UK citizens reacts to U.S. medical costs.

Haggis

CHB World Championship People's Champion
May 16, 2013
36,377
13,132
And here's American's reacting to UK healthcare.

It's shocking how misinformed most of the Americans are on healthcare and how they seem happy to be shafted by the US system and use the right of the individual to some how justify them getting shafted.

That bitch in the red coat needs to be shot.

:hat
 

Broxi

Literal Communist
Jul 24, 2012
8,661
8,470
I took my girlfriend for an MRI on her knee yesterday cos it has been giving her issues for years and they couldn't work out what the fucks up with it ... we were talking about how much something like that might cost them, anyone know how much an MRI scan would set you back in the US?
 

rjjfan

The Greatest
May 17, 2013
11,026
4,203
I took my girlfriend for an MRI on her knee yesterday cos it has been giving her issues for years and they couldn't work out what the fucks up with it ... we were talking about how much something like that might cost them, anyone know how much an MRI scan would set you back in the US?
Your first born.
 
Reactions: DobyZhee
May 17, 2013
10,016
7,942
Louisiana
And here's American's reacting to UK healthcare.

It's shocking how misinformed most of the Americans are on healthcare and how they seem happy to be shafted by the US system and use the right of the individual to some how justify them getting shafted.

It's evident if you take the word "like" away from young Americans, women especially, they could not form a sentence. Even though the ones they do manage to get out are disjointed and annoying to listen to.
 
Reactions: Zopilote
May 10, 2013
2,584
1,414
It's not a good system. But public healthcare won't fix the healthcare system in the US, it's the COSTS that have to be regulated before any form of single payer or NHS will be viable here in the US. The problem is that whether they be hospitals, clinics, pharmacies or drug companies, it's all run by huge corporations. Even if you make healthcare Publix the costs will not change.

I'm lucky to have a company that pays 70% of my health insurance costs and I pay about $1500 a year for premiums health, dental and vision care. I pay nearly nothing in terms of actual up front medical costs.
 

Jack

P4P Star
Jul 29, 2012
8,385
2,319
The biggest issue with the NHS is that it's become an untouchable service and that will only ever be detrimental to quality. Nobody in the NHS is held accountable for poor individual performance, whether its cleaners, nurses, surgeons or those running the hospitals, the only criticism is of the government and the only solution is more money but that isn't enough. I had to go to A&E a few weeks ago and it was an awful experience yet most of that could have been fixed by the staff being better at their jobs, but it wasn't a lack of funding that stopped a team of security guards from stopping a group of loud lads from being aggressive and swearing, nor was it a lack of funding that prevented a single person coming out to check on patients who had last visited triage hours ago to see for any deterioration or to give updates on delays.

Unfortunately though, the NHS cannot be criticised without the lazy blame game being passed onto the Tory cuts. What the NHS needs, and it's what it'll never have, is accountability. That is a bigger priority than more funding but nobody will point out that it's an inefficient service, especially not from the left wing who seem to think that the "NHS" has been renamed "Our Precious NHS". It's pathetic.

Despite this though, I'm a strong supporter of the NHS and every citizen of every country should have a right to nationalised healthcare. If the Americans end up there, which I think they will, they'd be wise to learn from the mistakes in this country and shouldn't allow it to become politically untouchable because when that happens, accountability will go out of the window and with that, inefficiency will be it's replacement.
 
Jun 4, 2013
24,471
6,222
I took my girlfriend for an MRI on her knee yesterday cos it has been giving her issues for years and they couldn't work out what the fucks up with it ... we were talking about how much something like that might cost them, anyone know how much an MRI scan would set you back in the US?
My father had one for his vertigo. Turns out it was nothing more than a piece of calcium lodged in his ear. Either way, we're still paying it off. I think it was somewhere around 3k. I'm not sure how much of that cost the insurance ate, though.
 
Reactions: Broxi
Jun 4, 2013
24,471
6,222
It's not a good system. But public healthcare won't fix the healthcare system in the US, it's the COSTS that have to be regulated before any form of single payer or NHS will be viable here in the US. The problem is that whether they be hospitals, clinics, pharmacies or drug companies, it's all run by huge corporations. Even if you make healthcare Publix the costs will not change.

I'm lucky to have a company that pays 70% of my health insurance costs and I pay about $1500 a year for premiums health, dental and vision care. I pay nearly nothing in terms of actual up front medical costs.
I agree that first and foremost something needs to be done about the costs before we get to socialization.

Medicine is one of the worst run things in modern society. It's extremely inefficient, and I think it's because regulations are far too tight. I mean even for little things it costs and arm and a leg to see a doctor. On top of that, they safeguard their ridiculous salaries by holding everyone hostage.

My dad now sees a nurse practioner, and it's been so much better. He's not charged $900 every six months to get a fucking blood test and get read off a result sheet. The np charges about $10 or so to give him all his diagnostic tests and send him to a specialist if anything comes up, the same fucking thing a doctor used to charge 100 times more for. General practioner should be a dead profession, and I feel like it will at some point.

Anyways, I think the sooner we start getting humans out of medicine, the better. I remember talking to my friend's wife who is a cancer doctor, and I was telling her about the algorithm my PI built to create new medicines. I was saying that pretty soon they'll have all medicine just be a set of linear equations and won't even need doctors.

Her best argument against it was that doctors job is to have empathy and console patients. Are you really consoling someone when they get their $100K medical bill...? Anyways, AI the fuck out of this profession. At the very least, start building more medical schools like the PharmD programs did.
 
Reactions: Touche

Beefcake

Disgruntled Mexican
May 21, 2013
4,276
1,169
It's not a good system. But public healthcare won't fix the healthcare system in the US, it's the COSTS that have to be regulated before any form of single payer or NHS will be viable here in the US. The problem is that whether they be hospitals, clinics, pharmacies or drug companies, it's all run by huge corporations. Even if you make healthcare Publix the costs will not change.

I'm lucky to have a company that pays 70% of my health insurance costs and I pay about $1500 a year for premiums health, dental and vision care. I pay nearly nothing in terms of actual up front medical costs.
I agree that first and foremost something needs to be done about the costs before we get to socialization.

Medicine is one of the worst run things in modern society. It's extremely inefficient, and I think it's because regulations are far too tight. I mean even for little things it costs and arm and a leg to see a doctor. On top of that, they safeguard their ridiculous salaries by holding everyone hostage.

My dad now sees a nurse practioner, and it's been so much better. He's not charged $900 every six months to get a fucking blood test and get read off a result sheet. The np charges about $10 or so to give him all his diagnostic tests and send him to a specialist if anything comes up, the same fucking thing a doctor used to charge 100 times more for. General practioner should be a dead profession, and I feel like it will at some point.

Anyways, I think the sooner we start getting humans out of medicine, the better. I remember talking to my friend's wife who is a cancer doctor, and I was telling her about the algorithm my PI built to create new medicines. I was saying that pretty soon they'll have all medicine just be a set of linear equations and won't even need doctors.

Her best argument against it was that doctors job is to have empathy and console patients. Are you really consoling someone when they get their $100K medical bill...? Anyways, AI the fuck out of this profession. At the very least, start building more medical schools like the PharmD programs did.
The number one thing causing these retarded fucking medical costs is the bureaucracy created to negotiate with private insurance companies over what they will and will not pay for. They have a stranglehold on the healthcare industry, and Medicare for All undercuts all of their profit-driven bullshit and the administrative costs that come with it.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/13/upshot/united-states-health-care-resembles-rest-of-world.html
 
Reactions: Haggis

WaltzingMatilda

racist on the way to being banned
Nov 29, 2015
1,783
615
Sydney “Orstralia”
My father had one for his vertigo. Turns out it was nothing more than a piece of calcium lodged in his ear. Either way, we're still paying it off. I think it was somewhere around 3k. I'm not sure how much of that cost the insurance ate, though.


yeah, they’re like chrystals, they can dislodge them by turning you upside down really fast, weird but true, my mum had the same thing, doctor got a bit worried & thought she might have had a stroke, had an MRI Scan, didn’t cost a cent here in Australia
 
Reactions: Mexi-Box
Jun 4, 2013
24,471
6,222
yeah, they’re like chrystals, they can dislodge them by turning you upside down really fast, weird but true, my mum had the same thing, doctor got a bit worried & thought she might have had a stroke, had an MRI Scan, didn’t cost a cent here in Australia
Doctor thought my dad had a tumor. We're lucky a lot of his stuff have been returning negative. Also got his prostate biopsy since his antigens were elevated. Cost like 5k or something for that. We've been paying off a lot of his expensive ass medical bills. I mean he's getting a lot older, and insurance here in the States just doesn't fucking work.

Anyways, true story, but it was surreal seeing my dad's brain doctor reading off a textbook. I mean she literally gave my father a scanned page from her old textbook for an exercise he could do to dislodge the crystal from his ear or whatever. Lady barely spoke English too.
 
May 22, 2013
3,269
1,663
Australia
So my old man has today just had major surgery to remove a tumour from his liver (surgery was a success and he’s doing ok). Going to spend the next week or so in hospital as well in a private room.

Cost $500 for the excess which he’ll be able to claim back when he is back to normal.

But yeh nah... Medicare for all.. Fuck that hey.
 
Reactions: Haggis
May 25, 2013
6,344
2,816
The biggest issue with the NHS is that it's become an untouchable service and that will only ever be detrimental to quality. Nobody in the NHS is held accountable for poor individual performance, whether its cleaners, nurses, surgeons or those running the hospitals, the only criticism is of the government and the only solution is more money but that isn't enough. I had to go to A&E a few weeks ago and it was an awful experience yet most of that could have been fixed by the staff being better at their jobs, but it wasn't a lack of funding that stopped a team of security guards from stopping a group of loud lads from being aggressive and swearing, nor was it a lack of funding that prevented a single person coming out to check on patients who had last visited triage hours ago to see for any deterioration or to give updates on delays.

Unfortunately though, the NHS cannot be criticised without the lazy blame game being passed onto the Tory cuts. What the NHS needs, and it's what it'll never have, is accountability. That is a bigger priority than more funding but nobody will point out that it's an inefficient service, especially not from the left wing who seem to think that the "NHS" has been renamed "Our Precious NHS". It's pathetic.

Despite this though, I'm a strong supporter of the NHS and every citizen of every country should have a right to nationalised healthcare. If the Americans end up there, which I think they will, they'd be wise to learn from the mistakes in this country and shouldn't allow it to become politically untouchable because when that happens, accountability will go out of the window and with that, inefficiency will be it's replacement.
But those cuts do have a knock on effect on the quality of people working in these institutions. For example there isn't just a numbers shortage when their comes to nursing there is also a serious skills shortage. Fact is they pick up new skills on the job and as they get more experienced they become better nurses but due to under funding you have seen people leave nursing or go overseas where their skills are more valued so were left with not only fewer nurses but fewer capable ones. Any industry doesn't matter if it's in the NHS or not to attract the best has to be seen as an attractive proposition so what we are left with are the plebs.

And it's not just the NHS this has effected. After the Tories slashed funding to prisons which has resulted in the current crisis within are prison system we saw many experienced and good quality prison officers leave to job. The government realising the mistake they had made then put more funding back in but they are replacing those good and experienced prison officers with guys fresh out of college or high school with a few weeks training. This is basically happening across the board in the public sector the brightest and best have left and joined the private sector and so were left with the dregs of the workforce and newbies with no experience. We've seen a systematic deskilling of your public sector over the last decade and then as with any skill shortage in a sector your seeing the cost rise in hiring people with these rare skills.
 
Reactions: TFG

Broxi

Literal Communist
Jul 24, 2012
8,661
8,470
My father had one for his vertigo. Turns out it was nothing more than a piece of calcium lodged in his ear. Either way, we're still paying it off. I think it was somewhere around 3k. I'm not sure how much of that cost the insurance ate, though.
Jesus Fuck, it cost us nothing and we thought nothing of it... didn't cost us nothing of course, she's paid National Insurance all her life but just that one scan would be a good chunk of the NI she has paid so far.