That time of year once again

Deebo

"Messkin" Deebo
Jun 5, 2013
15,388
11,261
Show dem balls bro
To tell you the truth I've only done it once, came out pretty good, but I'm actually a Reynold's oven bag turkey guy myself. I just can't seem to ever go wrong with the oven bag style, always comes out great, the clean-up is easy as hell and it's one of those set it and forget it deals.
 
May 17, 2013
9,860
7,768
Louisiana
I'm not sure if I'm cooking it wrong Deebo, but my turkey roast always comes out dry. I always do it in the oven. Any tips?

@gumbo2176

You can brine the turkey for a day or more in a liquid brine or inject it the night before with a seasoned blend to add more juice to the meat.

I've done both and it is far easier to inject the turkey the night before and I make my own injection liquid using the following:

For one turkey 15-18 lbs.

1 stick real butter-----fuck margarine
1 cup water
3 cloves garlic minced fine
2 green onions chopped fine
3-4 sprigs parsley chopped fine
2 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
Salt and black pepper to taste

Put all ingredients in a sauce pan and bring to a boil and let this cook for 15-20 minutes so all the flavors are incorporated. Strain out the solids and allow the liquid to cool to room temperature. Do not use hot liquid to inject the turkey.

Use an injector for injecting food products and make sure to mix the liquid since the butter will want to rise to the top of the container. An emersion blender really helps mix it well or just use a wire whisk. Draw the liquid into the injector and insert the needle in one side of the breast meat and angle the needle to the neck of the turkey and inject some liquid. Then refill the injector and use the same hole and inject liquid in the lower portion of the same breast.

Do this to both breasts, legs and thighs. No need to try to inject the wings since there is so little meat there to begin with.

When I bake/roast a turkey I put it in the oven covered to hold moisture in the roasting pan and will uncover it the last hour or so to brown the outside for that nice medium brown color I like.
 

Deebo

"Messkin" Deebo
Jun 5, 2013
15,388
11,261
Show dem balls bro
You can brine the turkey for a day or more in a liquid brine or inject it the night before with a seasoned blend to add more juice to the meat.

I've done both and it is far easier to inject the turkey the night before and I make my own injection liquid using the following:

For one turkey 15-18 lbs.

1 stick real butter-----fuck margarine
1 cup water
3 cloves garlic minced fine
2 green onions chopped fine
3-4 sprigs parsley chopped fine
2 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
Salt and black pepper to taste

Put all ingredients in a sauce pan and bring to a boil and let this cook for 15-20 minutes so all the flavors are incorporated. Strain out the solids and allow the liquid to cool to room temperature. Do not use hot liquid to inject the turkey.

Use an injector for injecting food products and make sure to mix the liquid since the butter will want to rise to the top of the container. An emersion blender really helps mix it well or just use a wire whisk. Draw the liquid into the injector and insert the needle in one side of the breast meat and angle the needle to the neck of the turkey and inject some liquid. Then refill the injector and use the same hole and inject liquid in the lower portion of the same breast.

Do this to both breasts, legs and thighs. No need to try to inject the wings since there is so little meat there to begin with.

When I bake/roast a turkey I put it in the oven covered to hold moisture in the roasting pan and will uncover it the last hour or so to brown the outside for that nice medium brown color I like.

Nice.

I brined a turkey once with leftover corned beef broth from the day before. It was....interesting to say the least. But it wasn't bad at all. More salty if anything.
 
May 17, 2013
9,860
7,768
Louisiana
Nice.

I brined a turkey once with leftover corned beef broth from the day before. It was....interesting to say the least. But it wasn't bad at all. More salty if anything.
I also make my own corned beef and pastrami out of large beef briskets I get from Costco and you're right, a corned beef brine is very salty and not one I'd use for brining a turkey.

This is my brine recipe:

Zest of 3 oranges
3 cups apple cider vinegar
2 gallons of water
1 1/2 cups salt
2 cups brown sugar
4-5 bay leaves
4 tbsp. fresh rosemary
5 cloves minced garlic
3 tbsp. peppercorns

Put this in a pot and bring to a boil and let it cook for 30 minutes. Cut off the fire and allow to come to room temperature. I have food safe plastic containers large enough to brine a 20 lb. turkey and I'll put the brine in the container then put the turkey in to completely cover it an put it back in the fridge for at least 24 hours.

Prior to cooking, I'll remove it from the brine and rinse the turkey off, wipe it dry or all water, then rub the skin with olive oil and season the outside with a seasoned salt blend, some black pepper and garlic powder prior to baking.
 
Reactions: Trail and REDC

REDC

Amateuristic professional
Dec 12, 2015
2,184
655
Gumbo what's your take on boiling/cooking a turkey (or chicken for that matter) first and then fry it after but much shorter?
 
May 22, 2013
3,181
1,587
Australia
Good thinking, will do.
I for one would like to see the process and results of a beer can turkey.
Me too!
I’m not the biggest fan of turkey. It’s always been dry and tasteless when I’ve had it. but am keen to hear how a beer can one would turn out. Same for deep fried turkey

I’ve done a few beer can chickens lately and they’ve mostly turned out heaps good!

I’ve got one of them stands to hold the chook up that also holds a regular beer can. Usally I just get whatever random pre mixed spices they have at the markets, mix that with a bit of olive oil and coat the chook all over and as much inside as I can. Crack a beer can put it over and wack it all in the oven.

I’ve found that While the oven can be too low you can’t really have it to hot. The beer will stop it from drying out. It’s just a case of how much you want to cook the outside skin.
For me the sweet spot is about 180-190 degrees Celsius for between and 1 and 1.5 hours. Anything lower I find the beer doesn’t boil and steam as much as I’d like.

let us know how it turns out if you do the turkey!!
Also apparently you can do Coca Cola chicken. Though that sounds gross
 

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
35,752
12,687
I’ve done a few beer can chickens lately and they’ve mostly turned out heaps good!
:lol:

I literally get physically threatened if not attacked by my mates if I use the phrase "heaps good" to describe anything. Apparently that is the worst Aussieism. :lol:

Also apparently you can do Coca Cola chicken. Though that sounds gross
I sometimes use Coca-Cola or Royal Crown Draft with pork or ham. Turns out better than it sounds. It just gives it a sticky caramel-type glaze.

:hat
 

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
35,752
12,687
My party, so I pay for all the food, drinks, peanut oil needed for frying the birds, etc.

I spend about $400 every year to throw this party, so it's not bad in my opinion. I had 25 guests last year and had enough food to feed at least 10 more people.


I'm a firm believer in not running out of food when I have guest over to eat. Nothing goes to waste between a few to-go plates and eating it over then next few days.
That's a pretty good price for the return,i must admit.

I would have everybody throw in $10 and bring either booze or some weed, though. Fucked if I'm doing all that for everybody and then find myself drinking my own grog and smoking my own weed. :yep

:hat
 

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
35,752
12,687
I'm culturally appropriating like a muthafucka.

Doing it right too!!!!


If I could, I would revoke your residency for that shit. I'm sending some emails from a police account anyway, just on the off chance. :bart

:hat
 
Reactions: mandela
May 17, 2013
9,860
7,768
Louisiana
Gumbo what's your take on boiling/cooking a turkey (or chicken for that matter) first and then fry it after but much shorter?
Not no, but HELL NO. The only time I put a bird in the water to cook is when making gumbo or some type soup. I see no point in boiling it and rendering fat out of the skin and flavor out of the meat, then frying it. To me, that would kind of defeat the purpose by removing flavor from the bird from the start.
 

Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
31,080
7,182
Not no, but HELL NO. The only time I put a bird in the water to cook is when making gumbo or some type soup. I see no point in boiling it and rendering fat out of the skin and flavor out of the meat, then frying it. To me, that would kind of defeat the purpose by removing flavor from the bird from the start.
Gumbo, can you slow cook a turkey (in a slow cooker obviously)?
 
May 17, 2013
9,860
7,768
Louisiana
Gumbo, can you slow cook a turkey (in a slow cooker obviously)?
The closest I've come to slow cooking is when I smoke them and keep my temperature around 250 degrees F. I'll brine the turkey using the brine recipe I posted earlier in this thread and do that for no less than 24 hours. I'll get my smoker up to temperature and lay in some hickory or pecan wood chunks and when I get a good smoke going, I'll put the bird in the smoker. I have 2 smokers and the one I use for a single bird is one of those bullet looking type with 2 racks above a water pan and below the water pan is the coal/wood tray.

Depending on the size of the turkey, it could be anywhere from 3-5 hours in the smoker.

I have a couple electric crock pots, but they are not near big enough for a turkey, but I do have a large Nesco that can be used as a roaster that will hold up to about a 20 lb. turkey, but I've never given that way of cooking it any real thought.
 
Reactions: Trail

REDC

Amateuristic professional
Dec 12, 2015
2,184
655
Not no, but HELL NO. The only time I put a bird in the water to cook is when making gumbo or some type soup. I see no point in boiling it and rendering fat out of the skin and flavor out of the meat, then frying it. To me, that would kind of defeat the purpose by removing flavor from the bird from the start.
Noted!
 

Ronsonfly

Toxic White Male
May 8, 2013
7,723
10,441
In a deplorable basket
Gumbo, can you slow cook a turkey (in a slow cooker obviously)?
:lol: Where are you going to find a slow cooker big enough for a turkey? If you don't have something for commercial/industrial use you'll be chopping the fucker up to get it in a domestic slow cooker.

In terms of principle, yes you can slow cook one if you have a big enough cooking space. A mate's old man used to do their Xmas bird overnight in their Aga on a really low setting. Apparently it was terrific.
 
Reactions: Trail

Trail

R.I.P. Joe Rein
May 24, 2013
31,080
7,182
:lol: Where are you going to find a slow cooker big enough for a turkey? If you don't have something for commercial/industrial use you'll be chopping the fucker up to get it in a domestic slow cooker.

In terms of principle, yes you can slow cook one if you have a big enough cooking space. A mate's old man used to do their Xmas bird overnight in their Aga on a really low setting. Apparently it was terrific.
I live on my own so I'm not likely to be cooking a full turkey. Maybe half or a couple of turkey breasts?