Zheng He Ship - True or False?

Sittin Sonny

The Antifa Shuffle
Jun 10, 2013
6,256
5,511
There could be some unknown quality we don't know about in today's times. Wouldn't surprise me.
According to wikipedia (whatever that's worth):

"However recent finds after the discovery of the Longjiang shipyards site from 2005 indicate the ships sourced tropical hardwood from Indonesia and were lined with palm fibres and concrete to maintain seaworthiness for a hull of much larger proportions. The rudder remains suggest the highest end of estimates were possible, supporting the 1962 find nearby of a 36 ft bracket, 1.25 ft in diameter for steering a vessel of 540–600 ft as stated in the court documents, and dated to about 600 years."

That would suggest the possibility that the ancient Chinese used materials and methods for building ships that were unknown to Western civilization.
 

SwollenGoat

Deicide
May 17, 2013
63,281
22,565
The House that Peterbilt
According to wikipedia (whatever that's worth):

"However recent finds after the discovery of the Longjiang shipyards site from 2005 indicate the ships sourced tropical hardwood from Indonesia and were lined with palm fibres and concrete to maintain seaworthiness for a hull of much larger proportions. The rudder remains suggest the highest end of estimates were possible, supporting the 1962 find nearby of a 36 ft bracket, 1.25 ft in diameter for steering a vessel of 540–600 ft as stated in the court documents, and dated to about 600 years."

That would suggest the possibility that the ancient Chinese used materials and methods for building ships that were unknown to Western civilization.
not so sure this makes sense

firstly,western ships were using tropical hardwoods once they discovered them...............mostly,I believe,for non structural stuff because the traditional oak was better if I remember

secondly,the problem with huge wooden ships is FLEXING and Im not sure 'concrete' is going to help that at all...................its way more brittle and would break under ANY 'flex'

thirdly,of course,the largest KNOWN wooden ship was built in the 20th century...............and incorporated iron beams,steam engines for bilge pumps and a host of shit the chinese of the 17 century had no access to.............and built at the end of a centuries long deep sea wooden ship building tradition,something the Chinese really didnt enjoy.............the uninterrupted experience gained guaranteed 'modern' western shipwrights a far greater knowledge of the engineering problems Im going to guess.............


it would be AWESOME if we could FIND the remains of one of these chinese boats though...............
 
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kf3

Jul 17, 2012
6,978
3,891
South London
concrete makes no sense to me. might be a mistranslation for a pliable glue that was reinforced with palm fibres? we use 'cement' for more than just the one substance

i couldn't find a good reference to it outside wikipedia either way.