This Isis Teen That Wants to Return to the UK... 'Has UK Citizenship Revoked'

Dazl1212

Ripley, strong independent woman who don't no man
May 16, 2013
18,854
5,326
UK
@Strike great post mate. I said myself, it would be fine if we knew anything worth talking about would happen when they come back. As it is it would be a few years if they're unlucky.

I think we are in agreement, it would have been best if they all died there.
 
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Davvers

That's a Davvers promise!!!
May 24, 2013
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I do find it VERY curious as to why ISIS was headline news for months, and them suddenly there was no mention of them at all in the news for about a year.

Now, the UK, US and Canada have the same news story running concurrently on the same day after hearing nothing about ISIS/ISIL/Daesh for 12 months.


All across the UK, USA and Canada the same debate is happening despite the fact ISiS folks have beem coming back for months.

Who controls our news agenda? It is completely bizarre. This is one girl and her story has been done to death, obsessively for 1-2 weeks.
 
Nov 19, 2018
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I do find it VERY curious as to why ISIS was headline news for months, and them suddenly there was no mention of them at all in the news for about a year.

Now, the UK, US and Canada have the same news story running concurrently on the same day after hearing nothing about ISIS/ISIL/Daesh for 12 months.


All across the UK, USA and Canada the same debate is happening despite the fact ISiS folks have beem coming back for months.

Who controls our news agenda? It is completely bizarre. This is one girl and her story has been done to death.
4252
 

Davvers

That's a Davvers promise!!!
May 24, 2013
4,126
1,396
Ah so this is why the Labour Party keeps getting accusations of anti semitism despite there being little evidence for the police to be concerned with. Again a story that has been referenced weekly for about a year.
 
May 21, 2013
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Shamima Begum is just a teenager. Britain should be strong enough to take her back
Richard Barrett

Yes, the Isis recruit is unrepentant. But at times like this we have to remember our own values

Shamima Begum, who achieved notoriety in 2015 as one of three young schoolgirls from Bethnal Green who left the country to join Islamic State, has re-emerged in a refugee camp controlled by the Syrian Defence Forces in north-eastern Syria. Understandably, given her situation – she is about to give birth and has already lost two children – she would like to get home. But where is home, and what does home mean?

By her account, as reported in The Times, she enjoyed living under Isis control, even as it beheaded its enemies and left their remains for all to see. She was married to a Dutch member of the group who was presumably fighting for the cause, and she was ready to bear children who could follow in his footsteps to the frontline. She appeared therefore not only to have abandoned her family but also to have firmly rejected the broader society in which she grew up.

It’s unsurprising therefore that the immediate reaction of the British government has been a complete lack of concern for her plight. The security minister Ben Wallace told the BBC: “I’m not putting at risk British people’s lives to go looking for terrorists or former terrorists in a failed state.” Indeed, Britain is not alone in wishing that all its citizens who joined Isis would either die in its territory or disappear. The United States has been urging its allies to take their captured citizens back in order to keep them from committing terrorist acts in the future, but with little success.

Male fighters are considered an unacceptable long-term risk, even if there is a good chance they could be arrested on return and successfully prosecuted and imprisoned. Women are considered harder to prosecute, and almost as dangerous. There have been enough cases of all-female terrorist cells plotting attacks in Europe to justify this concern: Safaa Boular was convicted last summer of planning to bomb the British Museum with her mother and sister. Governments even resist repatriating children, including those whose grandparents in Europe have offered to look after them.

But despite the justifiable concern, governments have a responsibility to address the problems created by their captured nationals and also to look more closely at why they made the choices they did. These people did not die or disappear, and it is unreasonable to expect the Syrian Defence Forces – who have no jurisdiction to try them – to look after them indefinitely. Few countries would accept that their nationals be handed over to the Syrian or Iraqi authorities, where summary execution might be the most likely outcome. If they are merely set free, or sent to a third country, then the risk of their doing further harm remains very real. In addition, their treatment will have an impact not just on their own behaviour and attitudes but also on their communities.

Like it or not, these individuals were products of our society, and it would make sense to take a good, hard look at why they turned their backs on it in such dramatic fashion. This can help us find ways to build the social cohesion that we increasingly need in the face of growing nativism and intolerance.

Governments may fear a rightwing backlash against any treatment of Isis returnees that looks like going soft on terrorism, but a strong society is one that can take the right course whatever the prevailing wind. It is all too easy to forget what we are fighting for when we are engaged in a battle against something that seems as evil as Isis.

The concept of an Islamic state as envisaged by many of its foreign recruits was quite different from the reality that appeared in its most violent propaganda. Many people sought opportunity that they did not have at home, or freedom from a past that seemed an inescapable limitation on their future, or release from a society that devalued them and denied them any sense of purpose. Unlike Begum, most of these recruits will have tried to get home when they realised Isis could not deliver what they sought; others may have hoped the situation would improve once the bombing stopped; and others may have felt trapped, either by Isis itself or by the fear of what their national authorities would do should they get home.

Others no doubt remained fully signed up to Isis, atrocities and all, though most of these people will indeed die or disappear. Perhaps Begum should be seen as one of them. But even she, as unrepentant as she may be, should be given a chance, if we are to stand by our values – and if we believe our society is strong enough to reabsorb a 15-year-old who went badly off the rails.


This cunt is former MI6. This is why I hate the Guardian, it seems to be the prevailing opinion on there "What about her human rights" what about the human rights of the people her or her kid could potentially blow up? Which is about as likely as one of them not going on to become a terrorist. What about the other people they could potentially radicalize. She should be tried over there.

What message does this send out to other people thinking of going down this path?

Seriously balls to her and her kid.
Jesus fuck. What an article. If the UK takes that bitch back it'll be more embarrassing than May's handling of Brexit.
 
Reactions: Dazl1212
May 16, 2013
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It's an extremely ugly situation.

Here you have someone who absolutely hates your country and everything it stands for, yet wants to come back here purely to use it's resources.

It should be locked up or thrown out on the street with no protection.
 
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Dazl1212

Ripley, strong independent woman who don't no man
May 16, 2013
18,854
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UK
:lol: :lol:
Shamima Begum: Wirral shooting range using ISIS bride image for target practice
Shamima latest: Ultimate Airsoft Range in Wallasey has started using the image after a "record number of requests" from customers

Ultimate Airsoft Range in Wallasey, Merseyside, says the move allows adults and children as young as six "to have some light-hearted fun bringing out the inner child in all."


"The targets provide some fantastic reactions and conversations," a spokesperson for the centre - which also offers images of other high profile people including Donald Trump, Margaret Thatcher and Justin Bieber - told BBC2's Victoria Derbyshire.



Michael Jones, from Liscard, owns Ultimate Airsoft Range in the secret World War Two tunnels of New Brighton, Wirral, with his partner Emma Saul.

A concerned customer passed on pictures of the target, which show at least 100 bullet holes in one image of Begum.


Wallasey MP Angela Eagle condemned the site, where children as young as six can visit.

She said: "It is wrong to use real people as targets as it can be misinterpreted, I am disapproving of shooting people who exist."

And many have blasted the shooting range's move, insisting they've gone too far.

"That's the 'inner child?' Blimey. Wouldn't want to meet the inner parents," commented one.

"I dunno whats worse, the company for producing it or the people using it. This country man," added another.

Some, meanwhile, didn't see the problem.

"Childish and distasteful but in a free society I guess they can shoot at whatever targets they please," another tweeted.

"I can't see how it's any different from the picture of Thatcher I had on my dartboard as a kid."

:rofl cant believe people are outraged..
 
Reactions: Clarence Worley
May 16, 2013
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There is one way to get total condemnation from the media.

Wait until she is asleep, stick a MAGA hat on her head, tickle her feet and take a photo of her smiling.

They would fucking love that, she'd never return.
 

Dazl1212

Ripley, strong independent woman who don't no man
May 16, 2013
18,854
5,326
UK
:lol: misogynists, because she is a terrost cunt who happens to be a woman :lol: I suppose men who want to shoot Thatcher are misogynists as well? :lol:
 
Nov 19, 2018
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British ISIS bride Shamima Begum's father blames Britain for letting her flee to Syria when she didn't even have a passport as he calls for a u-turn on decision to scrap her citizenship
  • Shamima Begum's father says UK should have investigated how she could leave
  • Begum left London to join ISIS in Syria at the age of 15, without her own passport
  • She has said she wants to return to Britain but her citizenship has been scrapped
  • Her father, Ahmed Ali, 60, says UK should allow his daughter, now 19, to return
It would be our fault - nowt to do with islam again
 

Dazl1212

Ripley, strong independent woman who don't no man
May 16, 2013
18,854
5,326
UK
British ISIS bride Shamima Begum's father blames Britain for letting her flee to Syria when she didn't even have a passport as he calls for a u-turn on decision to scrap her citizenship
  • Shamima Begum's father says UK should have investigated how she could leave
  • Begum left London to join ISIS in Syria at the age of 15, without her own passport
  • She has said she wants to return to Britain but her citizenship has been scrapped
  • Her father, Ahmed Ali, 60, says UK should allow his daughter, now 19, to return
It would be our fault - nowt to do with islam again
He needs to have a good long look in the mirror.

The authorities need to look at that school, as to why four of its pupils left to join Isis.
 

Wordup

The Count of Monte Fisto
May 16, 2013
5,136
1,801
Rotherham, South Yorkshire
British ISIS bride Shamima Begum's father blames Britain for letting her flee to Syria when she didn't even have a passport as he calls for a u-turn on decision to scrap her citizenship
  • Shamima Begum's father says UK should have investigated how she could leave
  • Begum left London to join ISIS in Syria at the age of 15, without her own passport
  • She has said she wants to return to Britain but her citizenship has been scrapped
  • Her father, Ahmed Ali, 60, says UK should allow his daughter, now 19, to return
It would be our fault - nowt to do with islam again
He's right in that it needs investigating how 3 unaccompanied minors were allowed to board a plane to Turkey without their passports or express consent from their parents.

Tricky one about her citizenship (/dons flame retardant suit), but where does she go? She is a British citizen whether we like it or not. She's not Syria's problem, or any other countries problem, she's ours. So I suppose we've got have her back, charge her with terrorism etc, lock her up and throw away the key, because she is obviously a security risk, but I can't see where else she's to go?
 
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Jun 4, 2012
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He's right in that it needs investigating how 3 unaccompanied minors were allowed to board a plane to Turkey without their passports or express consent from their parents.

Tricky one about her citizenship (/dons flame retardant suit), but where does she go? She is a British citizen whether we like it or not. She's not Syria's problem, or any other countries problem, she's ours. So I suppose we've got have her back, charge her with terrorism etc, lock her up and throw away the key, because she is obviously a security risk, but I can't see where else she's to go?
Yeah, I don't want her to be allowed back in, but objectively it is not really okay for us to say "She is your problem" to Bangladesh. She was born here. She lived her whole life here. Imagine if a white, British couple moved to Bangladesh to work as aid workers. They had a kid. The kid grew up in Bangladesh and at 19 raped and murdered someone, and Bangladesh said "Britain, we're deporting this man to you, because he is your problem". Would people be cool with that? Would people who think Bangladesh should take her, agree that in such a hypothetical, we should take in a rapist and murderer who was born elsewhere and had never stepped foot in Britain before? No they wouldn't.

I don't think the state should just be able to revoke citizenship of someone born in the UK. If I went abroad and joined a drug cartel, should the UK be able to say I am not British? Why should another country be expected to shoulder the burden?

The issue is that IF she came back, I would want her given 20 years in prison. And that wouldn't happen, she'd get 5 and be out in 2.5 and the last thing we need is more jihadists on the street.

So from a personal, biased view...fuck her, and I am glad she's not allowed in. But objectively, it is not really acceptable from the government.
 
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Dazl1212

Ripley, strong independent woman who don't no man
May 16, 2013
18,854
5,326
UK
He's right in that it needs investigating how 3 unaccompanied minors were allowed to board a plane to Turkey without their passports or express consent from their parents.

Tricky one about her citizenship (/dons flame retardant suit), but where does she go? She is a British citizen whether we like it or not. She's not Syria's problem, or any other countries problem, she's ours. So I suppose we've got have her back, charge her with terrorism etc, lock her up and throw away the key, because she is obviously a security risk, but I can't see where else she's to go?
If this were to happen I think it would be hard to find any reasonable person who would be against it.

It wont happen though, that's the issue I think most people have.
 

Dazl1212

Ripley, strong independent woman who don't no man
May 16, 2013
18,854
5,326
UK
Yeah, I don't want her to be allowed back in, but objectively it is not really okay for us to say "She is your problem" to Bangladesh. She was born here. She lived her whole life here. Imagine if a white, British couple moved to Bangladesh to work as aid workers. They had a kid. The kid grew up in Bangladesh and at 19 raped and murdered someone, and Bangladesh said "Britain, we're deporting this man to you, because he is your problem". Would people be cool with that? Would people who think Bangladesh should take her, agree that in such a hypothetical, we should take in a rapist and murderer who was born elsewhere and had never stepped foot in Britain before? No they wouldn't.

I don't think the state should just be able to revoke citizenship of someone born in the UK. If I went abroad and joined a drug cartel, should the UK be able to say I am not British? Why should another country be expected to shoulder the burden?

The issue is that IF she came back, I would want her given 20 years in prison. And that wouldn't happen, she'd get 5 and be out in 2.5 and the last thing we need is more jihadists on the street.

So from a personal, biased view...fuck her, and I am glad she's not allowed in. But objectively, it is not really acceptable from the government.
Is there not an argument that IF Syria or the Kurds were able to prosecute her she should be charged there, given that's where ISIS committed most of their atrocities?
 
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Jun 4, 2012
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Is there not an argument that IF Syria or the Kurds were able to prosecute her she should be charged there, given that's where ISIS committed most of their atrocities?
Yeah, but then again she didn't actually do anything did she? She didn't fight, didn't kill anyone...she joined a terrorist group. But I would be fine with her being charged and imprisoned in Syria.