Who were your favorite fighters who never really went that far?

DudeGuyMan

McMustache Nuthugger
Jul 24, 2012
1,180
75
USA
In my case, see avatar. Chris Arreola as it turns out was never really more than a B-tier heavyweight that the WBC loved because he was Mexican, but I always enjoyed the guy's fights and he always had something funny to say win or lose. I wish he'd gone farther just so I could have seen him talking shit with Tyson Fury, but alas it was never meant to be. But hey, if nothing else he beat Seth Mitchell into retirement. Just roasted him with brutal realism in the pre-fight build-up and then demolished him in the ring. I mean, it was just Seth Mitchell so like whatever, but in a career mostly defined by failed WBC title challenges it was a nice moment of "Come on you guys, I'm at least this real."

Who did you guys like that never won a world title, or held one for long, or who either didn't have that much talent or didn't live up to their potential? For one I always kind of wonder what Freight Train Butler could have done at heavy in the nineties if crack were never invented.
 
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May 17, 2013
11,345
9,847
Louisiana
Back in the 70's they had a guy fighting out of California I believe that went by Armando Muniz and had a decent career. He fought 4 times for the Welterweight Title, but lost all 4.

A few years back they had a young kid named Francisco Bajado that quit after 21 bouts having gone 2-2 in his last 4 fights. He fought from 01-07 and just dropped out of sight. He was being touted at one time as the next best thing in boxing at his weight class.

Then there was this kid named Billy Collins that got robbed of his career when Luis Resto, trained by Panama Lewis, beat the crap out of him and after the fight it was discovered Resto's gloves had been tampered with and a lot of the padding had been removed. Collins never fought again after that fight and until then had a 14-0 record with 11 KO's. Their fight was ruled a No Contest and Resto and Lewis were found guilty of criminal charges and banned from boxing.
 
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Jun 6, 2013
12,672
1,578
The guy that immediately springs to mind is German HW Denis Boytsov.

A talented boxer with excellent power, hand speed, and ring smarts. A style not unlike prime Mike Tyson. - But he constantly got screwed by his promoter / mob boss Kalle Sauerland, being forced to fight when injured, forced to take last-minute fights without training, and having no money for proper training.

Sadly, his career ended due to a bad (non-boxing) injury, at only 29 years old, with a record of 36 (27) - 1, and having won his last three fights.

Boytsov was found unconscious in a subway tunnel, with massive head injuries. Laughably, the police ruled it an accident, claiming he probably fell while drunk. - I guess that's what happens when you have the balls to actually sue Sauerland for the money he owes you.
 
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Squire

Let's Go Champ
May 17, 2013
5,968
2,448
Morpeth, Northumberland
Sergei Liakhovich

His FOTY win against Lamon Brewster was about the time I started getting into boxing, but since then has lost against everyone decent he's faced. He was seconds away from beating Shannon Briggs to defend his title and got KO'd out of the ring, and never really recovered. Valuev beat him easily and he has since lost to Helenius, Jennings, Wilder, Andy Ruiz and someone I've never heard of. Still seems to be fighting though
 
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Jun 2, 2012
4,481
3,772
Letterkenny, Ireland
Back in the 70's they had a guy fighting out of California I believe that went by Armando Muniz and had a decent career. He fought 4 times for the Welterweight Title, but lost all 4.

A few years back they had a young kid named Francisco Bajado that quit after 21 bouts having gone 2-2 in his last 4 fights. He fought from 01-07 and just dropped out of sight. He was being touted at one time as the next best thing in boxing at his weight class.

Then there was this kid named Billy Collins that got robbed of his career when Luis Resto, trained by Panama Lewis, beat the crap out of him and after the fight it was discovered Resto's gloves had been tampered with and a lot of the padding had been removed. Collins never fought again after that fight and until then had a 14-0 record with 11 KO's. Their fight was ruled a No Contest and Resto and Lewis were found guilty of criminal charges and banned from boxing.
Should add to this that Collins likely committed suicide as a result of this.

Lewis is a piece of shit that deserves a painful death IMO
 
May 17, 2013
11,345
9,847
Louisiana
Should add to this that Collins likely committed suicide as a result of this.

Lewis is a piece of shit that deserves a painful death IMO

Yeah, that single car accident he had sure looked like a suicide to many. That kid had a promising career in the ring and I would have loved to see just how far he could have gone if not for that one fight that robbed him of showing the world his potential.
 
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Jun 6, 2013
12,672
1,578
Thabiso Mchunu.

When he beat Eddie Chambers, he looked like a cross between RJJ and Sweet Pea. Staggeringly good footwork & defense, and an ability to attack from way outside that seemed like magic, given his tiny size.
Then he convincingly beat the fearsome Durodolo, and I really thought he had a shot at owning the CW division, despite it having been the deepest division in the sport at that time.

Sadly, he turned out to have a surprisingly bad gas tank. He totally dominated Makabu for 11 rounds, but then visibly gassed, and Makabu was able to take him out.

And after that it's been pretty much downhill. He did recently UD Lebedev, but with 5 losses on his record, I think his shot is over. Plus, his style relies on extreme athleticism & reflexes, which both should be starting to ebb at this point.
 
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Jun 4, 2013
690
13
Thabiso Mchunu.

When he beat Eddie Chambers, he looked like a cross between RJJ and Sweet Pea. Staggeringly good footwork & defense, and an ability to attack from way outside that seemed like magic, given his tiny size.
Then he convincingly beat the fearsome Durodolo, and I really thought he had a shot at owning the CW division, despite it having been the deepest division in the sport at that time.

Sadly, he turned out to have a surprisingly bad gas tank. He totally dominated Makabu for 11 rounds, but then visibly gassed, and Makabu was able to take him out.

And after that it's been pretty much downhill. He did recently UD Lebedev, but with 5 losses on his record, I think his shot is over. Plus, his style relies on extreme athleticism & reflexes, which both should be starting to ebb at this point.
Cruiser is denuded after the Usyk reign of terror. I am almost positive that he will get a shot at some point.
 
Jun 3, 2012
15,672
14,991
Korakuen Hall
I have many UK domestic examples, although I'll just stick with three.

Jamie Moore was my favourite active boxer at one point; he had some great battles against Matt Macklin, Ryan Rhodes and Michael Jones (3rd fight). The first boxing show I ever went to was Moore defending his European title against Roman Dzhuman -- which turned out to be his last win.

Rendall Munroe was never the most talented, but you had to love the effort he always put into fights. His run from beating Kiko Martinez to the fight in Japan against Toshiaki Nishioka for the WBC super bantamweight title was fantastic. If he had gotten a crack at the IBF belt held by Steve Molitor at the time, I'm confident he would have won a 'world' title.

Ian Napa was unlike any other domestic boxer at the time. Massively undersized in most fights. Couldn't punch. But he has some great skills. And in his biggest victory, he had to do something nobody thought he could: punch. Down on the cards, he put in a sustained body attack to drop Carmelo Ballone late on, and that was the difference on the cards as he won the European bantamweight title.
 
Dec 6, 2019
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I have many UK domestic examples, although I'll just stick with three.

Jamie Moore was my favourite active boxer at one point; he had some great battles against Matt Macklin, Ryan Rhodes and Michael Jones (3rd fight). The first boxing show I ever went to was Moore defending his European title against Roman Dzhuman -- which turned out to be his last win.

Rendall Munroe was never the most talented, but you had to love the effort he always put into fights. His run from beating Kiko Martinez to the fight in Japan against Toshiaki Nishioka for the WBC super bantamweight title was fantastic. If he had gotten a crack at the IBF belt held by Steve Molitor at the time, I'm confident he would have won a 'world' title.

Ian Napa was unlike any other domestic boxer at the time. Massively undersized in most fights. Couldn't punch. But he has some great skills. And in his biggest victory, he had to do something nobody thought he could: punch. Down on the cards, he put in a sustained body attack to drop Carmelo Ballone late on, and that was the difference on the cards as he won the European bantamweight title.
I still remember staying up till stupid o clock to watch Munroe Vs nishioka, I played fallout 3 all night until it came on
 
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Dec 6, 2019
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760
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At one point I thought Nathan cleverly was really good

Hughie Fury also

Broner
 

REDC

Professional amateur
Dec 12, 2015
2,845
994
I really liked flyweight Yan Barthelemy in the Olympics. Outstanding boxer with great footwork. Olympic gold for Cuba. Pro career was a huge letdown.
 
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