and way too much Hollywood in this film, average with a few good moments, that scene where they're falling down the mountain looks horrific, sat on the couch and I'm wincing at that one.
 
Reactions: Sittin Sonny

Sittin Sonny

The Antifa Shuffle
Jun 10, 2013
6,256
5,511
Blade Runner 2049

Good film but not a patch on the original and way too long, too many spells of nothing happening.
So much style over substance, really laughable on second viewing.
I felt it was trying too hard to imitate the visual style of the original, plus Jared Leto as a stereotypically weird and pretentious villain felt unnecessary and out of place.
 
Reactions: NSFW

BigBone

Sugalowda!
Jun 13, 2012
12,998
2,890
Tycho Station
Psycho (1960) - 4K uncut restoration

Seen many classics in theaters in my time but never Psycho on the big one, best I think was some regular HQ version 15 years back, yet always thought this was Hitchcock's Thing moment, his masterwork. And boy does it look spectacular in 4K! Hard to pin-point the best thing about the greatest classic Hollywood movie of all time since it starts with Saul Bass' legendary title sequence with Bernard Herrmann's sharp, eerie music, followed by John L. Russell's crystal clear establishing shot and Joseph Stefano's dialogue. Hitchcock was truly the master of suspense: never a dull or comfortable moment from the moment girl has intimate relations with boy in hotel room, and putting an amoral female character in the lead - a criminal in fact - was only the beginning of breaking tradition.

The mid-movie shocker must've scared audience shitless as it's still terrifying 60 years and many viewers later, and everything looks mighty in black and white 4K resolution, a revelation since there's neither noise filtering nor oversharpening, image is incredibly healthy. Sound design is up there too, but in the end it's still Anthony Perkins' movie. His sickly body and nervous energy around Janet Leigh is disturbing on A-side meth, fella looks every bit the creep he's portraying. Leigh's paranoia, Balsam's savvy private eye in for a rude awakening and just about everything is perfect 10/10, although I couldn't figure why this version is called uncut, since I didn't recognize anything different. Anyways: Psycho never looked or sounded better, and its quite sad this pulp movie / slasher flopped, cause Hitch never followed it up with such an experiment in film language. Still the crown jewel in an epic career, Psyco is simply PERFECTION.













 

NSFW

Freedom Fighter
May 14, 2013
23,796
12,589
Castle Duckula.
Ad Astra

An incredibly boring attempt at Apocalypse Now. Jeez this was boring and bland. I only made it half way through. Brad Pitt falls to sleep then reads a few lines, apparently his heart rate doesn't go above 80 something which makes sense because you feel like slipping into a coma watching this. An action scene involving dune buggies and shooting pistols at each other is a laughable attempt at action and totally retarded. Old people act in this too, they probably didn't realise they'd been in the film. It looks nice though and sounds alright, but do not watch this under any circumstance.

2/10 point for Pitt an one for how it looked, it even looked boring. Look how bored Pitt is here.

 
Reactions: Hookjaw and BigBone
Mar 31, 2017
895
1,046
46
I'm Thinking of Ending Things (2020)


Liked this a lot actually. Have never even seen any of Kaufman's famous work like Synecdoche, New York (2008) but I found this one very engaging. Obviously very much falling into a general postmodern, absurdist kind of tone.

For a film ostensibly about a failing relationship it's not so much propelled by the drama between the characters as by the sheer strangeness of their interactions. Even from the start things seem a little off between the couple and they only get weirder and weirder when they reach the boyfriend's family farm. Nothing appears to be as it seems...However, while this constant shifting did frequently throw me off somewhat, it was more like an enjoyable puzzle.

In any case I didn't think it was really all that difficult to follow once I grasped the main contours of Kaufman was getting at. To me it was fundamentally about the ravages of time and the unreliability of memory. The film simply struck me as an exploration of this general theme and the surreal, postmodern aspects of its style essentially an outward manifestation of internal memory loss - presumably connected with dementia, alzheimers and so on. Connected to this it also seemed very much concerned with the things which make up the self, particularly the self we wish to portray to others - on some level we internalise our interests, the authors we like and so on, quoting from them as if we had written them ourselves. We are the books we read, and at least in some regard reflect how we want others to perceive us. This idea comes through quite strongly in the various conversations the characters have about the art, films, philosophy, and so on. Of course, the self is also built up by our past experiences and relationships, whether with our parents or others.

Trying to not delve into any specific spoiler talk either, but it's not to say I understood every single thing about the film. It clearly revels in ambiguity to a certain extent and opens itself up to more specific interpretations - there is a lot to unpack no doubt - but in broad stroke terms the ideas are relatively clear. All in all I thought it was a very enjoyable, intriguing experience watching it.
Gave this a watch tonight. I've missed the last couple of Kaufman's works, but of the five he wrote prior - though crucially did not direct - I have watched and enjoyed four of them. I particularly liked Adaptation and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, the latter in particular staying with me long after watching it. Confessions of a Dangerous Mind was very good also, although possibly the most superficially entertaining of the four. Being John Malkovich was a fun idea, but a bit too gimmicky for my tastes.

Anyway, I'd been looking forward to watching this, and began with high hopes. The two leads are both excellent throughout, and I had to stop the film early on to check the actress's name (Jessie Buckley) as I recognised her lop-sided grin without, rather naggingly, being able to place her... Ah, the lass from Taboo - itch duly scratched, I was free to continue.

The dynamic established between the pair on their initial road trip is a relatively conventional one - it is the early stages of their romantic relationship, and he seems eager to please, while she has near enough one foot out the door already. Thereafter, it is almost as if the events unfolding are intended to give her something to cry about, so to speak.

As previously remarked, I too missed Synecdoche, New York, but having read some of the reviews I might have known what to brace myself for. It's not that the ideas being examined in those earlier movies were not every bit as complex as those alluded to in this one, but the filter of various different directors apparently softened some of Kaufman's edges, providing what I would contend were more entertaining - and certainly much more watchable - efforts. And it's not that I didn't enjoy the movie - there were remarkable, surprising moments sprinkled throughout, and I particularly liked some of the interplay between Buckley and Plemmons. But I wasn't especially moved by any of it, and I didn't particularly feel anything for any of the characters involved. And when the whole thing finally drifted to a halt I must confess, I was rather glad it was all over.

I think it's fair to say, I don't mind the occasional post-modern flourish in my movies, but I generally need a fair old bit of sugar to help the bugger go down.
 
Reactions: Matty lll
May 16, 2013
8,709
7,271
I'm Thinking of Ending Things (2020)


Liked this a lot actually. Have never even seen any of Kaufman's famous work like Synecdoche, New York (2008) but I found this one very engaging. Obviously very much falling into a general postmodern, absurdist kind of tone.

For a film ostensibly about a failing relationship it's not so much propelled by the drama between the characters as by the sheer strangeness of their interactions. Even from the start things seem a little off between the couple and they only get weirder and weirder when they reach the boyfriend's family farm. Nothing appears to be as it seems...However, while this constant shifting did frequently throw me off somewhat, it was more like an enjoyable puzzle.

In any case I didn't think it was really all that difficult to follow once I grasped the main contours of Kaufman was getting at. To me it was fundamentally about the ravages of time and the unreliability of memory. The film simply struck me as an exploration of this general theme and the surreal, postmodern aspects of its style essentially an outward manifestation of internal memory loss - presumably connected with dementia, alzheimers and so on. Connected to this it also seemed very much concerned with the things which make up the self, particularly the self we wish to portray to others - on some level we internalise our interests, the authors we like and so on, quoting from them as if we had written them ourselves. We are the books we read, and at least in some regard reflect how we want others to perceive us. This idea comes through quite strongly in the various conversations the characters have about the art, films, philosophy, and so on. Of course, the self is also built up by our past experiences and relationships, whether with our parents or others.

Trying to not delve into any specific spoiler talk either, but it's not to say I understood every single thing about the film. It clearly revels in ambiguity to a certain extent and opens itself up to more specific interpretations - there is a lot to unpack no doubt - but in broad stroke terms the ideas are relatively clear. All in all I thought it was a very enjoyable, intriguing experience watching it.
Whatever, did you see her tits?
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Sittin Sonny
Jul 6, 2019
6,948
7,285
Gave this a watch tonight. I've missed the last couple of Kaufman's works, but of the five he wrote prior - though crucially did not direct - I have watched and enjoyed four of them. I particularly liked Adaptation and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, the latter in particular staying with me long after watching it. Confessions of a Dangerous Mind was very good also, although possibly the most superficially entertaining of the four. Being John Malkovich was a fun idea, but a bit too gimmicky for my tastes.

Anyway, I'd been looking forward to watching this, and began with high hopes. The two leads are both excellent throughout, and I had to stop the film early on to check the actress's name (Jessie Buckley) as I recognised her lop-sided grin without, rather naggingly, being able to place her... Ah, the lass from Taboo - itch duly scratched, I was free to continue.

The dynamic established between the pair on their initial road trip is a relatively conventional one - it is the early stages of their romantic relationship, and he seems eager to please, while she has near enough one foot out the door already. Thereafter, it is almost as if the events unfolding are intended to give her something to cry about, so to speak.

As previously remarked, I too missed Synecdoche, New York, but having read some of the reviews I might have known what to brace myself for. It's not that the ideas being examined in those earlier movies were not every bit as complex as those alluded to in this one, but the filter of various different directors apparently softened some of Kaufman's edges, providing what I would contend were more entertaining - and certainly much more watchable - efforts. And it's not that I didn't enjoy the movie - there were remarkable, surprising moments sprinkled throughout, and I particularly liked some of the interplay between Buckley and Plemmons. But I wasn't especially moved by any of it, and I didn't particularly feel anything for any of the characters involved. And when the whole thing finally drifted to a halt I must confess, I was rather glad it was all over.

I think it's fair to say, I don't mind the occasional post-modern flourish in my movies, but I generally need a fair old bit of sugar to help the bugger go down.
I find I have less appetite or endurance for surrealism, magical realism, or other types fantastical elements in dramas these days. In movies or literature.

They have to be great for me to make the effort, and even then I often prefer something more straight forward.
 
Reactions: Hookjaw