Trump: Support among minorities surges.

Jun 10, 2013
2,808
2,034

Joe E

Proud Shitholer
Jul 29, 2012
17,861
5,542
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/pete-buttigiegs-question-to-woman-who-shook-rfks-hand-takes-awkward-turn/ar-AAFL9eg

Pete Buttigieg's question to woman who shook RFK's hand takes awkward turn

The Democrat was campaigning at the Iowa State Fair when a woman approached him and said she met Kennedy in 1968, according to a tweet from a CNN producer.

“I shook Robert Kennedy’s hand in 1968,” the woman told him.

Buttigieg responded: “So you’re good luck?”

:lol::rofl
Did she have a polka dot dress?
 
Jun 10, 2013
2,808
2,034
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/senate-dems-deliver-stunning-warning-to-supreme-court-heal-or-face-restructuring/ar-AAFKHRU

Senate Dems deliver stunning warning to Supreme Court: 'Heal' or face restructuring

Several high-profile Senate Democrats warned the Supreme Court in pointed terms this week that it could face a fundamental restructuring if justices do not take steps to "heal" the court in the near future.

The ominous and unusual warning was delivered as part of a brief filed Monday in a case related to a New York City gun law. Sens. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, Richard Durbin, D-Ill., and Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., referenced rulings by the court's conservative majority in claiming it is suffering from some sort of affliction that must be remedied.
 
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Joe E

Proud Shitholer
Jul 29, 2012
17,861
5,542
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/senate-dems-deliver-stunning-warning-to-supreme-court-heal-or-face-restructuring/ar-AAFKHRU

Senate Dems deliver stunning warning to Supreme Court: 'Heal' or face restructuring

Several high-profile Senate Democrats warned the Supreme Court in pointed terms this week that it could face a fundamental restructuring if justices do not take steps to "heal" the court in the near future.

The ominous and unusual warning was delivered as part of a brief filed Monday in a case related to a New York City gun law. Sens. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, Richard Durbin, D-Ill., and Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., referenced rulings by the court's conservative majority in claiming it is suffering from some sort of affliction that must be remedied.
Mayor Pete Buttigieg has also supported expanding the court, proposing a plan to have some justices appointed by the president and others selected by the other justices in order to "depoliticize" the court...Depoliticize. Translation: The Court is packed the wrong way. :rofl That's rich.

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/senate-dems-deliver-stunning-warning-to-supreme-court-heal-or-face-restructuring
 
Last edited:
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Bachafach

Antifa
Jul 2, 2019
975
264
24
Varaždin, Croatia
16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg says meeting with Trump would be a "waste"

AUGUST 13, 2019 / 9:09 AM / CBS NEWS

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunbergwill soon set sail on a solar-powered boatto attend a U.N. summit in New York. But when asked if she'd be open to meeting President Trump during her trip to America, Thunberg said it would be a "waste."

"Why should I waste time talking to him when he, of course, is not going to listen to me?" she said.

If she had to rate the United States' climate change efforts, Thunberg said America would rank "not very high." Thunberg wants all governments to cut emissions in line with the Paris climate accord, which President Trump has rejected. And currently, the U.S. emits more carbon than any country other than China.


Thunberg hopes to change that. The Swedish 16-year-old, described by some as the "voice of the planet," will be sailing from Europe to New York to call on world leaders to protect the environment. The journey could take two weeks — but Thunberg said she doesn't fly because of the environmental impact of air travel.

Climate Change
MORE IN CLIMATE CHANGE
But although she leads a global youth movement and has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, Thunberg said she doesn't like all the attention.

"I am very, very introvert[ed] and shy, privately," she said.

Thunberg said having autism gives her the focus and determination to act. Her activism began with a solitary strike outside of Sweden's parliament last year — but now, she's far from alone. Her sisters, Sarah and Katie O'Callaghan, have skipped school to join her on weekly strikes.

"Since we started the school striking, we became vegetarian," Sarah said. "We don't eat dairy."

"
We don't take the car as much," the girls added. "We cycle to school and take the train."

Critics dismiss Thunberg as alarmist, too young, and inexperienced. But she says her climate crusade must go on if her generation is to have a future.
 

Bachafach

Antifa
Jul 2, 2019
975
264
24
Varaždin, Croatia
American taxpayers paid over $90 billion more under Trump tax law
Kristin Myers
Kristin Myers

Yahoo FinanceJune 4, 2019,

U.S. government pulled in $93M more from taxpayers in 2018



Despite the majority of Americans receiving a tax cut, the IRS pulled in an additional $93 billion for 2018 from taxpayers on individual income taxes than it did for 2017, according to new data from the IRS. This is in part thanks to the Treasury Department processing 1.5% more individual returns for 2018 than 2017.
After the passage of Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), the IRS encouraged taxpayers to update their withholdings, but few did. More than halfway through 2018, after the law took effect, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) warned that more Americans would owe money to the IRS under the new law while those receiving refunds would decrease. In the end, many Americans saw modest increases in their paychecks throughout the year, but didn’t notice.

Instead, as people filed, many bemoaned getting smaller-than-anticipated refunds or even being hit with a “surprise” tax bill.
The IRS collected $1.97 trillion in gross collections (the amount before refunds) for 2018. That figure stood at roughly $1.87 trillion for 2017. Refunds did increase this year — but not by much. The IRS refunded about $398 billion to taxpayers for 2018. For 2017, it was roughly $386 billion.
And after refunds, the IRS collected about $93 billion more from individual American taxpayers than it did in 2017. Interestingly, that number stands close to the tax break amount that corporations received from the TCJA in 2018. Last year, big businesses paid $91 billion less in taxes than they had in 2017, prior to the new law’s passage.
U.S. President Donald Trump departs after giving remarks on tax cuts for American workers during an event in the White House Rose Garden in Washington, U.S., April 12, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

U.S. President Donald Trump departs after giving remarks on tax cuts for American workers during an event in the White House Rose Garden in Washington, U.S., April 12, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin LamarqueMoreA bumpy ride
As Americans were being surprised about their tax bills, approximately 40 Democrats in the Senate criticized the Treasury Department for manipulating withholding tables to make it appear as if Americans had received a windfall.
“It looks like the Trump Treasury Department spent 2018, an election year, goosing people’s paychecks by under-withholding, and it should have been obvious that the bill would come due eventually,” Senate Finance Committee Ranking Member Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) said in a statement.
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) also slammed the administration over its tax policy: “Many Americans depend on their tax refund to pay bills and make ends meet – but this tax season, working families will see smaller than expected returns and surprise tax bills because the Trump administration used smoke and mirrors in a shallow attempt to exaggerate the impact of their tax law on middle class families for political reasons.
At first, refunds on average were down a staggering 17%, before slowly creeping upward and remaining relatively flat. According to the most recent statistics from the IRS, by the beginning of May, individual income tax returns on average were down 1.6% when compared to the year prior. (And as always, some states are better than others for taxpayers.)
Alaska is the best state for American taxpayers. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)

Alaska is the best state for American taxpayers. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)‘Those in the top 1%... got an average tax cut of about $33,000’
According to analysis from the Tax Policy Center, 65% of Americans received a tax cut from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) while roughly 6% paid more. And the law, passed in December 2017, was widely criticized as a boon for the wealthy and large businesses which saw their corporate tax rate drop from 35% to 21% last year.
The center noted: “The lowest income households (those making less than about $25,000) got an average tax cut of about $40. Middle-income households (who made between about $48,000 and $86,000) paid about $800 less. Those in the top 1%, who made $733,000 or more, got an average tax cut of about $33,000.”
Kristin Myers is a reporter at Yahoo Finance. Follow her on Twitter.
 
Jun 4, 2013
15,397
1,492
I have a brother who is a prison guard.

He voted for Trump but he is practically a left winger compared to most of those guards ( I have actually noticed some of his buddies from work seem to have white supremacy imagery on their Facebooks).

Anyhow not shocking one of those guys runs to four chain.
 

Bachafach

Antifa
Jul 2, 2019
975
264
24
Varaždin, Croatia
More than half of all Americans think Donald Trump fuels white supremacy
Grace Panetta and Walt Hickey

32m
President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport in Morristown, N.J., Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2019. Trump is heading to Monaca, Pa., about 40 minutes north of Pittsburgh, to tour Shell's soon-to-be completed Pennsylvania Petrochemicals Complex. The facility, which critics claim will become the largest air polluter in western Pennsylvania, is being built in an area hungry for investment. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
President Donald Trump. Associated Press
  • 57% of Americans surveyed in a new INSIDER poll said they thought President Donald Trumpis a white supremacist or emboldens white supremacy.
  • A surprisingly high percentage of non-liberals, including 51% of slightly conservative respondents and 27% of moderately conservative Americans agreed either that Trump espouses or fuels white supremacy.
  • In recent weeks, an increasing number of prominent leaders and Democratic politicians — including at least seven 2020 Democratic presidential candidates — have publicly called Trump a white supremacist.
  • In the past month, Trump told Democratic lawmakers of color to "go back" to where they came from, called Baltimore "a disgusting, rat and rodent-infested mess," and was accused of normalizing the type of anti-immigrant rhetoric espoused by the suspected El Paso shooter.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.
After several weeks of President Donald Trumpmaking xenophobic and racist comments aimed at Democratic lawmakers and immigrants, 57% of Americans said in a new INSIDER poll that the president is a white supremacist or emboldens white supremacy.
The poll posed this questions to 1,091 American adults: "Political opponents have said that they believe President Trump espouses white supremacist beliefs. How do you feel about that allegation?"
  • 31% said "I think President Trump is a white supremacist."
  • 26% said "I think President Trump is not a white supremacist, but his actions encourage them."
  • 12% said "I think President Trump is not a white supremacist."
  • 18.5% said "I think President Trump is absolutely not a white supremacist, I think he opposes them."
  • 13% didn't know or weren't sure.
A majority of every racial and ethnic group also linked Trump to white supremacy, with 54% of white respondents, 59% of Asian-Americans, 70% of Hispanic or Latino respondents, and 77% of African-Americans agreeing that Trump is a white supremacist or emboldens white supremacy.

All told, of the 305 respondents who said they were people of color, 37% indicated they thought the president personally is a white supremacist. Another 27% said Trump is not a white supremacist, but he has emboldened white supremacists.
 
Nov 14, 2015
9,206
9,327
Wouldn't be surprised if Fredo and Anderson Cooper were balls deep into each other.

Wasn't Fredo on one of Michael Cohen's 100-odd secret recordings too?

It's funny to see Fredo snap the way he did - he must be under an enormous amount of pressure.
 

Joe E

Proud Shitholer
Jul 29, 2012
17,861
5,542
Wouldn't be surprised if Fredo and Anderson Cooper were balls deep into each other.

Wasn't Fredo on one of Michael Cohen's 100-odd secret recordings too?

It's funny to see Fredo snap the way he did - he must be under an enormous amount of pressure.
Being complicit in the removal of a sitting President might make one a bit skittish.

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/michael-cohen-secretly-recorded-conversation-with-cnns-cuomo-telling-him-he-paid-stormy-on-my-own-report
 
Reactions: VinoVeritas
Nov 14, 2015
9,206
9,327

Joe E

Proud Shitholer
Jul 29, 2012
17,861
5,542
Yeah, forgot about the Cohen tapes til now. Remember Slappy and the Rudder saying it was all over for Trump at the time. Another of a long list of failures.

Yup. Anytime now. Slappy understood his time was up. The Rudder's only form of socializing is this board, I dare say. No wonder. If his internet personna is anything close to his interactions in real life.
 
Reactions: VinoVeritas

tommygun711

You don't have the capability for mayhem
Jun 4, 2013
11,741
2,867
29
U.S. Delays Some China Tariffs Until Stores Stock Up for Holidays

The delay in tariffs comes as the Trump administration faces mounting pressure from businesses and community groups who say the continuing trade war with China is hurting them.CreditEtienne Laurent/EPA, via Shutterstock




Image
The delay in tariffs comes as the Trump administration faces mounting pressure from businesses and community groups who say the continuing trade war with China is hurting them.

The delay in tariffs comes as the Trump administration faces mounting pressure from businesses and community groups who say the continuing trade war with China is hurting them.CreditCreditEtienne Laurent/EPA, via Shutterstock
By Ana Swanson

WASHINGTON — President Trump on Tuesday unexpectedly put off new tariffs on many Chinese goods, including cellphones, laptop computers and toys, until after the start of the Christmas shopping season, acknowledging the effect that his protracted trade war with Beijing could have on Americans.
Mr. Trump pushed a 10 percent tariff on some imports to Dec. 15, and excluded others from it entirely, while facing mounting pressure from businesses and consumer groups over the harm they say the trade conflict is doing.
The stock market soared after the announcement, following weeks of volatility driven by fears that the standoff between the world’s two largest economies could hamper global economic growth.
The decision was the latest twist in a dispute during which China and the United States have alternately escalated tensions with tit-for-tat tariffs and softened their positions as they sought a deal.

Mr. Trump continued to insist on Tuesday that the trade war was hurting only China. But he also admitted that there was potential for the new tariffs to inflict economic pain closer to home.
“Just in case they might have an impact on people,” the president told reporters, “what we’ve done is we’ve delayed it so that they won’t be relevant for the Christmas shopping season.”
Mr. Trump, frustrated that negotiations had failed to yield an agreement, said on Aug. 1 that the United States would impose the 10 percent tariff on $300 billion worth of Chinese imports on Sept. 1. That would be in addition to a 25 percent tariff already imposed on $250 billion of Chinese goods.
But on Tuesday, the United States trade representative’s office said that while a substantial amount of Chinese imports would be subject to the Sept. 1 levy as planned, various consumer electronics, shoes and other items would be spared until mid-December.
The office also said it was dropping 25 types of products from the tariff list altogether “based on health, safety, national security and other factors.” The items include car seats, shipping containers, cranes, certain fish, and Bibles and other religious literature, a spokesman said.
Stocks rallied immediately on the news, with the S&P 500 climbing nearly 2 percent in morning trading before ending the day up 1.5 percent. The benchmark index was lifted partly by shares in retailers and computer chip producers that have been especially sensitive to the trade tensions.
Best Buy, which gets many of the products it sells from China, was among the best-performing stocks in the S&P 500, rising more than 6.5 percent. Apple, whose iPhones and computers would have been subject to the tariffs, climbed more than 4 percent. The technology-heavy Nasdaq composite index ended the day up more than 2 percent.
The tariff announcement followed what Mr. Trump described as a “very productive” call involving Liu He, China’s vice premier and its lead trade negotiator; Robert Lighthizer, the United States trade representative; and Steven Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary.
The three agreed to speak again in two weeks, China’s state-run Xinhua News Agency reported. Negotiators had planned to meet again early next month in Washington.
Now, about $112 billion of Chinese goods will be hit with the 10 percent levy on Sept. 1, according to Chad Bown, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Another $160 billion in goods will be subject to the tariff as of Dec 15, he estimated.
Whether the president’s move on Tuesday will ease tensions enough to make a deal with Beijing more likely was unclear.

Mr. Trump has been pressing Beijing since last year for an agreement that would, among other things, strengthen protections for American intellectual property, open Chinese markets to American business and result in China’s buying large quantities of American energy and agricultural goods.

But negotiators have made little progress since May. The stumbling blocks included whether the White House would roll back the tariffs already in place and whether Beijing would enshrine in law the changes it pledged to make.
As his re-election campaign gears up, Mr. Trump is increasingly focused on ending the conflict in order to maintain his support among farmers, who have lost some of their main export opportunities as China ordered state-owned companies to stop buying American soybeans. But he has also expressed an unwillingness to accept a deal with China that falls short of his goals.
[Mr. Trump said his tariffs and tax cuts would set off a wave of investment, but data show they have not caused a significant return of factory activity from overseas.]
The president has tried to persuade China to buy large amounts of American farm goods before an agreement is reached, but that hasn’t happened. He continued to berate China on Tuesday for not making such purchases and suggested that the tariffs might force it to do so.
“As usual, China said they were going to be buying ‘big’ from our great American Farmers,” he wrote on Twitter. “So far they have not done what they said. Maybe this will be different!”
Chinese officials and state media outlets have responded to Mr. Trump’s prodding by taking an increasingly strident tone and threatening to punish American firms.
China has also allowed the value of its currency to fluctuate in recent weeks, raising the specter that it would use it as a weapon. That prompted the White House to label China a currency manipulator, the first time the United States had done that since 1994.
The tariff delay could create an opening for Chinese officials to soften their statements. There is also the question of whether the Trump administration will allow American companies to continue supplying certain goods to the Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei despite a ban on such trade because of national security concerns.
A so-called temporary general license that allows American companies to supply Huawei despite the ban is set to expire on Monday, but the Trump administration could renew it.
Trade groups said they welcomed the reprieve on tariffs for the holiday season, but added that the changes would not reduce the uncertainty they faced.
“The hope is that this creates an opportunity for the two sides to get back to the table, resume the broad-based trade talks and look at some confidence-building measures that would boost the prospects of a big deal down the road,” said Myron Brilliant, the executive vice president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
Matt Priest, the president of the Footwear Distributors and Retailers of America, said the delay was also an acknowledgment by the Trump administration that Americans were bearing the cost of the trade war.
“It is no coincidence that the administration is allowing certain shoes to come in without raising taxes in hopes that prices do not rise at retail during the holidays,” Mr. Priest said. “While we are pleased with the decision to delay new tariffs on certain shoes, we are not satisfied.”
Among corporate leaders, Timothy D. Cook, Apple’s chief executive, has been particularly active in lobbying the president and Mr. Lighthizer against the tariffs. Apple, which builds most of its products in China, has been hit by the tariffs on some smaller products like the Mac Mini, computer parts and cables. But the latest round of proposed levies significantly raised the stakes for the company.
So far, Apple has not raised prices because of the initial tariffs. And the company would probably try to absorb a 10 percent levy on iPhones at first, too, Daniel Ives, a technology analyst for Wedbush Securities, said in a research note Tuesday.
But if the tariffs continue into next year, he said, “Apple will have no choice but to pass this incremental $75 to $100 per smartphone to U.S. consumers.”
Mr. Trump’s tariffs have been front and center for corporate executives and investors since the trade war flared anew in May, and the topic had often been cited on earnings calls between company leaders and shareholders.
With the most onerous levies — those set for Sept. 1 — not yet in place, retail executives have mostly played down their impact on profits, at least publicly. The biggest retailers, including Best Buy, Macy’s, Target and Walmart, are scheduled to report earnings for the most recent quarter starting this week.

Jack Nicas contributed reporting from San Francisco, and Stephen Grocer and Matt Phillips from New York.
A version of this article appears in print on Aug. 14, 2019, Section A, Page 1 of the New York edition with the headline: Facing Pressure, President Delays New Tariffs Plan. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

Has Trump blinked in the trade war?
 
Reactions: Bachafach
Jun 4, 2013
15,397
1,492
U.S. Delays Some China Tariffs Until Stores Stock Up for Holidays

The delay in tariffs comes as the Trump administration faces mounting pressure from businesses and community groups who say the continuing trade war with China is hurting them.CreditEtienne Laurent/EPA, via Shutterstock




Image
The delay in tariffs comes as the Trump administration faces mounting pressure from businesses and community groups who say the continuing trade war with China is hurting them.

The delay in tariffs comes as the Trump administration faces mounting pressure from businesses and community groups who say the continuing trade war with China is hurting them.CreditCreditEtienne Laurent/EPA, via Shutterstock
By Ana Swanson

WASHINGTON — President Trump on Tuesday unexpectedly put off new tariffs on many Chinese goods, including cellphones, laptop computers and toys, until after the start of the Christmas shopping season, acknowledging the effect that his protracted trade war with Beijing could have on Americans.
Mr. Trump pushed a 10 percent tariff on some imports to Dec. 15, and excluded others from it entirely, while facing mounting pressure from businesses and consumer groups over the harm they say the trade conflict is doing.
The stock market soared after the announcement, following weeks of volatility driven by fears that the standoff between the world’s two largest economies could hamper global economic growth.
The decision was the latest twist in a dispute during which China and the United States have alternately escalated tensions with tit-for-tat tariffs and softened their positions as they sought a deal.

Mr. Trump continued to insist on Tuesday that the trade war was hurting only China. But he also admitted that there was potential for the new tariffs to inflict economic pain closer to home.
“Just in case they might have an impact on people,” the president told reporters, “what we’ve done is we’ve delayed it so that they won’t be relevant for the Christmas shopping season.”
Mr. Trump, frustrated that negotiations had failed to yield an agreement, said on Aug. 1 that the United States would impose the 10 percent tariff on $300 billion worth of Chinese imports on Sept. 1. That would be in addition to a 25 percent tariff already imposed on $250 billion of Chinese goods.
But on Tuesday, the United States trade representative’s office said that while a substantial amount of Chinese imports would be subject to the Sept. 1 levy as planned, various consumer electronics, shoes and other items would be spared until mid-December.
The office also said it was dropping 25 types of products from the tariff list altogether “based on health, safety, national security and other factors.” The items include car seats, shipping containers, cranes, certain fish, and Bibles and other religious literature, a spokesman said.
Stocks rallied immediately on the news, with the S&P 500 climbing nearly 2 percent in morning trading before ending the day up 1.5 percent. The benchmark index was lifted partly by shares in retailers and computer chip producers that have been especially sensitive to the trade tensions.
Best Buy, which gets many of the products it sells from China, was among the best-performing stocks in the S&P 500, rising more than 6.5 percent. Apple, whose iPhones and computers would have been subject to the tariffs, climbed more than 4 percent. The technology-heavy Nasdaq composite index ended the day up more than 2 percent.
The tariff announcement followed what Mr. Trump described as a “very productive” call involving Liu He, China’s vice premier and its lead trade negotiator; Robert Lighthizer, the United States trade representative; and Steven Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary.
The three agreed to speak again in two weeks, China’s state-run Xinhua News Agency reported. Negotiators had planned to meet again early next month in Washington.
Now, about $112 billion of Chinese goods will be hit with the 10 percent levy on Sept. 1, according to Chad Bown, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Another $160 billion in goods will be subject to the tariff as of Dec 15, he estimated.
Whether the president’s move on Tuesday will ease tensions enough to make a deal with Beijing more likely was unclear.

Mr. Trump has been pressing Beijing since last year for an agreement that would, among other things, strengthen protections for American intellectual property, open Chinese markets to American business and result in China’s buying large quantities of American energy and agricultural goods.

But negotiators have made little progress since May. The stumbling blocks included whether the White House would roll back the tariffs already in place and whether Beijing would enshrine in law the changes it pledged to make.
As his re-election campaign gears up, Mr. Trump is increasingly focused on ending the conflict in order to maintain his support among farmers, who have lost some of their main export opportunities as China ordered state-owned companies to stop buying American soybeans. But he has also expressed an unwillingness to accept a deal with China that falls short of his goals.
[Mr. Trump said his tariffs and tax cuts would set off a wave of investment, but data show they have not caused a significant return of factory activity from overseas.]
The president has tried to persuade China to buy large amounts of American farm goods before an agreement is reached, but that hasn’t happened. He continued to berate China on Tuesday for not making such purchases and suggested that the tariffs might force it to do so.
“As usual, China said they were going to be buying ‘big’ from our great American Farmers,” he wrote on Twitter. “So far they have not done what they said. Maybe this will be different!”
Chinese officials and state media outlets have responded to Mr. Trump’s prodding by taking an increasingly strident tone and threatening to punish American firms.
China has also allowed the value of its currency to fluctuate in recent weeks, raising the specter that it would use it as a weapon. That prompted the White House to label China a currency manipulator, the first time the United States had done that since 1994.
The tariff delay could create an opening for Chinese officials to soften their statements. There is also the question of whether the Trump administration will allow American companies to continue supplying certain goods to the Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei despite a ban on such trade because of national security concerns.
A so-called temporary general license that allows American companies to supply Huawei despite the ban is set to expire on Monday, but the Trump administration could renew it.
Trade groups said they welcomed the reprieve on tariffs for the holiday season, but added that the changes would not reduce the uncertainty they faced.
“The hope is that this creates an opportunity for the two sides to get back to the table, resume the broad-based trade talks and look at some confidence-building measures that would boost the prospects of a big deal down the road,” said Myron Brilliant, the executive vice president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
Matt Priest, the president of the Footwear Distributors and Retailers of America, said the delay was also an acknowledgment by the Trump administration that Americans were bearing the cost of the trade war.
“It is no coincidence that the administration is allowing certain shoes to come in without raising taxes in hopes that prices do not rise at retail during the holidays,” Mr. Priest said. “While we are pleased with the decision to delay new tariffs on certain shoes, we are not satisfied.”
Among corporate leaders, Timothy D. Cook, Apple’s chief executive, has been particularly active in lobbying the president and Mr. Lighthizer against the tariffs. Apple, which builds most of its products in China, has been hit by the tariffs on some smaller products like the Mac Mini, computer parts and cables. But the latest round of proposed levies significantly raised the stakes for the company.
So far, Apple has not raised prices because of the initial tariffs. And the company would probably try to absorb a 10 percent levy on iPhones at first, too, Daniel Ives, a technology analyst for Wedbush Securities, said in a research note Tuesday.
But if the tariffs continue into next year, he said, “Apple will have no choice but to pass this incremental $75 to $100 per smartphone to U.S. consumers.”
Mr. Trump’s tariffs have been front and center for corporate executives and investors since the trade war flared anew in May, and the topic had often been cited on earnings calls between company leaders and shareholders.
With the most onerous levies — those set for Sept. 1 — not yet in place, retail executives have mostly played down their impact on profits, at least publicly. The biggest retailers, including Best Buy, Macy’s, Target and Walmart, are scheduled to report earnings for the most recent quarter starting this week.

Jack Nicas contributed reporting from San Francisco, and Stephen Grocer and Matt Phillips from New York.
A version of this article appears in print on Aug. 14, 2019, Section A, Page 1 of the New York edition with the headline: Facing Pressure, President Delays New Tariffs Plan. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

Has Trump blinked in the trade war?
4D chess...


Lol
 

Joe E

Proud Shitholer
Jul 29, 2012
17,861
5,542
U.S. Delays Some China Tariffs Until Stores Stock Up for Holidays

The delay in tariffs comes as the Trump administration faces mounting pressure from businesses and community groups who say the continuing trade war with China is hurting them.CreditEtienne Laurent/EPA, via Shutterstock




Image
The delay in tariffs comes as the Trump administration faces mounting pressure from businesses and community groups who say the continuing trade war with China is hurting them.

The delay in tariffs comes as the Trump administration faces mounting pressure from businesses and community groups who say the continuing trade war with China is hurting them.CreditCreditEtienne Laurent/EPA, via Shutterstock
By Ana Swanson

WASHINGTON — President Trump on Tuesday unexpectedly put off new tariffs on many Chinese goods, including cellphones, laptop computers and toys, until after the start of the Christmas shopping season, acknowledging the effect that his protracted trade war with Beijing could have on Americans.
Mr. Trump pushed a 10 percent tariff on some imports to Dec. 15, and excluded others from it entirely, while facing mounting pressure from businesses and consumer groups over the harm they say the trade conflict is doing.
The stock market soared after the announcement, following weeks of volatility driven by fears that the standoff between the world’s two largest economies could hamper global economic growth.
The decision was the latest twist in a dispute during which China and the United States have alternately escalated tensions with tit-for-tat tariffs and softened their positions as they sought a deal.

Mr. Trump continued to insist on Tuesday that the trade war was hurting only China. But he also admitted that there was potential for the new tariffs to inflict economic pain closer to home.
“Just in case they might have an impact on people,” the president told reporters, “what we’ve done is we’ve delayed it so that they won’t be relevant for the Christmas shopping season.”
Mr. Trump, frustrated that negotiations had failed to yield an agreement, said on Aug. 1 that the United States would impose the 10 percent tariff on $300 billion worth of Chinese imports on Sept. 1. That would be in addition to a 25 percent tariff already imposed on $250 billion of Chinese goods.
But on Tuesday, the United States trade representative’s office said that while a substantial amount of Chinese imports would be subject to the Sept. 1 levy as planned, various consumer electronics, shoes and other items would be spared until mid-December.
The office also said it was dropping 25 types of products from the tariff list altogether “based on health, safety, national security and other factors.” The items include car seats, shipping containers, cranes, certain fish, and Bibles and other religious literature, a spokesman said.
Stocks rallied immediately on the news, with the S&P 500 climbing nearly 2 percent in morning trading before ending the day up 1.5 percent. The benchmark index was lifted partly by shares in retailers and computer chip producers that have been especially sensitive to the trade tensions.
Best Buy, which gets many of the products it sells from China, was among the best-performing stocks in the S&P 500, rising more than 6.5 percent. Apple, whose iPhones and computers would have been subject to the tariffs, climbed more than 4 percent. The technology-heavy Nasdaq composite index ended the day up more than 2 percent.
The tariff announcement followed what Mr. Trump described as a “very productive” call involving Liu He, China’s vice premier and its lead trade negotiator; Robert Lighthizer, the United States trade representative; and Steven Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary.
The three agreed to speak again in two weeks, China’s state-run Xinhua News Agency reported. Negotiators had planned to meet again early next month in Washington.
Now, about $112 billion of Chinese goods will be hit with the 10 percent levy on Sept. 1, according to Chad Bown, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Another $160 billion in goods will be subject to the tariff as of Dec 15, he estimated.
Whether the president’s move on Tuesday will ease tensions enough to make a deal with Beijing more likely was unclear.

Mr. Trump has been pressing Beijing since last year for an agreement that would, among other things, strengthen protections for American intellectual property, open Chinese markets to American business and result in China’s buying large quantities of American energy and agricultural goods.

But negotiators have made little progress since May. The stumbling blocks included whether the White House would roll back the tariffs already in place and whether Beijing would enshrine in law the changes it pledged to make.
As his re-election campaign gears up, Mr. Trump is increasingly focused on ending the conflict in order to maintain his support among farmers, who have lost some of their main export opportunities as China ordered state-owned companies to stop buying American soybeans. But he has also expressed an unwillingness to accept a deal with China that falls short of his goals.
[Mr. Trump said his tariffs and tax cuts would set off a wave of investment, but data show they have not caused a significant return of factory activity from overseas.]
The president has tried to persuade China to buy large amounts of American farm goods before an agreement is reached, but that hasn’t happened. He continued to berate China on Tuesday for not making such purchases and suggested that the tariffs might force it to do so.
“As usual, China said they were going to be buying ‘big’ from our great American Farmers,” he wrote on Twitter. “So far they have not done what they said. Maybe this will be different!”
Chinese officials and state media outlets have responded to Mr. Trump’s prodding by taking an increasingly strident tone and threatening to punish American firms.
China has also allowed the value of its currency to fluctuate in recent weeks, raising the specter that it would use it as a weapon. That prompted the White House to label China a currency manipulator, the first time the United States had done that since 1994.
The tariff delay could create an opening for Chinese officials to soften their statements. There is also the question of whether the Trump administration will allow American companies to continue supplying certain goods to the Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei despite a ban on such trade because of national security concerns.
A so-called temporary general license that allows American companies to supply Huawei despite the ban is set to expire on Monday, but the Trump administration could renew it.
Trade groups said they welcomed the reprieve on tariffs for the holiday season, but added that the changes would not reduce the uncertainty they faced.
“The hope is that this creates an opportunity for the two sides to get back to the table, resume the broad-based trade talks and look at some confidence-building measures that would boost the prospects of a big deal down the road,” said Myron Brilliant, the executive vice president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
Matt Priest, the president of the Footwear Distributors and Retailers of America, said the delay was also an acknowledgment by the Trump administration that Americans were bearing the cost of the trade war.
“It is no coincidence that the administration is allowing certain shoes to come in without raising taxes in hopes that prices do not rise at retail during the holidays,” Mr. Priest said. “While we are pleased with the decision to delay new tariffs on certain shoes, we are not satisfied.”
Among corporate leaders, Timothy D. Cook, Apple’s chief executive, has been particularly active in lobbying the president and Mr. Lighthizer against the tariffs. Apple, which builds most of its products in China, has been hit by the tariffs on some smaller products like the Mac Mini, computer parts and cables. But the latest round of proposed levies significantly raised the stakes for the company.
So far, Apple has not raised prices because of the initial tariffs. And the company would probably try to absorb a 10 percent levy on iPhones at first, too, Daniel Ives, a technology analyst for Wedbush Securities, said in a research note Tuesday.
But if the tariffs continue into next year, he said, “Apple will have no choice but to pass this incremental $75 to $100 per smartphone to U.S. consumers.”
Mr. Trump’s tariffs have been front and center for corporate executives and investors since the trade war flared anew in May, and the topic had often been cited on earnings calls between company leaders and shareholders.
With the most onerous levies — those set for Sept. 1 — not yet in place, retail executives have mostly played down their impact on profits, at least publicly. The biggest retailers, including Best Buy, Macy’s, Target and Walmart, are scheduled to report earnings for the most recent quarter starting this week.

Jack Nicas contributed reporting from San Francisco, and Stephen Grocer and Matt Phillips from New York.
A version of this article appears in print on Aug. 14, 2019, Section A, Page 1 of the New York edition with the headline: Facing Pressure, President Delays New Tariffs Plan. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

Has Trump blinked in the trade war?
We don't need these people and should negotiate from that point. Tariffs are essential to protect home industry. They're also used in trade negotiation. The Chinese understand that. So does Trump. This article demonstrates how U.S. industry had been gutted over the last 30 years by a Congress that had given their responsibility on trade to extra governmental organizations.