The Asian Boxing Thread!

Jun 3, 2012
11,049
10,871
Korakuen Hall
Branching from my Japanese boxing thread on ESB, I thought I'd start one one here including the whole of Asia, as this forum is still in its infancy.

This thread is for discussing anything about the past, present and future of Asian boxing :good
 
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Jun 4, 2012
23,533
6,803
England
:happy

Uchiyama is one of my favorite fighters, It's sad to see him defending against Farenas next month :-( Especially after his good performance against Solis.

Only 2 weeks until Ioka begins his assault on unifying the Straw weight titles :ibutt
 
Jun 4, 2012
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Lancashire
I enjoy keeping an eye on the Asian boxing scene, but I must confess whenever I do its via youtube, usually weeks/months after the fights take place. I'm always playing catch up, and I'd really like to delve a bit deeper into the scene over there and become a bit more knowledgeable. So my question to the hardcore followers of the Asian scene is what method do you use to watch these fights live? As I never really see any Western TV interest in even the big world title fights unless they involve an American (which I think is a massive shame). Are they on a specialist channel? Or does it involve illegal methods that I would NEVER use and NEVER want to accidently stumble upon ten minutes before a decent card is about to start.
 
Jun 3, 2012
11,049
10,871
Korakuen Hall
I enjoy keeping an eye on the Asian boxing scene, but I must confess whenever I do its via youtube, usually weeks/months after the fights take place. I'm always playing catch up, and I'd really like to delve a bit deeper into the scene over there and become a bit more knowledgeable. So my question to the hardcore followers of the Asian scene is what method do you use to watch these fights live? As I never really see any Western TV interest in even the big world title fights unless they involve an American (which I think is a massive shame). Are they on a specialist channel? Or does it involve illegal methods that I would NEVER use and NEVER want to accidently stumble upon ten minutes before a decent card is about to start.
Well I'm hoping that being on here people will help me out with finding a permanent spot to watch these fights :D

I usually just gamble on the day trying to find a place to watch the fights, usually without much luck. I've tried Keyhole TV before, but the two times I have it was terrible.

Thankfully, big fights are generally uploaded to YouTube within hours of taking place, so you can generally watch 'as live' if you wanted to :good
 

Vic

Jun 7, 2012
15,956
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When Kompayak PorPramook will fight again ?

[video=youtube;lhvYdiGHnw0]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhvYdiGHnw0[/video]
This fight is pure gold.
 
Jun 3, 2012
11,049
10,871
Korakuen Hall
[MENTION=23]Flea Man[/MENTION] - Jomthong Chuwattana :good

[video=youtube;-A-ICpuhQlM]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-A-ICpuhQlM[/video]

I'm surprised footage of his fight in Japan hasn't surfaced yet. I've been looking for that for quite a while now to no avail.
 
Jun 3, 2012
11,049
10,871
Korakuen Hall
Regarding Jomthong C. vs Yuya Sugizaki, I've made one last ditch effort to get footage of the fight.

I found that someone uploaded the main event of the card Jomthong appeared on, so I'm hoping he also filmed the undercard. I'm also hoping that my Google-translated Japanese hasn't scared him off from replying! :yep
 
Jun 3, 2012
11,049
10,871
Korakuen Hall
My preview of the Ioka-Yaegashi fight:



For the first time in history, two boxers from Japan will clash in an attempt to unify a division, as unbeaten superstar Kazuto Ioka, WBC minimumweight champion, takes on the hard punching claimant of the WBA crown, Akira Yaegashi.

Devoid of both talent and depth, the minimumweight division generally lacks the necessary ingredients to get the juices flowing for even the most ardent boxing fan outside of Latin America and Asia. Ioka-Yaegashi, however, is an exception to the norm and is arguably the biggest fight in the division since the rematch between Ricardo Lopez and Rosendo Alvarez back in 1998. Not only that, but it is just the third time in history that an attempt at unifying minimumweight will take place in the division’s 25 year existence.

Champion vs. Champion



Kazuto Ioka, a prodigious talent since his amateur days, has had a mercurial rise since entering the paid ranks. From decisioning the world ranked and tricky Takashi Kunishige in his third match-up, winning national honours in his sixth outing and then capturing the WBC championship a fight later, the 23-year old has certainly had his lofty ambitions matched by a steep learning curve. When Ioka won the WBC title from the-then unbeaten Oleydong Sithsamerchai, he achieved his main objective and surpassed the Japanese record shared between Nobuo Nashiro and Joichiro Tatsuyoshi for fewest bouts to a ‘world’ title.

The road to the top was not straight-forward, however. Initially starting out as a light flyweight, the Osaka native swiftly attained a high ranking with both recognised world governing bodies in Japan. Yet, despite this, landing a fight with one of the champions in the division proved futile. Hardened Mexican Omar Nino Romero was in advanced discussions to defend his title against Ioka, but unexpectedly dropped the WBC light flyweight title to the unheralded Gilberto Keb Baas. Negotiations then broke down with Baas’ representatives, leaving the Japanese speedster with very few options. Desperate to win a portion of the world crown within seven fights, Ioka and his team made a hazardous gamble in dropping down a weight division to challenge Oleydong Sithsamerchai.

Despite a struggle to make the weight, the gamble proved to be a masterstroke. One crunching left to the body in the fifth round rendered Oleydong defeated, whilst Ioka celebrated winning the WBC minimumweight belt, making Japanese boxing history and turning from an already popular figure in boxing to a megastar in his country. Perhaps most importantly, he could finally step out of his uncle Hiroki’s shadow.



Although Ioka’s pathway to world glory was tricky, Akira Yaegashi’s was treacherous. A highly regarded amateur himself, Yaegashi’s career started remarkably similar to that of his rival, winning the OPBF crown five fights in to his pro career and stepping up for a crack at the WBC minimumweight title in his seventh fight.

In this case, that is where the similarities end.

His jaw broke as early as the second round, dropped in the tenth and thoroughly outclassed throughout, Yaegashi could only display heart and a solid boxing IQ in lasting the distance against Eagle Kyowa, the formidable champion at the time.

It took almost one year for the smiling assassin to return to action, recovering from an upset six-round majority decision loss against the late Masatate Tsuji to capturing and defending the Japanese title three times and amassing a credible 8-1 record since the loss to Kyowa. Deemed to be ready for another crack at world honours, the 29-year old was matched up with WBA champion Pornsawan Porpramook. In a thriller, Yaegashi pounded out a tenth round stoppage victory over the game, but ultimately outgunned Thailander to finally realise his dream of being ‘world’ champion.

Prediction for the fight

Both Ioka and Yaegashi like to bring the action, both can punch, and both can be dropped, which should be make for a highly entertaining encounter.

In the early stages, the contest is likely to be a battle of the jabs, a battle which Ioka should win due to his superior hand and foot speed. It should, however, develop into a war of attrition the further the contest goes on. Yaegashi has shown he can come through a gruelling battle before, something Ioka has yet to do in his nine fight career. If Yaegashi can escape the first six rounds without too much damage, he could press the action in the second half of the fight and cause the upset. It is also worth noting that Ioka was dropped late on in his contest with the rugged Heri Amol, so there is previous evidence that he is vulnerable the later the contest goes on.

Ioka has reportedly made the weight safely, which was a talking point beforehand due to his struggles in the past. Both men weighed in at the division limit of 105-pounds. Due to this, Ioka will more than likely go into the fight as a firm favourite against Yaegashi.

My prediction: Ioka to come through this test and stop Yaegashi in the middle rounds after a commanding performance.

:good
 
Jun 2, 2012
20,271
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Thornhill
www.youtube.com
Minimumweight just doesn't get me excited. I've seen the smaller dude I think, in a war with some Thai. Even then, it looked a great fight, but I couldn't help scorning the two fighters for competing in such an irrelevant and useless division.
 
Jun 3, 2012
11,049
10,871
Korakuen Hall
[MENTION=23]Flea Man[/MENTION] :lol:

On the undercard tomorrow are Ryo Miyazaki, Sho Ishida and former K-1 heavyweight Kyotaro Fujimoto. All interesting prospects to look out for :good
 

Vic

Jun 7, 2012
15,956
1,405
I just posted on YT this fight....the great asian, the japanese Masao Ohba.....thought would be interesting to post here in this thread to people know since we are all fans of asian boxers.....:good

[video=youtube;njkcPRJNmi4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njkcPRJNmi4[/video]
 
Jun 3, 2012
11,049
10,871
Korakuen Hall
Kos, you know roughly what time Ioka will be in the ring pal?
Show starts at 11am I believe, so about 11:15am I'm guessing :good

Edit: Just read that the main event could begin at 12:20pm, so they might be screening an undercard fight beforehand.
 
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Jun 6, 2012
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Camden, London
Show starts at 11am I believe, so about 11:15am I'm guessing :good

Edit: Just read that the main event could begin at 12:20pm, so they might be screening an undercard fight beforehand.
Much appreciated mate :good

Thankfully I'm up so I'll be trying to find a means of viewing the fight!