UK Politics: General Election - December 12th 2019

General Election 2019: Who would you vote for?


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    44
Jun 4, 2012
28,136
18,655
I’m busy but this suggests we do not get most of our shit from Eu

That is a link I shared, and it does not show anything of the sort. What on earth are you looking at there that makes you think otherwise? That page simply lists which products are the main products exported to the UK from each region, and then lists which products from which nations are their main export to us.

For example, just because it lists "oil" as Papua New Guinea's main export to us, does not mean that oil from Papua New Guinea is a major import, it just means it's their biggest one to us. If a nation sold us 1 notebook a year and nothing else, it would be listed on that list with "notebooks" as their chief export.

The 5 biggest exports from the Americas on that list do not add up to even the figure for beef imported from Ireland.

Here is a more important link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/food-statistics-pocketbook-2017/food-statistics-in-your-pocket-2017-global-and-uk-supply

That shows that 30% of all food comes from the EU. A further 2% from other European nations, and North America accounts for 4%. That is your USA, Canada, Mexico and all the other central American nations combined. They cover 4% compared to 30% from the EU.

We have 4% from Asia. However, South Korea has a tariff free trade agreement with the EU, and ASEAN which represents most of SE Asia also has a trade agreement with the EU for free trade. So none of those deals would benefit us when we leave, meaning trade from Vietnam, South Korea etc would now have tariffs on it, where it didn't before. Likewise, we have free trade with Japan via a Japanese-EU deal.

We also benefit from EU free trade deals with Chile, Israel, South Africa, much of North Africa and several other nations.

Until we cement new bilateral deals with these nations, we would have to operate under WTO (as you like to keep mentioning) which will see previously tariff free trade now have tariffs on it.
 
Reactions: Arm Punches

mandela

CHB Führer
May 16, 2013
23,087
10,319
Scotland
It’s the same price dick head it just clearly says save £10 on the ticket

Jesus. In fact Mandy what the fuck does it cost there? And have you got any guns yet?
Looks like it's under 15 quid ($19) for a slightly larger bottle.

https://www.totalwine.com/spirits/american-whiskey/tennessee-whiskey/jack-daniels-black/p/1782750-1?glia=true&s=901&pid=cpc:Shopping+US+FLOR+ENG+SPART:::google:&gclid=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OaD7AOHMy6nesHgOYFjm39v2p8FhrJ7bWEUjbg2pGXxOjGVVPm_KnRoCNqMQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds




Nah, only weapon I need is my rep.
 
Reactions: Clarence Worley

Clarence Worley

leaner than mandy...
Nov 19, 2018
4,638
2,728
That is a link I shared, and it does not show anything of the sort. What on earth are you looking at there that makes you think otherwise? That page simply lists which products are the main products exported to the UK from each region, and then lists which products from which nations are their main export to us.

For example, just because it lists "oil" as Papua New Guinea's main export to us, does not mean that oil from Papua New Guinea is a major import, it just means it's their biggest one to us. If a nation sold us 1 notebook a year and nothing else, it would be listed on that list with "notebooks" as their chief export.

The 5 biggest exports from the Americas on that list do not add up to even the figure for beef imported from Ireland.

Here is a more important link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/food-statistics-pocketbook-2017/food-statistics-in-your-pocket-2017-global-and-uk-supply

That shows that 30% of all food comes from the EU. A further 2% from other European nations, and North America accounts for 4%. That is your USA, Canada, Mexico and all the other central American nations combined. They cover 4% compared to 30% from the EU.

We have 4% from Asia. However, South Korea has a tariff free trade agreement with the EU, and ASEAN which represents most of SE Asia also has a trade agreement with the EU for free trade. So none of those deals would benefit us when we leave, meaning trade from Vietnam, South Korea etc would now have tariffs on it, where it didn't before. Likewise, we have free trade with Japan via a Japanese-EU deal.

We also benefit from EU free trade deals with Chile, Israel, South Africa, much of North Africa and several other nations.

Until we cement new bilateral deals with these nations, we would have to operate under WTO (as you like to keep mentioning) which will see previously tariff free trade now have tariffs on it.
I don’t have time to read all that but look at the figures!!

Equally WTO will also see a lifting of previously tariffs trade

I am busy basically read start and end of post but I will read it and sigh later
 
Jun 4, 2012
28,136
18,655
How the fuck is 30% the vast majority?
Because 50% is domestic product. So 30% is of the 100% of our food, not the imported food. So let's put this into arbitrary figures. Let's imagine that the total food consumed in the UK is 100 bags of rice. Fifty of those bags are made in the UK.

That means our food imports amount to 50 bags of rice. Of that import 30 of the bags are from the EU. Which means 60% of the imported food is from the EU. Global imports from outside the EU account for 40%, but they are numerous nations. The EU works as a single body, so it's treated like one nation.

If you found out that of the hundred plus nations on earth, just ONE accounted for 60% of all your imports, you would see that as pretty huge right?

It is FAR larger than any other source on earth for our food imports. The next largest is 4%. Technically, yes if you want to count the entire rest of the world as one body, then my "vast majority" is overselling it. Let's rephrase to "clear majority" for all food imports, but in real terms it is even more significant, because (as mentioned) imports from the likes of Israel, Egypt, South Korea, Japan, South Africa, Morocco and Chile all come in via tariff free deals with the EU.

So while they're not "from the EU" they enter our shores free from tariffs via the EU deal. So you can add those to the percentage of food that will no longer be tariff free.
 
Last edited:

Clarence Worley

leaner than mandy...
Nov 19, 2018
4,638
2,728
I have. What are you reading that makes you think most of our food imports come from outside the EU?
This is a better link and it does vindicate you. I hadn’t fully read your post and I still haven’t but I will.

What I find absurd is you are basically including German supermarkets are now in the UK and the polish food isle in Tesco.

We are obviously a sizeable market for Eu exports. A so called deal will be better when actual trade is involved
 
Jun 4, 2012
28,136
18,655
This is a better link and it does vindicate you. I hadn’t fully read your post and I still haven’t but I will.

What I find absurd is you are basically including German supermarkets are now in the UK and the polish food isle in Tesco.

We are obviously a sizeable market for Eu exports. A so called deal will be better when actual trade is involved
I'm not including anything, I am just going off the data available, and as neither of us are experts on trade or food supplies, that's all either of us can do.
 

Setanta

BAD MOTHERFUCKER
May 24, 2013
6,855
2,302
Emain Macha

Amazing. Like a drunk uncle at a wedding.

I trust that was gin or vodka in his paw and that he was well oiled when that clip was shot.

Despite disagreeing with the man on nearly everything, I had taken him for a bright, well-educated, erudite thinker.

In that clip, he was an idiot, rambling all over the place incoherently....not much better than Donald Trump.
 
Reactions: Arm Punches
May 17, 2013
507
78
That is a link I shared, and it does not show anything of the sort. What on earth are you looking at there that makes you think otherwise? That page simply lists which products are the main products exported to the UK from each region, and then lists which products from which nations are their main export to us.

For example, just because it lists "oil" as Papua New Guinea's main export to us, does not mean that oil from Papua New Guinea is a major import, it just means it's their biggest one to us. If a nation sold us 1 notebook a year and nothing else, it would be listed on that list with "notebooks" as their chief export.

The 5 biggest exports from the Americas on that list do not add up to even the figure for beef imported from Ireland.

Here is a more important link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/food-statistics-pocketbook-2017/food-statistics-in-your-pocket-2017-global-and-uk-supply

That shows that 30% of all food comes from the EU. A further 2% from other European nations, and North America accounts for 4%. That is your USA, Canada, Mexico and all the other central American nations combined. They cover 4% compared to 30% from the EU.

We have 4% from Asia. However, South Korea has a tariff free trade agreement with the EU, and ASEAN which represents most of SE Asia also has a trade agreement with the EU for free trade. So none of those deals would benefit us when we leave, meaning trade from Vietnam, South Korea etc would now have tariffs on it, where it didn't before. Likewise, we have free trade with Japan via a Japanese-EU deal.

We also benefit from EU free trade deals with Chile, Israel, South Africa, much of North Africa and several other nations.

Until we cement new bilateral deals with these nations, we would have to operate under WTO (as you like to keep mentioning) which will see previously tariff free trade now have tariffs on it.
Excellent post.
 
Reactions: Strike
May 17, 2013
507
78
We are obviously a sizeable market for Eu exports. A so called deal will be better when actual trade is involved
What’s your take on Boris’ admission that Northern Ireland currently have a “great deal” with the retention of freedom of movement & access to the single market.

Also, if that’s such a “great deal”, why can’t England, Scotland & Wales also have that deal?

And finally, this is the man who was adamant that we had to leave the single market, and reject freedom of movement, so is he lying about Northern Ireland’s “great deal”, or is he lying about us needing to leave the SM & reject FOM?
 
Reactions: 3K Battery