Rate The Last Film You Watched

Mar 31, 2017
1,084
1,333
46
scarface.

some people here aint big fans. i don't get that.

pacino's performance alone deserves 9/10. a lot of the meat is in short scenes without the memorable/quotable lines. plus i forgot how hot the sister is, fro n all.
Truly love the 80's Scarface. Seems to be a lot of people peering down their nose at it these days, but for me that's a bona fide classic right there. Great central performances, absorbing plot, cracking soundtrack and memorable dialogue and characterization.

I first watched it as a wide-eyed ten year old. My dear old mum had asked the - clearly disturbed - video shop clerk for an appropriate selection for family viewing, along the lines of a gripping courtroom drama... His recommendation - Scarface, madam. Within thirty minutes, that chainsaw scene had rendered us all pretty much mute, and I'm amazed we made it as far as the scene where Manny demonstrates cunnilingus.

It was some years before I got to see the rest. Tony's monologue in the restaurant, the assassination attempt in the nightclub, and of course that magnificent finale... All were well worth the wait.

I understand the Coen brothers are in negotiations to produce an updated version of it, which has been in the works for years, and if they did end up doing it, I'd have high hopes - even a half-arsed re-make along the lines of The Ladykillers would be well worth a look. But, in my opinion, the Coens have been treading water since the turn of the century (True Grit perhaps aside) so this would really be their chance to turn that oil tanker around. I live in hope...
 
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FemdomFilmFan

Mistress Catherine's slave
Oct 1, 2020
210
82
39
Dublin, Ireland
Truly love the 80's Scarface. Seems to be a lot of people peering down their nose at it these days, but for me that's a bona fide classic right there. Great central performances, absorbing plot, cracking soundtrack and memorable dialogue and characterization.

I first watched it as a wide-eyed ten year old. My dear old mum had asked the - clearly disturbed - video shop clerk for an appropriate selection for family viewing, along the lines of a gripping courtroom drama... His recommendation - Scarface, madam. Within thirty minutes, that chainsaw scene had rendered us all pretty much mute, and I'm amazed we made it as far as the scene where Manny demonstrates cunnilingus.

It was some years before I got to see the rest. Tony's monologue in the restaurant, the assassination attempt in the nightclub, and of course that magnificent finale... All were well worth the wait.

I understand the Coen brothers are in negotiations to produce an updated version of it, which has been in the works for years, and if they did end up doing it, I'd have high hopes - even a half-arsed re-make along the lines of The Ladykillers would be well worth a look. But, in my opinion, the Coens have been treading water since the turn of the century (True Grit perhaps aside) so this would really be their chance to turn that oil tanker around. I live in hope...
Why can I not instantly remember that?
 

kf3

Jul 17, 2012
7,415
4,136
South London
Truly love the 80's Scarface. Seems to be a lot of people peering down their nose at it these days, but for me that's a bona fide classic right there. Great central performances, absorbing plot, cracking soundtrack and memorable dialogue and characterization.

I first watched it as a wide-eyed ten year old. My dear old mum had asked the - clearly disturbed - video shop clerk for an appropriate selection for family viewing, along the lines of a gripping courtroom drama... His recommendation - Scarface, madam. Within thirty minutes, that chainsaw scene had rendered us all pretty much mute, and I'm amazed we made it as far as the scene where Manny demonstrates cunnilingus.

It was some years before I got to see the rest. Tony's monologue in the restaurant, the assassination attempt in the nightclub, and of course that magnificent finale... All were well worth the wait.

I understand the Coen brothers are in negotiations to produce an updated version of it, which has been in the works for years, and if they did end up doing it, I'd have high hopes - even a half-arsed re-make along the lines of The Ladykillers would be well worth a look. But, in my opinion, the Coens have been treading water since the turn of the century (True Grit perhaps aside) so this would really be their chance to turn that oil tanker around. I live in hope...
it's obviously not high art, but it's better in almost every way.

i'll always give the cohen's a chance but i'm not sure about 2020 scarface. if it's just a different film fair enough but if they wanna make a close version it'd prob have to be about a mexican, and that film's been made a bunch of times already(just not called scarface, now that i wrote that it sounds like a cash in).
 
Mar 31, 2017
1,084
1,333
46
it's obviously not high art, but it's better in almost every way.

i'll always give the cohen's a chance but i'm not sure about 2020 scarface. if it's just a different film fair enough but if they wanna make a close version it'd prob have to be about a mexican, and that film's been made a bunch of times already(just not called scarface, now that i wrote that it sounds like a cash in).
Just checked - Coens wrote the script - yeah, I'm buzzed.
 

AntG

Scaredy Bat
Nov 16, 2012
3,856
3,026
Lancashire
2 films which I'd never seen before and actually surprised me

The Cabin in the Woods

I was expecting some Evil Dead style clone which of of course it does owe a lot too but it has a neat little side story of the events being manipulated for a bigger reason, I actually really enjoyed it.


Bronson

Again I was expecting one of those "Rise of the Footsoldier" type films full of stereotypical cockney hardmen but I thought Tom Hardy was great and thought it was a really solid and quite funny film. I don't know how much of it is true like.
 
Reactions: Sittin Sonny

AntG

Scaredy Bat
Nov 16, 2012
3,856
3,026
Lancashire
scarface.

some people here aint big fans. i don't get that.

pacino's performance alone deserves 9/10. a lot of the meat is in short scenes without the memorable/quotable lines. plus i forgot how hot the sister is, fro n all.
I saw it a couple of times as a young lad and did kind of enjoy it mainly because it clearly had a lot of influence on GTA: Vice City which is one of my all time favourite video games and I think the soundtrack was in GTA3 but having revisited the film within the last year I really wasn't impressed. It's biggest issue is it's length, it's roughly the same length as The Godfather but feels about an hour longer, you could probably knock 45 minutes off it's running time and it would instantly be a better film for it.

I do prefer the 1932 version, I'm not saying it's without it's flaws(for one it hasn't aged particularly well at all) but it is essentially the same story told in just over half the time. It's all about taste at the end of the day though, people can prefer what they want but for me the Pacino film isn't anywhere near a classic, in fact I wouldn't even have it a Pacino top 10 but I ain't the oracle of films and as they say about opinions being like arseholes...
 
Reactions: kf3 and Bob Weaver
May 25, 2013
8,107
4,796
2 films which I'd never seen before and actually surprised me

The Cabin in the Woods

I was expecting some Evil Dead style clone which of of course it does owe a lot too but it has a neat little side story of the events being manipulated for a bigger reason, I actually really enjoyed it.


Bronson

Again I was expecting one of those "Rise of the Footsoldier" type films full of stereotypical cockney hardmen but I thought Tom Hardy was great and thought it was a really solid and quite funny film. I don't know how much of it is true like.
Yeah I really enjoyed The Cabin in the Woods, a nice twist on a well known story we've all seen before. Being a Whedon produced film you can see his influence throughout the film from the dialogue to the casting choices.

This film also helped Chris Hemsworth secure the role for Thor as it was Whedon who called Branagh and vouched for him which seemed to put Hemsworth back in the running for the role.
 
Jul 29, 2012
18,831
4,036
Belfast, Ireland
Barry Lyndon (1975)
[IMG]


Rewatched this masterpiece last night. Having just spent the weekend in Vienna wandering through museums, art galleries, ornate rooms and generally living a luxurious existence I was very much in the mood to show this film to my gf.

Perhaps the most impressive thing of all is that Kubrick has managed to craft one of the finest historical films of all time with what is surely one of the worst Irish accents ever put to screen...However, Ryan O'Neals bizarre accent does, in a roundabout way, point to one of Barry Lyndon's most impressive qualities. It's a truly awful Irish accent, but one reason it sticks out so obviously is that in typical Kubrickian style, everything else in the film is recreated with such obsessive, meticulous detail. Everything from the settings, interiors and costumes to the portrayal of societal norms brings the world of the 18th century aristocracy to life so vividly that it’s as if Kubrick had brought us back there in a time machine.

On my first watch a few years ago this was the quality which was most obviously apparent. The cinematography and visual composition is just on another level. As is well-known by now Kubrick even used state-of-the-art camera lenses designed for NASA so that he could capture interior scenes, lit only by candlelight. They look incredible, but the outdoor shots look immaculately framed as well. You can almost take a scene at random and it would compare favourably to paintings of the era. Of course this was a deliberate effect.

On my second watch this visual richness is every bit as prominent, but I found that I also appreciated the subtlety of Kubrick’s characters a hell of a lot more the second time around. On the first watch I enjoyed the plot as well of course. It’s an excellent tale of a stereotypical “Irish rogue” (Ryan O’Neals accent excused of course) dueling, lying, gambling and cheating his way to the very top of European society. From rural Ireland to the parlours and games rooms of fine society back again. It’s a wonderfully scathing portrait of the empty, vapid, world of appearances that is the 18th century aristocracy. A world that will soon vanish as time marches on into the 19th century.

However, this time round though I began to appreciate some of the subtleties of motivations and emotions of the various characters much more. This is frequently masked by the decorum required by high society, where everything must be subdued to preserve the outward appearance of genteel respectability. Underneath this surface of polite civility and carefully chosen words (though the mask might slip at a few points) there is a lot more to be read. I would definitely rank this as one of Kubrick’s absolute best.
 

BigBone

Sugalowda!
Jun 13, 2012
13,430
3,084
Tycho Station
Barry Lyndon (1975)
[IMG]


Rewatched this masterpiece last night. Having just spent the weekend in Vienna wandering through museums, art galleries, ornate rooms and generally living a luxurious existence I was very much in the mood to show this film to my gf.

Perhaps the most impressive thing of all is that Kubrick has managed to craft one of the finest historical films of all time with what is surely one of the worst Irish accents ever put to screen...However, Ryan O'Neals bizarre accent does, in a roundabout way, point to one of Barry Lyndon's most impressive qualities. It's a truly awful Irish accent, but one reason it sticks out so obviously is that in typical Kubrickian style, everything else in the film is recreated with such obsessive, meticulous detail. Everything from the settings, interiors and costumes to the portrayal of societal norms brings the world of the 18th century aristocracy to life so vividly that it’s as if Kubrick had brought us back there in a time machine.

On my first watch a few years ago this was the quality which was most obviously apparent. The cinematography and visual composition is just on another level. As is well-known by now Kubrick even used state-of-the-art camera lenses designed for NASA so that he could capture interior scenes, lit only by candlelight. They look incredible, but the outdoor shots look immaculately framed as well. You can almost take a scene at random and it would compare favourably to paintings of the era. Of course this was a deliberate effect.

On my second watch this visual richness is every bit as prominent, but I found that I also appreciated the subtlety of Kubrick’s characters a hell of a lot more the second time around. On the first watch I enjoyed the plot as well of course. It’s an excellent tale of a stereotypical “Irish rogue” (Ryan O’Neals accent excused of course) dueling, lying, gambling and cheating his way to the very top of European society. From rural Ireland to the parlours and games rooms of fine society back again. It’s a wonderfully scathing portrait of the empty, vapid, world of appearances that is the 18th century aristocracy. A world that will soon vanish as time marches on into the 19th century.

However, this time round though I began to appreciate some of the subtleties of motivations and emotions of the various characters much more. This is frequently masked by the decorum required by high society, where everything must be subdued to preserve the outward appearance of genteel respectability. Underneath this surface of polite civility and carefully chosen words (though the mask might slip at a few points) there is a lot more to be read. I would definitely rank this as one of Kubrick’s absolute best.
I've been putting this watch on hold due to the sheer runtime even though I dig long flicks (well, still haven't seen the supposedly taste-changing Satantango at 7,5hrs, have you? :lol: ) but I have the HD copy and u Kubrick can't go wrong with Kubrick... well I do know I haven't liked Clockwork Orange as a teen but that was many years ago... otherwise and besides this one, I think I like them all.

But for today I'm planning one of the Ds: The Damned Don't Cry (1950), The Driller Killer (1979) or The Draughtman's Contract (1982).
 
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Sittin Sonny

The Antifa Shuffle
Jun 10, 2013
6,819
5,969
Barry Lyndon (1975)
[IMG]


Rewatched this masterpiece last night. Having just spent the weekend in Vienna wandering through museums, art galleries, ornate rooms and generally living a luxurious existence I was very much in the mood to show this film to my gf.

Perhaps the most impressive thing of all is that Kubrick has managed to craft one of the finest historical films of all time with what is surely one of the worst Irish accents ever put to screen...However, Ryan O'Neals bizarre accent does, in a roundabout way, point to one of Barry Lyndon's most impressive qualities. It's a truly awful Irish accent, but one reason it sticks out so obviously is that in typical Kubrickian style, everything else in the film is recreated with such obsessive, meticulous detail. Everything from the settings, interiors and costumes to the portrayal of societal norms brings the world of the 18th century aristocracy to life so vividly that it’s as if Kubrick had brought us back there in a time machine.

On my first watch a few years ago this was the quality which was most obviously apparent. The cinematography and visual composition is just on another level. As is well-known by now Kubrick even used state-of-the-art camera lenses designed for NASA so that he could capture interior scenes, lit only by candlelight. They look incredible, but the outdoor shots look immaculately framed as well. You can almost take a scene at random and it would compare favourably to paintings of the era. Of course this was a deliberate effect.

On my second watch this visual richness is every bit as prominent, but I found that I also appreciated the subtlety of Kubrick’s characters a hell of a lot more the second time around. On the first watch I enjoyed the plot as well of course. It’s an excellent tale of a stereotypical “Irish rogue” (Ryan O’Neals accent excused of course) dueling, lying, gambling and cheating his way to the very top of European society. From rural Ireland to the parlours and games rooms of fine society back again. It’s a wonderfully scathing portrait of the empty, vapid, world of appearances that is the 18th century aristocracy. A world that will soon vanish as time marches on into the 19th century.

However, this time round though I began to appreciate some of the subtleties of motivations and emotions of the various characters much more. This is frequently masked by the decorum required by high society, where everything must be subdued to preserve the outward appearance of genteel respectability. Underneath this surface of polite civility and carefully chosen words (though the mask might slip at a few points) there is a lot more to be read. I would definitely rank this as one of Kubrick’s absolute best.

I've always thought this was Kubrick's finest film. Oddly enough, it was his lone commercial failure during his glory years.
 
Jul 6, 2019
7,883
8,270
Barry Lyndon (1975)
[IMG]


Rewatched this masterpiece last night. Having just spent the weekend in Vienna wandering through museums, art galleries, ornate rooms and generally living a luxurious existence I was very much in the mood to show this film to my gf.

Perhaps the most impressive thing of all is that Kubrick has managed to craft one of the finest historical films of all time with what is surely one of the worst Irish accents ever put to screen...However, Ryan O'Neals bizarre accent does, in a roundabout way, point to one of Barry Lyndon's most impressive qualities. It's a truly awful Irish accent, but one reason it sticks out so obviously is that in typical Kubrickian style, everything else in the film is recreated with such obsessive, meticulous detail. Everything from the settings, interiors and costumes to the portrayal of societal norms brings the world of the 18th century aristocracy to life so vividly that it’s as if Kubrick had brought us back there in a time machine.

On my first watch a few years ago this was the quality which was most obviously apparent. The cinematography and visual composition is just on another level. As is well-known by now Kubrick even used state-of-the-art camera lenses designed for NASA so that he could capture interior scenes, lit only by candlelight. They look incredible, but the outdoor shots look immaculately framed as well. You can almost take a scene at random and it would compare favourably to paintings of the era. Of course this was a deliberate effect.

On my second watch this visual richness is every bit as prominent, but I found that I also appreciated the subtlety of Kubrick’s characters a hell of a lot more the second time around. On the first watch I enjoyed the plot as well of course. It’s an excellent tale of a stereotypical “Irish rogue” (Ryan O’Neals accent excused of course) dueling, lying, gambling and cheating his way to the very top of European society. From rural Ireland to the parlours and games rooms of fine society back again. It’s a wonderfully scathing portrait of the empty, vapid, world of appearances that is the 18th century aristocracy. A world that will soon vanish as time marches on into the 19th century.

However, this time round though I began to appreciate some of the subtleties of motivations and emotions of the various characters much more. This is frequently masked by the decorum required by high society, where everything must be subdued to preserve the outward appearance of genteel respectability. Underneath this surface of polite civility and carefully chosen words (though the mask might slip at a few points) there is a lot more to be read. I would definitely rank this as one of Kubrick’s absolute best.
Great film, great review, and I'm jealous you've been in Vienna. Lovely city.
 
Reactions: Matty lll

AntG

Scaredy Bat
Nov 16, 2012
3,856
3,026
Lancashire
Last night we watched Legally Blonde which I'm not going to lie, I actually enjoyed, then we watched The Usual Suspects which is a film I've always loved.
 
Reactions: NSFW